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2 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Another Caligula.. 😄 another he says... 

Thats a fantastic example! Gratulation! Lovely typical Caligula portrait, detailed and sharp reverse, well centered, full legends at boot sides - and a fantastic patina color. Again, Gratulation!

Thanks for the nice words! Sadly there’s not much options when it comes to my 2 favourite emperors Caligula/Claudius in the affordable range in imperial silver. So I like to have a deep collection of their bronzes along with the Agrippa/Germanicus issues which I really like. Also on the look out for British imitations but no luck so far 😛

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IMG_0759.jpeg.a32c57338ad1f9b5d0d38ac74b0bc8c4.jpeg

I love the this "spanish style" of Roman Bronze coins. I once had a very nice Caligula bronze from Caesaraugusta - now it has become a Tiberius. This dupondius from Caesaraugusta was issued in honour of the legions Legio IV Macedonica, Legio VI Hispaniensis (later surnamed Victrix under Nero) and Legio X Gemina. Veterans of IV Macedonica, VI Hispaniensis and X Gemina were among the first settlers in the Colonia Caesaraugusta (Saragossa) around 15 BC. At this time, the legions were deployed for extensive road and bridge construction work on the Via Augusta. The Muel Dam was also built by the legion.

Legio IV Macedonica was a legion of the Roman army that was formed in 48 BC by Gaius Iulius Caesar with Italian legionaries. It was disbanded by Emperor Vespasian in 70 AD. The legion's symbols were the bull and the capricorn (mythological figure: half ibex, half fish). In the summer of 44 BC, the legion was moved to Italy by Marcus Antonius. Legio IIII Macedonica joined Caesar's adopted son Octavian in 44 BC and initially fought with him on the side of the Senate in the Battle of Mutina during the Mutinian War against Marcus Antonius, then after the formation of the Second Triumvirate in 42 BC against Caesar's murderers in the Battles of Philippi. Octavian moved the legion back to Italy and deployed it in the winter of 41/40 BC in the Perusine War against Marcus Antonius' brother Lucius Antonius and finally again against Antonius in the naval battle of Actium in 31 BC. Octavian moved the legion to the Tarraconensis in 30 BC to take part in the Cantabrian War against the Cantabrians and Asturians. After Augustus' victory in 13 BC, the legion remained in the province and was stationed at Herrera de Pisuerga. The legionaries were also widely deployed in the civil administration of Iberia.

Legio VI Hispaniensis (later Victrix) was a legion of the Roman army that was raised by Octavian in 41 BC and existed until the early 5th century. The legion's emblem was probably a bull. It was a copy of the Legio VI Ferrata that served under Marcus Antonius and probably consisted in part of veterans of this legion, some of whom upheld the traditions of the Caesarian Ferrata. Legio VI had its first mission in Perusia in the same year and also fought in Sicily against Sextus Pompeius, who was disrupting Rome's grain supply from there. In 31 BC, she fought in the battle of Actium against Marcus Antonius. The following year it was stationed in Hispania Tarraconensis, where it took part in Augustus' Cantabrian War against the Cantabrians, which lasted from 29 BC to 19 BC. The legions VI Victrix and X Gemina were initially stationed together in an unknown camp in Asturias. Legio VI was later presumably transferred to León, while X Gemina was stationed in Petavonium (Rosinos de Vidriales). The name Victrix dates from the time of Nero.

Legio X was a legion of the Roman army. Because Caesar once gave the X Legion horses and used them as cavalry, as he did not trust the allied Gallic horsemen, it was also called Legio X Equestris ("tenth mounted legion"). Augustus renamed the legion Legio X Gemina ("tenth twin legion"). The legion's symbol was a bull. Legio X was first mentioned in 58 BC, when the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis was threatened by the Helvetii. Initially, Gaius Iulius Caesar could only rely on this single legion, which was stationed near Geneva. In the Gallic War, Legio X Equestris played an important role in Caesar's military success; he himself described it as his favourite legion. After Caesar's assassination, the legion was reorganised by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC and assigned to the army of Marcus Antonius. It fought for the triumvirs Augustus, Lepidus and Marcus Antonius in the Battle of Philippi against Caesar's murderers in 42 BC. The newly formed Legio X Gemina was stationed in Hispania Tarraconensis, where Augustus was preparing a campaign against the Cantabrians. It took part in the Cantabrian War from 29 BC to 19 BC.

The magistrate Marcus Porcius Cato mentioned here was a member of the gens Porcia and probably a descendant of the famous advocate of the republican state Marcus Porcius Cato the Younger, the fierce opponent of Gaius Iulius Caesar, who committed suicide in Utica in 46 BC. In 27 BC Marcus Porcius Cato was praetor and in the following year took part in the plot instigated by Lucius Aelius Seianus against the Roman knight Titius Sabinus, a supporter of Germanicus whom he hated. In addition to Cato, the praetors Lucius Lucanius Latiaris, Petillius Rufus and Marcus Opsius were also involved in the plot. Sabinus was then executed by order of Tiberius. The conspirators had misled Sabinus into making careless remarks about Tiberius and then denounced him in order to ingratiate themselves with the emperor and be rewarded with the consulship. While Lucanius and Opsius did not achieve their goal but were executed as supporters of Seian, Cato became suffect consul for the last part of the year 36 AD. He attained the office of curator aquarum for another month in 38 AD, but was then presumably also executed.

About the magistrate Lucius Vettiacus I didn’t find any informations.

 
RPC Online as Reference Coin: https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/1/346

Tiberius Iulius Caesar Augustus; Magistrate: Marcus Cato, Lucius Vettiacus; Mint: Caesaraugusta, Tarraconensis Hispania; Date: 31/32 AD; Nominal: Dupondius; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 32mm; Weight: 20.98g; Reference: RPC I 346; Obverse: Tiberius seated on curule chair, left; Inscription: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS PONT MAX TR POT XXXIII; Translation: Tiberius Caesar Divi Augusti Filius Augustus Pontifex Maximus Tribunicia Potestate Tricesima Tertia; Translation: Tiberius, Caesar, son of divine Augustus, emperor, high priest, Holder of tribunician power for the 33rd time; Reverse: Vexillum between two circular standards (radiate phalerae), each on a basis; Inscription: C C A M CATO L VETTIACVS IIVIR LEG IV LEG VI LEG X; Translation: Colonia Caesar Augusta, Marcus Cato Lucius Vettiacus Duovir, Legio IV (Macedonica), Legio VI (Hispaniensis), Legio X (Gemina).

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33 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

IMG_0759.jpeg.a32c57338ad1f9b5d0d38ac74b0bc8c4.jpeg

I love the this "spanish style" of Roman Bronze coins. I once had a very nice Caligula bronze from Caesaraugusta - now it has become a Tiberius. This dupondius from Caesaraugusta was issued in honour of the legions Legio IV Macedonica, Legio VI Hispaniensis (later surnamed Victrix under Nero) and Legio X Gemina. Veterans of IV Macedonica, VI Hispaniensis and X Gemina were among the first settlers in the Colonia Caesaraugusta (Saragossa) around 15 BC. At this time, the legions were deployed for extensive road and bridge construction work on the Via Augusta. The Muel Dam was also built by the legion.

Legio IV Macedonica was a legion of the Roman army that was formed in 48 BC by Gaius Iulius Caesar with Italian legionaries. It was disbanded by Emperor Vespasian in 70 AD. The legion's symbols were the bull and the capricorn (mythological figure: half ibex, half fish). In the summer of 44 BC, the legion was moved to Italy by Marcus Antonius. Legio IIII Macedonica joined Caesar's adopted son Octavian in 44 BC and initially fought with him on the side of the Senate in the Battle of Mutina during the Mutinian War against Marcus Antonius, then after the formation of the Second Triumvirate in 42 BC against Caesar's murderers in the Battles of Philippi. Octavian moved the legion back to Italy and deployed it in the winter of 41/40 BC in the Perusine War against Marcus Antonius' brother Lucius Antonius and finally again against Antonius in the naval battle of Actium in 31 BC. Octavian moved the legion to the Tarraconensis in 30 BC to take part in the Cantabrian War against the Cantabrians and Asturians. After Augustus' victory in 13 BC, the legion remained in the province and was stationed at Herrera de Pisuerga. The legionaries were also widely deployed in the civil administration of Iberia.

Legio VI Hispaniensis (later Victrix) was a legion of the Roman army that was raised by Octavian in 41 BC and existed until the early 5th century. The legion's emblem was probably a bull. It was a copy of the Legio VI Ferrata that served under Marcus Antonius and probably consisted in part of veterans of this legion, some of whom upheld the traditions of the Caesarian Ferrata. Legio VI had its first mission in Perusia in the same year and also fought in Sicily against Sextus Pompeius, who was disrupting Rome's grain supply from there. In 31 BC, she fought in the battle of Actium against Marcus Antonius. The following year it was stationed in Hispania Tarraconensis, where it took part in Augustus' Cantabrian War against the Cantabrians, which lasted from 29 BC to 19 BC. The legions VI Victrix and X Gemina were initially stationed together in an unknown camp in Asturias. Legio VI was later presumably transferred to León, while X Gemina was stationed in Petavonium (Rosinos de Vidriales). The name Victrix dates from the time of Nero.

Legio X was a legion of the Roman army. Because Caesar once gave the X Legion horses and used them as cavalry, as he did not trust the allied Gallic horsemen, it was also called Legio X Equestris ("tenth mounted legion"). Augustus renamed the legion Legio X Gemina ("tenth twin legion"). The legion's symbol was a bull. Legio X was first mentioned in 58 BC, when the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis was threatened by the Helvetii. Initially, Gaius Iulius Caesar could only rely on this single legion, which was stationed near Geneva. In the Gallic War, Legio X Equestris played an important role in Caesar's military success; he himself described it as his favourite legion. After Caesar's assassination, the legion was reorganised by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC and assigned to the army of Marcus Antonius. It fought for the triumvirs Augustus, Lepidus and Marcus Antonius in the Battle of Philippi against Caesar's murderers in 42 BC. The newly formed Legio X Gemina was stationed in Hispania Tarraconensis, where Augustus was preparing a campaign against the Cantabrians. It took part in the Cantabrian War from 29 BC to 19 BC.

The magistrate Marcus Porcius Cato mentioned here was a member of the gens Porcia and probably a descendant of the famous advocate of the republican state Marcus Porcius Cato the Younger, the fierce opponent of Gaius Iulius Caesar, who committed suicide in Utica in 46 BC. In 27 BC Marcus Porcius Cato was praetor and in the following year took part in the plot instigated by Lucius Aelius Seianus against the Roman knight Titius Sabinus, a supporter of Germanicus whom he hated. In addition to Cato, the praetors Lucius Lucanius Latiaris, Petillius Rufus and Marcus Opsius were also involved in the plot. Sabinus was then executed by order of Tiberius. The conspirators had misled Sabinus into making careless remarks about Tiberius and then denounced him in order to ingratiate themselves with the emperor and be rewarded with the consulship. While Lucanius and Opsius did not achieve their goal but were executed as supporters of Seian, Cato became suffect consul for the last part of the year 36 AD. He attained the office of curator aquarum for another month in 38 AD, but was then presumably also executed.

About the magistrate Lucius Vettiacus I didn’t find any informations.

 
RPC Online as Reference Coin: https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/1/346

Tiberius Iulius Caesar Augustus; Magistrate: Marcus Cato, Lucius Vettiacus; Mint: Caesaraugusta, Tarraconensis Hispania; Date: 31/32 AD; Nominal: Dupondius; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 32mm; Weight: 20.98g; Reference: RPC I 346; Obverse: Tiberius seated on curule chair, left; Inscription: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS PONT MAX TR POT XXXIII; Translation: Tiberius Caesar Divi Augusti Filius Augustus Pontifex Maximus Tribunicia Potestate Tricesima Tertia; Translation: Tiberius, Caesar, son of divine Augustus, emperor, high priest, Holder of tribunician power for the 33rd time; Reverse: Vexillum between two circular standards (radiate phalerae), each on a basis; Inscription: C C A M CATO L VETTIACVS IIVIR LEG IV LEG VI LEG X; Translation: Colonia Caesar Augusta, Marcus Cato Lucius Vettiacus Duovir, Legio IV (Macedonica), Legio VI (Hispaniensis), Legio X (Gemina).

Cool type! 👍

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This is a 2020 summer win, almost exactly to the date, but with a new (and I think) better pic:

1238262_15917746211.jpg.e9959f0d48199b6760567bfab387f7bb.jpg

Probus
AE22mm 3.29g billon antoninianus/aurelianus, minted at Lugdunum, August-September 282.
IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG; radiate, draped, cuirassed bust seen from rear.
COME - S AVG; Draped and helmeted Minerva standing left, holding olive branch in right hand and spear and shield in left hand. A in left field.
RIC V 115, Bastien 373

Last issue for Probus at Lugdunum/Lyon. 

Edited by seth77
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I got myself a “limes” denarius of Trajan as an impulse purchase. A reason why I bought this “limes” denarius is because I also own a silver denarius with the same reverse type:

56DF8860-1B63-4763-8A4E-681208E66E9B.jpeg.d8d1999693cb2474587184e29cae1eaf.jpeg

Roman Empire, Trajan 98-117, Base silver Limes Denarius 2.87g, 19mm Lauraete and draped bust of Trajan right "IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC" Genius standing left, holding a patera and grain ears. "PM TR P COS VI PP SPQR" RSC 276 type

 

Here is a comparison of the “limes” denarius (top) with the genuine silver denarius (bottom):

0D6537C3-9C7D-4DA4-A320-F69E8EAF1341.jpeg.73107744b34e12b36fdaa89feb6ea5ca.jpeg

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Finally got around to getting this type. Unfortunate that the Scylla is somewhat flat but I still think it is a very appealing example.

image.jpeg.6b49305ea2b882199d273c21bf728845.jpeg

Roman Imperators. Sextus Pompey. AR Denarius. Military mint in Sicily(?), 42-40 BC. Pharos of Messana, surrmounted by statue of Neptune holding trident and standing on prow, [MAG·]PIVS - IMP·ITER / Scylla, PRA͡EF·CLAS·ET·O[RA͡E·M͡A͡RIT·EX·S·C] 18 mm, 3.73 g. Crawford 511/4a. Ex Münzhandlung Ritter, List 38, April 1995, Lot 512.

image.png.a6c01c0af79dedc66b90b5e1892dd802.pngimage.png.8d69f0ddd0250b70fc0fa23b1fe78322.png

 

BTW, should anyone have access to Ritter FPL 38 please let me know! Schaefer included clippings from the sale that included my coin but it can sometimes be a little hard to definitively work out his handwriting.

image.png.a6cfb3e60c2fe3630cafde918b2d05df.png

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