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  • Benefactor
Posted · Benefactor
4 hours ago, robinjojo said:

I guess, things being relative, I remember when these coins were available in bulk lots.  I suppose they still are, in the form of "as found" lots.  

Here are a few listings that I think are priced on the high side, but this is my perspective of course; they might reflect current trends.

https://www.vcoins.com/fr/stores/romae_aeternae_numismatics/136/product/constantine_i_the_great_spqr_optimo_principi_aquila_standards_ric_351_rome/658930/Default.aspx

https://www.ebay.com/itm/395387664541?itmmeta=01HXT01KAT46CM0JFAWP7X596C&hash=item5c0ef0f89d:g:AQ4AAOSwg1FlwC7i&amdata=enc%3AAQAJAAAA0HsHiKh%2BFPN1o9owweFGDvlg99i%2BASMjBc9ZDB%2BGJu%2Bljd5skk4AQUyyV5mjuWHNZZUFagLWP1a641p6kgK0ni2HXtdRbhMQ%2Fiq3J9FJw0i1KKhAdCPhOP6HvafeCRimk%2BPqIAm%2B%2Biqwal1Zf2sX6JYJfWF2slbomaNL7nCu3UKuj95fWvrDMAwAy1d20a6kENZXiFsUzk%2BG5R3gwTHe5c7Rlc61G1G1P%2BftDYIJ2R0SZC5NF4b%2FAZmrCkpF4JkFcRbKTsd1S0ckaf9lBqUlGAA%3D|tkp%3ABFBMvLWGwO5j

https://www.ebay.com/itm/395315654255?itmmeta=01HXT04SRQAX3S0SP0MX2201QE&hash=item5c0aa62e6f:g:GhcAAOSwf6BlB4jB&amdata=enc%3AAQAJAAAA0HNwp89fdhUST76b0ELBRvIFHYzH1fa2xWtfNfAaxVOgwE2aVcOiZlxlpj2Luk1AScAgNSK%2BRZFw1e6qGuXBrEKdNuL59vtgkVAKV83GIpNjXbRINSCwXnBGXKJiaecSP0u9atkt%2FZQKxeO3UcWP%2F3%2FogWCXZMAf9mhuyQiYBOJ1Tq1kBDpoeMaOLukkVHGn8agLpfzcgakbfES5hbrNI9hD%2B0levLdkE2Fu%2BRYaDPrhlu%2BQlkYDFQWfqAOsxK7MT6WpVz5zGnOKlPCDqs0hLHY%3D|tkp%3ABFBMupyTwO5j

https://www.ebay.com/itm/395356948628?itmmeta=01HXT082ZKANK9VKQ5C7AP7WBH&hash=item5c0d1c4894:g:m-gAAOSwru5l3obs&amdata=enc%3AAQAJAAAA0LSfVrY46%2BC3n%2BbePgu1vvfGCHj4OlXqtEYaoRdLHwzjQGgKZ%2FzWfi7Igu7K9QV8JT1mMN1LflhenjlJ1n1ahk3ucQ%2BNU1Nq8Q8H%2FXw%2FpO7Ms%2Bh4EPxBiSwC0%2BYsphd0FjGuz7PUZvK%2FKKjRG%2Bh9NfKHSkkw%2BcCt8ahPHwipNh2nLLsed2iSeP4qwSANuR7hQSinCrzphsjYAUmZLlTjXAwYps%2BlZXIwU9awcZF41r4F%2FcDqNmoDzNrJ1OE8juknWpgfzySvNfOJMWC%2BoDwrfUc%3D|tkp%3ABFBM8q-gwO5j

Thanks. The first one definitely seems quite high to me given the condition. I can't comment on the others.

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Picked this one up pretty cheap recently

ElagabalusSACERDEISOLIELAGAB.jpg.b8558645f5bfea170ffd5ac6d289682e.jpg

I'm too poor to afford a nice Elagabalus Baetl-on-quadriga type, but this one I believe is the only other type to name his God instead of making vague references to "dei soli"

Since I was already on the hook to pay $20 for shipping, I added on a couple job lots, which coughed up this fun barbarous Marcus Aurelius, imitating Antioch - the engraver goofed and forgot to mirror the reverse die

ZomboDroid_13052024112226.jpg.fd1c1823c372df2d5b4688be3495526a.jpg

And a new Roman "key ring" which would have been used to unlock a small chest like a jewelry box

20240513_111545.jpg.f9f5a8f3241975ee2f5d54873979a4c8.jpg

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My latest, an extremely rare Crawford 45/3 Sestertius. This is the sibling issue to the extremely rare Crawford 45/1 denarius with fully incuse ROMA, thought by some scholars to be the first denarius, a type I am still missing and may never acquire. It also has a quinarius sibling which I will share below. This denomination is tough because there are a handful of these Roma/Dioscuri sestertii but aside from the common Crawford 44/7, all are very rare to unique, so it is always a good day when I can add a new one:

FB_IMG_1714327304388.jpg.97315c0502ee5ec252407e94e962ab0c.jpg

Roman Republic AR Sestertius(12mm, 1.08 g). Anonymous. After 211 B.C. Uncertain mint. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet ornamented with griffin's head and three-piece visor, earring an necklace; behind, IIS. Border of dots / Dioscuri on horseback riding right, each holding couched spear and wearing chlamys, cuirass and pileus surmounted by star; in relief in linear frame, ROMA. Line border. Crawford 45/3; Russo RBW -

Privately purchased from Jason Irving, 28 April 2024, ex Artemide 60E, 3 September 2022, lot 219

 

Its sibling quinarius, a type I acquired in 2019 which is at best scarce and the most common denomination of the series with more examples and dies known than the denarii and sestertii combined. Note in particular how similar the reverse is. Some sestertius dies have a much closer obverse as well:

20190119220725-08f548fb-sm.jpg.5161a3a0abe514499146bf11673ea4c4.jpg

Roman Republic AR Quinarius(16mm, 2.28 g, 12h). Anonymous. After 211 B.C. Uncertain(perhaps Apulian?) mint. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet ornamented with griffin's head and three-piece visor, earring an necklace; behind, V. Border of dots / Dioscuri on horseback riding right, each holding couched spear and wearing chlamys, cuirass and pileus surmounted by star; in relief in linear frame, ROMA. Line border. Crawford 45/2; Russo RBW 180; Sydenham 169.

Ex CNG Triton XXII, 1/9/2019, lot 787, ex Alan J Harlan collection, ex Spink Numismatic Circular April 1997, 1404

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6 hours ago, red_spork said:

My latest, an extremely rare Crawford 45/3 Sestertius. This is the sibling issue to the extremely rare Crawford 45/1 denarius with fully incuse ROMA, thought by some scholars to be the first denarius, a type I am still missing and may never acquire. It also has a quinarius sibling which I will share below. This denomination is tough because there are a handful of these Roma/Dioscuri sestertii but aside from the common Crawford 44/7, all are very rare to unique, so it is always a good day when I can add a new one:

FB_IMG_1714327304388.jpg.97315c0502ee5ec252407e94e962ab0c.jpg

Roman Republic AR Sestertius(12mm, 1.08 g). Anonymous. After 211 B.C. Uncertain mint. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet ornamented with griffin's head and three-piece visor, earring an necklace; behind, IIS. Border of dots / Dioscuri on horseback riding right, each holding couched spear and wearing chlamys, cuirass and pileus surmounted by star; in relief in linear frame, ROMA. Line border. Crawford 45/3; Russo RBW -

Privately purchased from Jason Irving, 28 April 2024, ex Artemide 60E, 3 September 2022, lot 219

 

Its sibling quinarius, a type I acquired in 2019 which is at best scarce and the most common denomination of the series with more examples and dies known than the denarii and sestertii combined. Note in particular how similar the reverse is. Some sestertius dies have a much closer obverse as well:

20190119220725-08f548fb-sm.jpg.5161a3a0abe514499146bf11673ea4c4.jpg

Roman Republic AR Quinarius(16mm, 2.28 g, 12h). Anonymous. After 211 B.C. Uncertain(perhaps Apulian?) mint. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet ornamented with griffin's head and three-piece visor, earring an necklace; behind, V. Border of dots / Dioscuri on horseback riding right, each holding couched spear and wearing chlamys, cuirass and pileus surmounted by star; in relief in linear frame, ROMA. Line border. Crawford 45/2; Russo RBW 180; Sydenham 169.

Ex CNG Triton XXII, 1/9/2019, lot 787, ex Alan J Harlan collection, ex Spink Numismatic Circular April 1997, 1404

Sweet coins! Is the thought these silver sestertii were struck for a very limited time before mass minting denarii/victoriatii. Very interesting if that's the case. 

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Quite an interesting denarius to fill the Galba hole until a nice one of Narbo pops up. The die engraver messed up the central placing of the bust making his backside almost touch the legend while the front has quite large fields. Another propaganda coin of Galba featuring Virtus portraying himself as strong and capable of holding the empire together.

GALBA, A.D. 68-69. AR Denarius
(3.38 gms), 
Rome Mint, ca. A.D. July 68-January 69.. 
Obv: "IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG PM" Laureate bust of Galba facing right; 
Rev:: Virtus standing facing, holding parazonium upwards and leaning on vertical spear.
 

galba.jpg

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Recently I've been cultivating a little mahogany cabinet of Greek and Roman Provincial 'ancient curiosities', with no particular theme or focus in mind. I guess my objective is to accumulate a varied group of coins spanning a broad swathe of the ancient world - both in regards to time and space. My reason for omitting Roman Imperial coinage thus far is mostly due to the fact that I previously collected these and have a good level of knowledge on them, so acquiring material outside my comfort zone pushes the boundaries of my knowledge further as a result.

This coin was my latest addition via a CNG e-auction a few weeks back, a Greco-Baktrian bronze trichalkon of Demetrius I Aniketos, struck somewhere around c. 200-185 BC. Baktria, centred on what is today Uzbekistan/Tajikistan/northern Afghanistan, was originally one of the easternmost provinces of the Achaemenid Empire. It then came under the influence of Alexander the Great following his conquests, after which it was ruled by his general Seleucus before ceding from Seleucid control in the middle of the 3rd century BC. Its territory butted up against the Mauryan Empire of India, with which there was initially conflict - though predictably a trading relationship and exchanges of a cultural nature were cultivated. Over a century later under Demetrius' rule, as the Mauryans collapsed, the Greco-Baktrian kingdom opportunistically expanded its territory into the Indus valley.

The use of elephants on Seleucid, Greco-Baktrian and later Indo-Greek coinages is widespread and notable, occurring both as depictions of the living animal and as a mask/headdress worn by rulers in their portraits - the so-called exuvia elephantis. Their significance to the Hellenistic world as a weapon of war cannot be underestimated, though of course elephants are not just physically strong and awe-inspiring but also intelligent and sensitive creatures - attributes which the writers of the ancient world were just as attuned to as we are today. 

Baktrian.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

Here's another bargain coin I got at auction for $22, no big whoop...

Seleukid Kingdom, Reign of Antiochos VIII (Epiphanes)

121-97 BC
AR Drachm (17mm, 3.18g)
O: Head of Antiochos VIII (Grypos) right.
R: Tripod; BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY downward to right.
HGC 9, 1209m; Newell 409; Sear 7149; BMC 4, 98,6
ex Forvm Auctions

MixCollage-07-May-2024-01-36-PM-4528~9.jpg

Edited by Phil Anthos
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  • Benefactor
Posted (edited)

Here are two coins from Arabia, a region that conjures images of spice trade routes, caravans, sand dunes, and Peter O'Toole riding camelback across a Super Panavision 70 screen at the local movie theater in 1960.

They are from the ancient Nabatean Kingdom during the rule of King Aretas IV.  What is interesting about these coins is the marked difference in flan size, weight and inscriptions, or lack thereof.

The coin on the left was struck on a narrow (12 mm at the widest point) yet quite thick (4 mm) flan.  The coin on the right was struck on a much wider flan, at 16 mm yet thinner flan at 3 mm.  They are representative of the wide range that coins have in terms of flan size, strike and inscriptions.

These two coins are likely the only ones to represent this particular type.  Examples that are better struck, with complete portraits, and possessing RY information are too costly for me.  While the undated sela cost only $18, it is kind of a cool coin in its own way.  The other coin was far more pricey, at $150.

Arabia, Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV (9 BC-AD 40), two AR selas, Petra mint.

Left: RY not visible. 4.34 grams.

Right:  RY 44 (35/6 AD).  Barkay 181; Meshorer 108.  3.74 grams.

D-CameraNabataeanKingdom.AretasIV(9BC-AD40)2ARselasPetraLeft4.34gRightRY44(35-6AD)3.74g5-19-24.jpg.43f6b373a85cbf60d7b472ac8acf1446.jpg

Edited by robinjojo
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Nabatean drachms are fascinating topic, they have very unique style and they are historically important. Also many of them are relatively affordable. I don't know many other silver coins of the first century CE that are known in a dozen or so specimens and can be purchased for $100-200. 

Last year I published a paper describing several new types: https://www.uni-muenster.de/Ejournals/index.php/ozean/article/view/4673/4760

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  • Benefactor
2 hours ago, Factor said:

Nabatean drachms are fascinating topic, they have very unique style and they are historically important. Also many of them are relatively affordable. I don't know many other silver coins of the first century CE that are known in a dozen or so specimens and can be purchased for $100-200. 

Last year I published a paper describing several new types: https://www.uni-muenster.de/Ejournals/index.php/ozean/article/view/4673/4760

Thank you!  I've bookmarked the paper.

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Posted (edited)


I just took in a stray.

While putting my latest coins away in their permanent homes I came across this one. I don't remember buying this coin at all, not when or from whom. I checked all my receipts and all the records at the vendor sites I usually use. I do vaguely remember something about Antigonos Gonatas, but overall I have to consign this one to the 'Senior Moment' category...  🤔

Macedonian Kingdom, Reign of Antigonos II Gonatas

277-239 BC
AE16 (16mm, 3.85g)
O: Helmeted head of Athena right.
R: Pan standing right, erecting trophy; B - Φ downward to left.
HGC 3, 1049; SNG Cop 1206-09; Sear 6786v

~ Peter 

MixCollage-18-May-2024-03-50-PM-9748~3.jpg

Edited by Phil Anthos
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I won this coin in the same auction with my Kimon Dekadrachm. Thought I’d share cause I like Sicilian coinage.

 

IMG_0676.png.94e0a05f3875c06879bd73c7fa4627ae.png
Leontini 
Tetradrachm circa 430, AR 17.11 g. 

Obv. Laureate head of Apollo 
Rev. Lions’ head, three barley grains and one leaf

 

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Oh my. I did it yet again. I clicked "buy" on yet another coin online. It should arrive in a week to two (I hope). Until then, my latest ancient remains this Byzantine Leontius Constantinople follis. Which, given the state of coinage and the empire at the time (referred to as "the 20 years anarchy" on this forum and elsewhere), qualifies as a "good enough for the type" example. Definitely not a good time to be emperor. Many tongues slit, including his, many executed, including him. Despite all of that, I really like Leontius's fierce and fuzzy expression on this piece.

695_to_698_Leontius_AE_Follis_01.png.28e5c9162f40154cf310c10f17208f36.png695_to_698_Leontius_AE_Follis_02.png.817667040d2f0e7215e14ed823ca996b.png
Leontius (695 - 698), Æ Follis, Constantinople, Obv: Legend obscure, bearded bust of emperor facing, wearing crown and loros, and holding globus cruciger, small cross in right field; Rev: large M, ANNO on left, probably year 1, officinal Δ; 23-24mm, 4.01g, MIB 32 var., Sear 1334 var.

 

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Posted · Supporter

I've had this coin for a couple years but only now got around to taking photos: a bronze prutah struck under Antonius Felix.

Felix was a freedman who had gained his governorship by the influence of his brother Pallas, Claudius's finance minister. Felix had an interesting and checkered career and was known for his corruption, avarice, and cruelty: qualities which revealed themselves in his dealings with the Apostle Paul as related in Acts 23 and 24:

"And after certain days, when Felix came with his wife Drusilla, which was a Jewess, he sent for Paul, and heard him concerning the faith in Christ. And as he reasoned of righteousness, temperance, and judgment to come, Felix trembled, and answered, Go thy way for this time; when I have a convenient season, I will call for thee. He hoped also that money should have been given him of Paul, that he might loose him: wherefore he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him...." (Acts 24:24-26, KJV)

AntoniusFelixPrutah.jpg.4b5259435b4321112b7383d9636f3a29.jpg

ROMAN PROCURATORS OF JUDAEA
Time of Antonius Felix, AD 52-60
AE Prutah (16.40mm, 2.27g, 4h)
Struck AD 54. Jerusalem mint
Obverse: ΝΕΡΩ ΚΛΑΥ ΚΑΙϹΑΡ, crossed shields in front of crossed spears
Reverse: ΒΡΙΤ ΚΑΙ above and below palm tree; L-ΙΔ across fields
References: RPC I 4971, Hendin 6377
Earthen patina. Struck under the procuratorship of Antonius Felix, the Roman governor before whom Paul appeared in Acts 23 & 24.

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I got myself a beautifully toned denarius of C. Postumius:

 

5DC9BB50-B0A6-41B0-A419-E62557119E4F.jpeg.b731685d16bc3b8d6ad3f19651a5d329.jpeg

9EFAB2E6-7ADD-4DC7-9577-F5A0C1E180C8.jpeg.90b4f0932923640c844d2ef43fb0d9a1.jpeg

231E91C5-7D1B-4C17-A517-22380271326E.jpeg.7f52c4c5fbe87b3a0e127ae1f69b088f.jpeg
 

Roman Republic, C. Postumius, silver denarius c. 73 BC, Diana facing right with bow and quiver/hound bounding to right, spear below.

VF+, old collection tone, minor surface marks.

Cr. 394/1a

From the collection of Rudolf Hoesch (1904-1990).

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, CassiusMarcus said:

A new arrival today

A nice addition to my Seleucid set, I know that there is debate on whether or not this is actually Seleucus I Nikator himself, I like to think it is just for collecting sake 😆🤣

IMG_4693.jpg

IMG_4692.jpg

Cool

Edited by El Cazador
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  • Benefactor
Posted (edited)

This is a recent purchase out of my local coin dealer's box of ancients.  This is now the best example in terms of strike (most legends visible) engraving, and metal quality, which can vary greatly with this issue for the Melqart type. The flan has the typical oval shape of tetradrachm coinage of this period.

Trajan, AR tetradrachm, Antioch, 113/4 AD.

Wruck 168;  Prieur 1518;  McAlee 463, RPC III №: 3550.

14.83 grams 

RPC Specimens: 10 (5 in the core collections)

Obverse: ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙϹ ΝΕΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕΒ ΓΕΡΜ ΔΑΚ; laureate head of Trajan, right above eagle standing right; club below head.
Reverse: ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΙΗ ΥΠΑΤ Ϛ; laureate head of Melqart, with lion skin, right.

D-CameraTrajanARtetradrachmAntioch113-4ADPrieur1518RPCIII355014.83grams5-29-24.jpg.1ed41968c615786d5ffb6be9ed8b3db5.jpg

 

This is my Tyche seated type, purchased in 2020:

Trajan, tetradrachm, Antioch, 109/10 AD.

RPC Volume: III №: 3537

14.3 grams

D-CameraTrajantetradrachmPhoeniciaTyre103-11ADPrieur149814_3g.10-14-20.jpg.ab0695d978956b6423bcd5528ade14cc.jpg

Edited by robinjojo
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