Jump to content

Post your latest ancient!


CPK

Recommended Posts

The other 2 coins that came with my Magnus Maximus. Husband and wife: Theodosius I and Aelia Flaccilla.

 

AeliaFlaccillaAE23378-388ADSALVSREIPVBLICAECONE.png.71fd8ef43f1906fc90df2ae66f318bba.png

Aelia Flaccilla
AE 23mm
Obverse: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right
Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing Chi-Rho on shield
Mintmark CON Epsilon

 

TheodosiusIFollis392-395ADGLORIAROMANORVMCONS.png.ee3f02765c67d3c090ecb4077b3887f0.png

Theodosius I
AE2
392-395 AD
Obverse: DN THEODO-SIVS PF AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust, right
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor standing facing, head right., holding standard and globe
Mintmark: CONS(delta)

  • Like 15
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beware of Greeks bearing gifts, Vergil already knew something similar.

Pamphylia, was a small region on the southern coast of Anatolia, extending about 120 km (75 miles) between Lycia and Cilicia, and north from the Mediterranean only about 50 km (30 miles) to mountainous Pisidia. The Pamphylians were a mixture of aboriginal inhabitants, immigrant Cilicians and Greeks who migrated there from Arcadia and Peloponnese in the 12th century B.C. The region first enters history in a treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, where the city "Parha" (Perge) is mentioned. Pamphylia was subdued by the Mermnad kings of Lydia and afterward passed in succession under the dominion of Persian and Hellenistic monarchs. After the defeat of Antiochus III in 190 B.C. they were annexed by the Romans to the dominions of Eumenes of Pergamum; but somewhat later they joined with the Pisidians and Cilicians in piracy, and Side became the chief center and slave mart of these freebooters. Pamphylia was for a short time included in the dominions of Amyntas, king of Galatia, but after his death was absorbed into a Roman province. The Pamphylians became largely Hellenized in Roman times, and have left magnificent memorials of their civilization at Perga, Aspendos, and Side.

 

PAMPHYLIA, GREEK COINS GRIECHISCHE MÜNZEN; Magsitrate: Deino[...?]; Mint: Side, Pamphylia; Date: c. 205/100 BC; Nominal: Tetradrachm; Material: Silver; Diameter: 30.2mm; Weight: 16.95g; Reference: Seyrig Side 8; Reference: SNG BN 678-81; Reference: SNG France 678-81; Reference: SNG von Aulock 4787; Reference: SNG Copenhagen 393-4; Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right; Reverse: Nike advancing left, holding wreath; pomegranate to left; Inscription: ΔΕΙ ΝΟ; Translation: DEI NO; Translation: Magistrate Deino[...?].
 
PAMPHYSNG678.png.761da96c9720d7e7e57d4706463f9575.png
 
  • Like 12
  • Heart Eyes 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cleaning some LRBs from a lot of uncleaned and I came across a coin I haven’t come across previously. As with almost all the LRBs I find,I assume, especially because the condition, it’s not worth more than a few bucks. 
 

I do like it though as it was so heavily encrusted with malachite and other corrosion, that I do feel accomplished in saving it. Much more so than a Constantius II.

Licinius II - AE3 - 321AD  RIC VII Thessalonica 119

Mint
Thessalonica
Obverse
LICINIVS IVN NOB CAES: Bust of Licinius II, laureate, draped, cuirassed, left
Reverse
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM: VOT/V within a laurel wreath
Reverse Legend
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
 
IMG_5874.jpeg.151cf8b7264e2fdb233e6305410d3f6b.jpegIMG_5875.jpeg.c93e9d39cceed236edcf7ead7c4f423a.jpeg
  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

image.png.e1f62edbacf01e498456a3ce8ad721da.png

Srilanka (Ceylon), Kingdom of Polonnaruwa, Queen Lilavati (11-12 Century AD), Copper Kahavanu 4.25g

Obv: king standing facing front, holding a lamp in his right hand and a flower in his left hand

Rev: seated king facing right, left arm raised upward, holding a shell, right arm holding a hanging lamp, Nagari legend at right "'Sri Raja Lila vati"

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

A Vespasian denarius, the first of the four ancient coins I bought at the NYINC yesterday that I've had a chance to write up and try to photograph.

I decided that I liked it and wanted to buy it because (1) it's a reverse type that wasn't familiar to me and depicts animals, always a favorite type of mine even when the animals aren't exotic, (2) I previously had only one lifetime Vespasian denarius (the common type with a curule chair); (3) I liked the portrait, even though the obverse is a bit rough/porous; (4) even though the reverse is way off center, the oxen's heads are still on the flan and one can even see their faces; and (5) Dr. Dieterle gave me a good price for it.

Vespasian AR Denarius AD 77-78, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG / Rev. Pair of oxen, yoked, to left; in exergue, COS VIII. 17x18 mm., 3.04 g., 6 hr. RIC II-1 Vespasian 943 (p. 127) (2007 ed.); RSC II 133a; BMCRE II Vespasian 206 (p. 38) (ill. Pl. VI.9); Sear RCV I 2289 (p. 435). “Worn die on obverse around wreath.” Purchased from Dr. Martina Dieterle, Schenkenzell, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, 12 Jan. 2024 (at NYINC 2024).

COMBINED2Vespasian-oxen(obv2rev2).jpg.003d2afff160edc0602dffecc16f0e04.jpg

Edited by DonnaML
  • Like 18
  • Heart Eyes 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

Another purchase I made yesterday at the NYINC. I love the portrait -- that shiny bald head! -- as well as the rather unusual-looking reverse.

Divus Carus (issued by Carinus), Billon Tetradrachm, undated (struck Autumn AD 283 [death of Carus] - Spring 285 [death of Carinus]), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, ΘΕω ΚΑΡω ϹΕΒ / Rev. Flaming altar tied with garland; star to left of flame; ΑΦΙΕΡ-ωϹΙϹ [Consecration, Dedication = Latin Consecratio] around altar. 18 mm., 6.64 g. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. X Online 75880 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/75880 ); BMC 16 Alexandria 2446 p. 316 (ill. Pl. XXX) (possible rev. die match?; ill at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coin/376891 as primary specimen of RPC type 75880) [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London, 1892)]; Milne 4733 (possible rev. die match?; ill. at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coin/376905  as 18th specimen of RPC type 75880) [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; K & G 113.5 (ill. p. 341) [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria  (2008)]; Emmett 3995 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; Dattari (Savio) 5570-71 [Savio, A. ed., Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini (Trieste, 2007)]; Köln 3167-68 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band 4 Claudius Gothicus – Nachträge (1983)]. Purchased from Herakles Numismatics (Perry Siegel), Charlotte, NC, 12 Jan 2024 (at 2024 NYINC).

CarinustetradrachmRomanAlexandriaflamingaltarreverse(HeraklesNumismatics).jpg.df8493f5c5362571d7dc5edeeb93d00e.jpg

As far as the possible reverse die matches I noted are concerned, the placement of the letters differs slightly, but the altars and flames themselves are certainly quite close:

BMC:

image.png.bab01b78be000f03b99bfc74d674b25c.png

 

Milne:

image.png.971eb8f21fec264faa5ab982b91526a8.png

  • Like 15
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought the atoninianus for the nice galley reverse and to make a pair with my sestertius bought some years ago.The sertertius looks much better in hand.
    
Postumus AR Antoninianus. RIC 73
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / 
LAETITIA AVG, galley left with four rowers and pilot. 
23 mm / 2.6 g

image.jpeg.6988985d1e6324d4556304dc89644db0.jpeg

    
Postumus AE Double Sestertius. RIC 143
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / 
LAETITIA AVG, Galley right with three or four rowers, sometimes with steersman.

image.jpeg.c541b656d2a2ddd7d92f6b2f7cd99a35.jpeg

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, DonnaML said:

A Vespasian denarius, the first of the four ancient coins I bought at the NYINC yesterday that I've had a chance to write up and try to photograph.

I decided that I liked it and wanted to buy it because (1) it's a reverse type that wasn't familiar to me and depicts animals, always a favorite type of mine even when the animals aren't exotic, (2) I previously had only one lifetime Vespasian denarius (the common type with a curule chair); (3) I liked the portrait, even though the obverse is a bit rough/porous; (4) even though the reverse is way off center, the oxen's heads are still on the flan and one can even see their faces; and (5) Dr. Dieterle gave me a good price for it.

Vespasian AR Denarius AD 77-78, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG / Rev. Pair of oxen, yoked, to left; in exergue, COS VIII. 17x18 mm., 3.04 g., 6 hr. RIC II-1 Vespasian 943 (p. 127) (2007 ed.); RSC II 133a; BMCRE II Vespasian 206 (p. 38) (ill. Pl. VI.9); Sear RCV I 2289 (p. 435). “Worn die on obverse around wreath.” Purchased from Dr. Martina Dieterle, Schenkenzell, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, 12 Jan. 2024 (at NYINC 2024).

COMBINED2Vespasian-oxen(obv2rev2).jpg.003d2afff160edc0602dffecc16f0e04.jpg

Love that sharp looking portrait! A most handsome denarius. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just won another overstrike from that jerk Kassander. 

This is my third coin of the type. All of which you can easily see the Macedonian shield coin design underneath.

 You can see part of the shield on Athena's helmet and the Herakles boss on the side of her face. On the reverse you can also see the top of a caduceus to the right. All part of the under types designs. 

I do believe they must've intended the week over strike to show Kassander was taking over. That or he just had noodle armed choir boys striking these. Cause I've never seen a type with so many easily identifiable under types:

4977159_1703670897.l.jpg.f664e64b08a66da8a653ff23344541e9.jpg

Kings of Macedon, Kassander, 316-297 BC. Uncertain mint in Western Anatolia. AE. 3.64 Gr. 19mm.

Helmeted head of Athena right.

Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΚΑΣΣΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Club above bow-in-bowcase.

  • Like 12
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Ryro said:

Just won another overstrike from that jerk Kassander. 

This is my third coin of the type. All of which you can easily see the Macedonian shield coin design underneath.

 You can see part of the shield on Athena's helmet and the Herakles boss on the side of her face. On the reverse you can also see the top of a caduceus to the right. All part of the under types designs. 

I do believe they must've intended the week over strike to show Kassander was taking over. That or he just had noodle armed choir boys striking these. Cause I've never seen a type with so many easily identifiable under types:

4977159_1703670897.l.jpg.f664e64b08a66da8a653ff23344541e9.jpg

Kings of Macedon, Kassander, 316-297 BC. Uncertain mint in Western Anatolia. AE. 3.64 Gr. 19mm.

Helmeted head of Athena right.

Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΚΑΣΣΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Club above bow-in-bowcase.

How annoying is that there is no silver(bearing his name) or portrait coins of Kassander??? Grrr

Edited by AETHER
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, AETHER said:

How annoying is that there is no silver(bearing his name) or portrait coins of Kassander??? Grrr

Agreed! The lack of portraiture of some of the Diadochi is awful frustrating. 

Depending on who you read Pyrrhos was the most handsome man since Alexander or the ugliest creature since the Ketos monster! At least he left us a rich amount of cool coins. 

  • Like 1
  • Clap 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

Here's an arrival from Roma, from E-Sale 114, a remainder lot.  The reverse is really cool.

Valerian I, Æ 30mm, Anazarbus, Cilicia. CY 272 (25/-4 AD).

RPC X Online Unassigned ID 60270 (this coin cited).

17.85 grams

Obverse: AVT K Π ΛIK OVAΛЄPIANOC CЄ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust to right.

Reverse: ANAZAPBOV MHTPOΠ, six prize urns, the middle one in upper row containing palm branch; Γ-Γ across upper fields, ET BOC (date) across central field, A M K T in exergue.

D-CameraValerianI30mmAnazarbusCilicia.CY272(253-4AD)RPCXOnlineUnassignedID60270(thiscoincited)17.85g1-14-24.jpg.f396f9b8f288d07d8680fbe51da8b8af.jpg

  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

A third coin that I bought at the NYINC on Friday; I chose it for the unusual reverse -- a large eight-pointed star as the sole design element.

Still a couple to go (one of which is a Napoleonic medal which I'll post in the new Exonumia forum). Plus, the two ancient coins I won at the Nomos AG Obolos 30 auction on 17 December finally arrived today -- since when does the US Post Office deliver on Sundays? -- so I have those to write up as well. I have some work to do! 

Diva Faustina I [Senior] (wife of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius [Sear: AD 142; Dinsdale: undated, Nov. 140 – 161], Rome Mint. Obv. Draped bust right, head veiled, hair  drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil on top, DIVA AVG – FAVSTINA / Rev. Eight-pointed star; AETERNITAS in curved line above; below at 6 o’clock [no authority notes this dot or explains whether it has any intended significance]. 18 mm., 3.06 g. RIC III 355; RSC II Faustina I 63; BMCRE IV 293; Sear RCV II 4580; Dinsdale 019190 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Early Antonines: Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius Caesar (2022), Ch. 7 at p. 232, photo at p. 235] [available at http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Antoninus/old/07%20-%20Diva%20Faustina%20I%20-%20Undated%20140-161%20%28med_res%29.pdf]. Purchased from Herakles Numismatics, Charlotte, NC, 12 Jan 2024 (at 2024 NYINC).

COMBINED2DivaFaustinaIAeternitas(Star).jpg.600c6bc1c79ad51aa89faee035e50116.jpg

@Roman Collector, can you shed any light on the date of this issue, or narrow it down from the broad range Dinsdale assigns to it? (For those Diva Faustina issues to which Dinsdale does attribute a more specific date, all the types with the legend "AETERNITAS" appear to be post-AD 150, if that has any significance.)

Edited by DonnaML
  • Like 12
  • Heart Eyes 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

A third coin that I bought at the NYINC on Friday; I chose it for the unusual reverse -- a large eight-pointed star as the sole design element.

Still a couple to go (one of which is a Napoleonic medal which I'll post in the new Exonumia forum). Plus, the two ancient coins I won at the Nomos AG Obolos 30 auction on 17 December finally arrived today -- since when does the US Post Office deliver on Sundays? -- so I have those to write up as well. I have some work to do! 

Diva Faustina I [Senior] (wife of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius [Sear: AD 142; Dinsdale: undated, Nov. 140 – 161], Rome Mint. Obv. Draped bust right, head veiled, hair  drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil on top, DIVA AVG – FAVSTINA / Rev. Eight-pointed star; AETERNITAS in curved line above; below at 6 o’clock [no authority notes this dot or explains whether it has any intended significance]. 18 mm., 3.06 g. RIC III 355; RSC II Faustina I 63; BMCRE IV 293; Sear RCV II 4580; Dinsdale 019190 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Early Antonines: Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius Caesar (2022), Ch. 7 at p. 232, photo at p. 235] [available at http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Antoninus/old/07%20-%20Diva%20Faustina%20I%20-%20Undated%20140-161%20%28med_res%29.pdf]. Purchased from Herakles Numismatics, Charlotte, NC, 12 Jan 2024 (at 2024 NYINC).

COMBINED2DivaFaustinaIAeternitas(Star).jpg.600c6bc1c79ad51aa89faee035e50116.jpg

@Roman Collector, can you shed any light on the date of this issue, or narrow it down from the broad range Dinsdale assigns to it? (For those Diva Faustina issues to which Dinsdale does attribute a more specific date, all the types with the legend "AETERNITAS" appear to be post-AD 150, if that has any significance.)

Don't confuse this coin with those of the AETERNITAS issue of 150 CE and later; those have the later DIVA FAVSTINA legend.

Beckmann assigns this coin to the earliest issues for the deified empress, whose funeral was 13 November 140 CE. I therefore date the coin to 140-141 CE. Beckmann writes:
 

The denarii, as explained in Chapter 1, are impossible to arrange by die study. But some progress can be made by observing characteristics common with the earliest aurei and sestertii. So to this earliest coinage of Diva Faustina can be added the denarius types showing a star with the legend AETERNITAS (a parallel to the standing figure/AETERNITAS on the gold and bronze) and the type with an eagle and the legend CONSECRATIO (paralleling the eagle and Faustina/CONSECRATIO issues of the bronze).*

Here is my example of the coin.

FaustinaSrAETERNITASstardenariusveiledbust.jpg.78ac7e60b80ac97aee2aa0d1f23f5a28.jpg

Faustina I, 138-140 CE.
Roman AR denarius, 3.47 g, 18.2 mm, 1 h.
Rome, 140-141 CE.
Obv: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, veiled and draped bust, right.
Rev: AETERNITAS around eight-pointed star; dot below.
Refs: RIC 355(b); BMCRE 293-295; Cohen 63; Strack 421; RCV 4580; CRE 124.
Notes: Double die match to BMCRE 294.


The dot in the 6:00 position is worn off on my coin or was too weakly struck to appear, but was on the die, as you can see from the matched reverse die on the British Museum specimen. As far as I know, it has no significance.

*Beckmann, Martin. Diva Faustina: Coinage and Cult in Rome and the Provinces. American Numismatic Society, 2012, p. 21.

Edited by Roman Collector
Clarity
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
16 minutes ago, Roman Collector said:

Don't confuse this coin with those of the AETERNITAS issue of 150 CE and later; those have the later DIVA FAVSTINA legend.

Beckmann assigns this coin to the earliest issues for the deified empress, whose funeral was 13 November 140 CE. I therefore date the coin to 140-141 CE. Beckmann writes:
 

The denarii, as explained in Chapter 1, are impossible to arrange by die study. But some progress can be made by observing characteristics common with the earliest aurei and sestertii. So to this earliest coinage of Diva Faustina can be added the denarius types showing a star with the legend AETERNITAS (a parallel to the standing figure/AETERNITAS on the gold and bronze) and the type with an eagle and the legend CONSECRATIO (paralleling the eagle and Faustina/CONSECRATIO issues of the bronze).*

Here is my example of the coin.

FaustinaSrAETERNITASstardenariusveiledbust.jpg.78ac7e60b80ac97aee2aa0d1f23f5a28.jpg

Faustina I, 138-140 CE.
Roman AR denarius, 3.47 g, 18.2 mm, 1 h.
Rome, 140-141 CE.
Obv: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, veiled and draped bust, right.
Rev: AETERNITAS around eight-pointed star; dot below.
Refs: RIC 355(b); BMCRE 293-295; Cohen 63; Strack 421; RCV 4580; CRE 124.
Notes: Double die match to BMCRE 294.


The dot in the 6:00 position is worn off on my coin or was too weakly struck to appear, but was on the die, as you can see from the matched reverse die on the British Museum specimen. As far as I know, it has no significance.

*Beckmann, Martin. Diva Faustina: Coinage and Cult in Rome and the Provinces. American Numismatic Society, 2012, p. 21.

Thank you so much! I will revise my write-up accordingly, to cite Beckmann.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Thank you so much! I will revise my write-up accordingly, to cite Beckmann.

The more I think about it, the more I am of the opinion that the dot at the 6:00 position is there for symmetry and balance of the reverse design. Without it, the design looks top heavy because of the inscription around the top. 

  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
33 minutes ago, Roman Collector said:

The more I think about it, the more I am of the opinion that the dot at the 6:00 position is there for symmetry and balance of the reverse design. Without it, the design looks top heavy because of the inscription around the top. 

I think this idea makes a lot of sense. The fact that the dot has no substantive meaning is, perhaps, shown by this specimen (sold by NAC in 2014), which simply places the dot at the end of the legend, where it does nothing for the design:

1995921.jpg.bd512a4dee9418f9fdb8f35486aea39d.jpg

Most other engravers of the type seem to have had a better sense of balance and symmetry.

Edited by DonnaML
  • Like 8
  • Clap 1
  • Heart Eyes 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of several received today

RPC Volume: I №: 1568
Reign: Tiberius Persons: Tiberius (Augustus)
City: Thessalonica  Region: Macedonia Province: Macedonia
Denomination: Leaded bronze (22 mm) Average weight: 9.26 g.
Obverse: ΤΙ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ; laureate head of Tiberius, right
Reverse: ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ; bust of Livia, right
Reference: Touratsoglou, Tiberius 1–32 (c. 14–20/23) Specimens: 46

4969518_1703192086.l-removebg-preview.png.08610c264326a49de704916c7d7ec92c.png

  • Like 16
  • Clap 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about this provincial portrait of Nero? I think its a great silver portrait without breaking the bank for a Denarius. 

Also, coins of Nero from Antioch at this time were 80(ish)% silver, per Richard McAlee in his book The Coins of Roman Antioch.

NERO AR silver tetradrachm. Antioch, regnal year 10, Caesarian year 112 (63-64 AD). NERWNOS KAISAROS SEBASTOU, laureate bust right, aegis on shoulder. Reverse - Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, palm to right, BIP. I to left. RPC 4189, Prieur 90. 25mm, 15.0g.

ner4.jpg.f2d415b20a3e628ac5228e5111e12a64.jpg

 

 

  • Like 10
  • Clap 1
  • Heart Eyes 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So happy to have finally won the centerpiece of my collection! ☺️

 

The Caesarians. Julius Caesar. February-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (16.5mm, 4.00 g, 9h). Lifetime issue. Rome mint; L. Aemilius Buca, moneyer. Laureate head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter. Crawford 480/8; Alföldi Type XIV, 19 (A4/R9); CRI 105; Sydenham 1061; RSC 23; RBW 1683. Toned, some weakness, minor obverse die rust. Near VF.

IMG_4465.jpeg

  • Like 15
  • Clap 2
  • Heart Eyes 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Victrix said:

So happy to have finally won the centerpiece of my collection! ☺️

 

The Caesarians. Julius Caesar. February-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (16.5mm, 4.00 g, 9h). Lifetime issue. Rome mint; L. Aemilius Buca, moneyer. Laureate head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter. Crawford 480/8; Alföldi Type XIV, 19 (A4/R9); CRI 105; Sydenham 1061; RSC 23; RBW 1683. Toned, some weakness, minor obverse die rust. Near VF.

IMG_4465.jpeg

Congratulations!

A hammer price of 1300$ for this attractive lifetime portrait is excellent!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This coin from Tarsus, Cilicia (Elagabalus) is one that falls in the category of "coins I never knew I wanted to own until I saw it" and that I would have found exceedingly frustrating to try to find. Features that I like: "A M K" in the middle which boasts: #1 Greatest and Most Beautiful" (A - Greek #1, M - μεγίστης, K - καλλίστης) and the 7 imperial heads - which unfortunately I don't think have been identified more specifically....
image.png.b7bae483d6a1ccdd99c695f01ffc3d28.png
CILICIA, Tarsus. Elagabalus. AD 218-222. Æ 6.11g 23mm
Obv: AVT KAI M AVP ANTWNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: TAPCOV THC MHTROPOLE, Ciliarch crown decorated with seven imperial portraits, ЄΛ, and KOIN monogram; A/MK in center of crown
Ref: SNG Levante 1079
 
Crown of the Ciliciarch crenellated with seven laureate heads of previous emperors. The Ciliciarch was the High Priest of Cilicia who presided over provincial temples dedicated to certain emperors. There are also two monograms on the crown that can be decoded as: ЄΛ and KOIN monogram to ЄΛЄVΘЄPON KOINOBOVΛION (“free session of the assembly”).
  • Like 11
  • Mind blown 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got this from Triton today.....cheap!

Post Gupta/ Samatatas of Bengal/ Khaga Dynasty

AV Dinara ND/ NM

Prithubhatta I 695-715

5.78g.     23mm.     .558     11h

LOW 75    ATEC 5294   SAM 19.2

Stylized Archer standing/ facing/ Head L/holding Bow & Arrow/ 

standard L/  "SRI" to upper L/ "JA" between Legs/ PR/ THU/ BA/ TA in

Eastern Brahmi to R

Stylized Goddess standing R/ Pseudo Letters to R

5401_1.jpg

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...