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The last one before weekend 😉 

 

Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus; Reign: Gordianus I AfricanusMint: Rome; Date: 238 AD; Nominal: Sestertius; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 30mm; Weight: 18.52g; Reference: BMC 5; Reference: Cohen 6; Reference: RIC IV Gordian I 9; Pedigree: Busso & Peus Numismatik Frankfurt, Germany (Auction 405, Lot 2647, 02. November 2011); Obverse: Bust of Gordian I, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right; Inscription: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG; Translation: Imperator Caesar Marcus Antonius Gordianus Africanus Augustus; Translation: Imperator, Caesar, Marcus Antonius Gordianus Africanus, Augustus; Reverse: Providentia, draped, standing left with legs crossed, leaning left arm on column, holding wand in right hand over globe and cornucopiae in left hand; Inscription: PROVIDENTIA AVGG S C; Translation: Providentia Augustorum Senatus Consultum; Translation: Foresight of the Augustii. Decree of the senate.
 

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8 hours ago, DonnaML said:

My local post office rarely leaves those slips of paper anymore ever since the pandemic began, and when they do, and I fill them out, the package usually doesn't ever get redelivered. So I have to go pick it up. The good news is that "signature required" instructions by the sender are almost never followed anymore, and even though the tracking history will still say "left with individual," that translates to "left in mailbox." They don't even try to get a signature.

Sadly, the "signature required" requirement is still alive and well in my area and that's why I have to go pick up the package. I've tried the re-delivery option and if the carrier can't get a live signature then they try 2 more times and it ends up back at the post office. I live in a condo and we have no door buzzers (we removed them for security reasons), but the carrier said I could just leave my mobile number in the box and he claimed he would call me if he needed a signature. But I have yet to receive a call. So, that's my situation, unfortunately.

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9 hours ago, DonnaML said:

My local post office rarely leaves those slips of paper anymore ever since the pandemic began, and when they do, and I fill them out, the package usually doesn't ever get redelivered. So I have to go pick it up. The good news is that "signature required" instructions by the sender are almost never followed anymore, and even though the tracking history will still say "left with individual," that translates to "left in mailbox." They don't even try to get a signature.

Where I live we have a centralized system of mailboxes for each residence so you have to go to the mailboxes to get your mail using a key. Signature required slips are left in the mailbox and there is never an attempt to re-deliver, so I have to go to the post office to retrieve these items, including coin shipments that require a signature. Other coins without a required signature are usually just left in the mailbox by the mail carrier.

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An inexpensive pick up for my first coin with a Centaur.

Gallienus AE Antoninianus. Sole reign 260-268AD.
GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right / APOLLINI CONS AVG, Centaur walking left, holding globe and trophy. Mintmark H in exergue. RIC 164a, Cohen 74, RSC 74. Sear 10177.

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Edited by expat
took own photos, auction house ones were awful
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14 hours ago, ewomack said:

I live in a condo and we have no door buzzers (we removed them for security reasons), but the carrier said I could just leave my mobile number in the box and he claimed he would call me if he needed a signature. But I have yet to receive a call. So, that's my situation, unfortunately.

We have buzzers in my apartment building, although once the mail person is inside, they could just take the elevator up to my floor. Even though I'm often home during the day since I retired, never once has any mail person ever tried to do either.  Even for registered mail. Whatever they put down in their computer!  They used to leave the redelivery slip in my mailbox, but never redelivered.

As I said, though, since 2020 they've just left everything in my mailbox, which is kept locked (I have a key, of course) so it's reasonably safe in there. The only problems have been on the several occasions when the tracking information says a package was delivered and "left with an individual," but it wasn't, and it's not in the mailbox either. Fortunately, it's usually turned up in the mail the following day.

The only outfit that actually comes upstairs and rings my doorbell and has me sign a receipt is UPS.  Fedex, only once in a blue moon.

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Today something from the Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus with a beautiful brown patina and a nice colouring - I think... but tastes are different.

Pairisades I; Reign: Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus (Bosporos); Mint: Pantikapaion; Date: circa 310/303 BC; Nominal: Tetrachalcon; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 20mm; Weight: 6.44g; Reference: MacDonald 69; Reference: SNG BM Black Sea 869-871; Obverse: Head of Pan to the right; Reverse: Protome of a griffin to the left, below sturgeon to the left; Inscription: П · А · N; Translation: PAN; Translation: Pantikapaion.

The Bosporan Empire (Latin: Regnum Bospori) was an ancient Hellenistic kingdom on both sides of the Cimmerian Bosporus, which was formed in the 5th century BC from the Greek colonies in the northern Black Sea region and on the coasts of the Sea of Azov. After a phase of economic and associated military decline in the 3rd century BC, the empire was annexed by the kingdom of Pontus around 107 BC. After the incorporation of Pontus into the Roman Empire by Pompey, the Bosporan Empire once again became a state in its own right, but was dependent on Rome. In the 1st and 2nd centuries AD, the empire regained strength under the rule of a Sarmatian dynasty, but was often subject to raids by neighbouring tribes. The kingdom was crushed by the Goths and the Huns during the migration of peoples in the 4th and 5th centuries.

After the fall of the Archaianaktids in 438 BC, the empire was, according to Diodorus, under the rule of the Thracian Spartokids, who were to reign for more than three hundred years. The circumstances that led to the change of dynasty are unknown. The names of the founder of the dynasty - Spartokos - and some of his successors are Thracian and are increasingly evidence of the Greeks' interest in the Black Sea region. This is also documented by the frequent mention of the cities. The Spartokids and especially Satyros I, Leukon I (389/8-349/8 BC) and his son Pairisades I (349/8-311/10 BC) were able to extend the borders of the empire with the help of a large mercenary army. In the second half of the 3rd century BC, the Bosporan Empire began to weaken economically, which also had an unfavourable effect on its military strength. The fight against the nomadic raids became difficult. The Scythian threat to the existence of the empire became so great that Pairisades V (ca. 125-108 BC) abdicated his throne and offered power to Mithridates VI of Pontus. This capitulation policy of the last Spartokids provoked an uprising among the lower classes, including numerous slaves who made common cause with the Scythians. The Scythian population of Pantikapaion, led by the slave Saumakos (Sawmak), was at the forefront of this popular movement. Pairisades was killed by the rebels. The uprising was finally put down by the troops of Mithridates and the Bosporan state was incorporated into the Pontic Empire.

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Just got home from 5 days with the inlaws and was rewarded...I mean it was in my mailbox....with this coin. There were actually 3 in the lot but I bid specifically for this one. I probably overpaid but I'd never seen one before sooooo.....

 

SicilyHimerac.425-409BC.TetrasYouthridinggoatNike.png.ef4dbb4cd6ba0af5115b6911aa204a2f.png

Sicily, Himera
c. 425-409 BC
Æ Tetras
Obverse: Nude rider on a goat left, blowing into conch; three pellets below
Reverse: Nike advancing left, holding open wreath

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A recent addition to my handful of Syro-Phoenician tetradrachms with eagles on the reverse, all from the 3rd century CE. Hardly comparable to @Al Kowsky's wonderful collection, but I'm happy with them nonetheless!

Macrinus Billon Tetradrachm, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch Mint, A.D 217-218. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from three-quarters front, AVT•  K• M• OΠ CE• MAKPINOC CEB [Autokrator Kaisaros Markos Opellios Makrinos Sebastos] / Rev. Eagle with spread wings standing facing on leg and thigh of a sacrificial animal, head to right and holding wreath in beak; •ΔΗΜΑΡΧ• ƐΞ• - VΠA•TO: [equivalent of TR P COS; ref. to tribunician power; consul]; in field to left and right of eagle’s neck, •Δ• and •Ɛ•. McAlee 721 (ill. p. 279) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; Prieur 246 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]. 26 mm., 12.88 g., 6 hr. Purchased from Kinzer Coins, Mt. Vernon, MO, 19 Nov. 2023; ex cgb.fr (Compagnie Générale de Bourse), Paris, France (retail purchase Nov. 2022).*

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*Macrinus “was born in Caesarea (modern Cherchell, Algeria) in the Roman province of Mauretania Caesariensis to an equestrian family of Berber origins”; he was “the first emperor who did not hail from the senatorial class and also the first emperor who never visited Rome during his reign.” See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrinus. Instead, he spent most of his brief tenure as emperor in Antioch, which “effectively functioned as the administrative center of the empire during his reign.” (McAlee p. 278.)

Regarding the “eagle on leg and thigh of sacrificial animal” motif, introduced under Hadrian, see McAlee p. 216:

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Regarding the significance of the Delta and Epsilon across the reverse fields on either side of the eagle’s neck, see McAlee’s discussion of those letters in connection with the late tetradrachms of Macrinus’s predecessor Caracalla, on which they first appeared. He explains that “the letters ΔЄ each have a dot to either side. They probably stand for ‘Δ ЄΠΑΡΧЄIΧΩN’ (of the four eparchies, thereby signifying that the coins were valid currency throughout the province of Syria.” See McAlee p. 270 n. 131 (footnoting McAlee 681); see also the discussion at McAlee p. 265, using the presence of ΔЄ to narrow down the probable dates of the types bearing it: “All of Caracalla’s billon tetradrachms are dated COS IV (213-217), but most of them were probably struck during 215-217, when the emperor was present in person in the east and preparations for the Parthian campaign were underway. . . . The tetradrachms with ΔЄ are very similar to the Antiochene tetradrachms of Macrinus, Caracalla’s successor, so they must have been struck at the end of Caracalla’s reign, c. 216-217. The coins without ΔЄ were probably struck somewhat earlier, and are here dated to c. 214-215, although they may not have commenced until 215, when Caracalla arrived in Antioch. The coins with ΔЄ may have been produced for civilian use, as opposed to military pay. They were probably struck at the same time as the special wartime series of tetradrachms discussed below, which do not have the letters ΔЄ.” 

McAlee’s full elaboration of his position regarding the significance of the Delta-Epsilon can be found at pp. 5-6 of his book. Note particularly the final paragraph, stating that the letters ΔЄ “first appeared on tetradrachms of Caracalla which were probably struck during 216-217 (nos. 681-682), at the same time as a special wartime series of tetradrachms (nos. 683-694) which did not have the letters ΔЄ”:

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McAlee’s book was published in 2007. Barbara Lichocka takes a different position from McAlee on the significance of the Delta-Epsilon in her 2011 article "Delta-Epsilon issues of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander," at pp. 287-323 of the book Classica Orientalia: Essays Presented to Wiktor Andrzej Daszewski on his 75th Birthday (Polish Center of Mediterranean Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Nov. 2011). See pp. 293-295: 

“The interpretation of the meaning of the letters on the reverse is controversial. A  fairly common reading has ΔЄ standing for Δημαρχικής Eξουσίας, equivalent of tribunitia potestas (see Westholm 1936: 135; 1937: 530; Hill 1972: 235 note 3, Elagabalus; Lichocka 1999: 176–177; Amandry 1993: 17; Parks 2005: 132; Pitsillides 2004: 40 No. 77). Indication of tribunal power in abbreviated form, TR P, TR POT was common on Roman imperial coins, but ordinarily with a numeral to express successive resumptions of office. For the first year the numeral was omitted (see RIC IV/2: 27–42, 69, 71–80, 90–91). Although omission of the numeral on coins struck also after the first regnal year, for example, on the obverses of bronzes of Vespasian (RIC II: 66), has been noted, it should be emphasized that the title appeared always together with other titles of the emperor as part of the legend.”

McAlee’s interpretation makes more sense to me, although I am hardly an expert on the subject. It seems rather unlikely that the Delta-Epsilon was simply an indication of the tribunician power of the emperor in the form of an abbreviation for ΔΗΜΑΡXKCH, etc. If so, the letters would have been redundant on coins, such as this one, that already set forth the tribunician power in their legends.

 With the others I have. All right-facing!

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Edited by DonnaML
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And from me, as my conclusion, an new buy / entry today from three Republicans. A triple group of iridescent coloured coins. Description and pictures in order.

Aulus PlautiusReign: Roman Republic; Mint: Rome; Date: 55 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 18mm; Weight: 3.90g; Reference: Sydenham 932; Reference: Babelon Plautia 13; Reference: Crawford RRC 431/1; Pedigree: Ex Galata Coins England, February 1978; Obverse: Head of Cybele, right, wearing turreted crown. Border of dots; Inscription: A PLAVTIVS AED CVR S C; Translation: Aulus Plautius Aedile Curule Senatus Consulto; Translation: Aulus Plautius Aedile Curule, by Decree of the Senate; Reverse: Camel, right; before, kneeling figure holding reins in left hand and olive-branch in right hand. Border of dots; Inscription: BACCHIVS IVDAEVS; Translation: Bacchius Iudaeus; Translation: Bacchius the Jew.

Gaius Julius CaesarReign: Roman Republic, Civil War; Mint: Military mint, traveling Spain with Julius Caesar; Date: 46/45 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 18mm; Weight: 4.02g; Reference: Sydenham 1014; Reference: BMCRR Spain 86; Reference: Crawford RRC 468/1; Pedigree: Ex Downies Australian Coin Auctions, Melbourne, Auction 244, year 1988; Obverse: Head of Venus, right, wearing diadem; behind, Cupid. Border of dots; Reverse: Trophy with oval shield and carnyx in each hand; on left, seated female captive resting head in right hand; on right, bearded captive seated with hands tied behind back. Border of dots; Inscription: CAESAR; Translation: [Gaius Julius] Caesar.

Lucius Thorius BalbusReign: Roman Republic; Mint: Rome; Date: 105 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 20mm; Weight: 3.99g; Reference: Sydenham 598; Reference: Babelon Thoria 1; Reference: Crawford RRC 316/1; Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, right, wearing goat-skin. Border of dots; Inscription: I S M R; Translation: Iuno Sospita Magna Regina; Translation: Great Queen Juno the Saviour; Reverse: Bull charging right. Border of dots; Inscription: L THORIVS; Translation: Lucius Thorius [Balbus].

 

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6 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

And from me, as my conclusion, an new buy / entry today from three Republicans. A triple group of iridescent coloured coins. Description and pictures in order.

Aulus PlautiusReign: Roman Republic; Mint: Rome; Date: 55 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 18mm; Weight: 3.90g; Reference: Sydenham 932; Reference: Babelon Plautia 13; Reference: Crawford RRC 431/1; Pedigree: Ex Galata Coins England, February 1978; Obverse: Head of Cybele, right, wearing turreted crown. Border of dots; Inscription: A PLAVTIVS AED CVR S C; Translation: Aulus Plautius Aedile Curule Senatus Consulto; Translation: Aulus Plautius Aedile Curule, by Decree of the Senate; Reverse: Camel, right; before, kneeling figure holding reins in left hand and olive-branch in right hand. Border of dots; Inscription: BACCHIVS IVDAEVS; Translation: Bacchius Iudaeus; Translation: Bacchius the Jew.

Gaius Julius CaesarReign: Roman Republic, Civil War; Mint: Military mint, traveling Spain with Julius Caesar; Date: 46/45 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 18mm; Weight: 4.02g; Reference: Sydenham 1014; Reference: BMCRR Spain 86; Reference: Crawford RRC 468/1; Pedigree: Ex Downies Australian Coin Auctions, Melbourne, Auction 244, year 1988; Obverse: Head of Venus, right, wearing diadem; behind, Cupid. Border of dots; Reverse: Trophy with oval shield and carnyx in each hand; on left, seated female captive resting head in right hand; on right, bearded captive seated with hands tied behind back. Border of dots; Inscription: CAESAR; Translation: [Gaius Julius] Caesar.

Lucius Thorius BalbusReign: Roman Republic; Mint: Rome; Date: 105 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 20mm; Weight: 3.99g; Reference: Sydenham 598; Reference: Babelon Thoria 1; Reference: Crawford RRC 316/1; Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, right, wearing goat-skin. Border of dots; Inscription: I S M R; Translation: Iuno Sospita Magna Regina; Translation: Great Queen Juno the Saviour; Reverse: Bull charging right. Border of dots; Inscription: L THORIVS; Translation: Lucius Thorius [Balbus].

 

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There were some decent deals at Pegasus today- Plautius was on my watch list. At 150 Euro it was fairly decent purchase…

Edited by El Cazador
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5 hours ago, DonnaML said:

A recent addition to my handful of Syro-Phoenician tetradrachms with eagles on the reverse, all from the 3rd century CE. Hardly comparable to @Al Kowsky's wonderful collection, but I'm happy with them nonetheless!

Macrinus Billon Tetradrachm, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch Mint, A.D 217-218. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from three-quarters front, AVT•  K• M• OΠ CE• MAKPINOC CEB [Autokrator Kaisaros Markos Opellios Makrinos Sebastos] / Rev. Eagle with spread wings standing facing on leg and thigh of a sacrificial animal, head to right and holding wreath in beak; •ΔΗΜΑΡΧ• ƐΞ• - VΠA•TO: [equivalent of TR P COS; ref. to tribunician power; consul]; in field to left and right of eagle’s neck, •Δ• and •Ɛ•. McAlee 721 (ill. p. 279) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; Prieur 246 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]. 26 mm., 12.88 g., 6 hr. Purchased from Kinzer Coins, Mt. Vernon, MO, 19 Nov. 2023; ex cgb.fr (Compagnie Générale de Bourse), Paris, France (retail purchase Nov. 2022).*

 image.png.118972c6cda815f1acc60732125ad699.png

*Macrinus “was born in Caesarea (modern Cherchell, Algeria) in the Roman province of Mauretania Caesariensis to an equestrian family of Berber origins”; he was “the first emperor who did not hail from the senatorial class and also the first emperor who never visited Rome during his reign.” See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrinus. Instead, he spent most of his brief tenure as emperor in Antioch, which “effectively functioned as the administrative center of the empire during his reign.” (McAlee p. 278.)

Regarding the “eagle on leg and thigh of sacrificial animal” motif, introduced under Hadrian, see McAlee p. 216:

image.png.29b75c610c0e3082a3f20f465314a99c.png

Regarding the significance of the Delta and Epsilon across the reverse fields on either side of the eagle’s neck, see McAlee’s discussion of those letters in connection with the late tetradrachms of Macrinus’s predecessor Caracalla, on which they first appeared. He explains that “the letters ΔЄ each have a dot to either side. They probably stand for ‘Δ ЄΠΑΡΧЄIΧΩN’ (of the four eparchies, thereby signifying that the coins were valid currency throughout the province of Syria.” See McAlee p. 270 n. 131 (footnoting McAlee 681); see also the discussion at McAlee p. 265, using the presence of ΔЄ to narrow down the probable dates of the types bearing it: “All of Caracalla’s billon tetradrachms are dated COS IV (213-217), but most of them were probably struck during 215-217, when the emperor was present in person in the east and preparations for the Parthian campaign were underway. . . . The tetradrachms with ΔЄ are very similar to the Antiochene tetradrachms of Macrinus, Caracalla’s successor, so they must have been struck at the end of Caracalla’s reign, c. 216-217. The coins without ΔЄ were probably struck somewhat earlier, and are here dated to c. 214-215, although they may not have commenced until 215, when Caracalla arrived in Antioch. The coins with ΔЄ may have been produced for civilian use, as opposed to military pay. They were probably struck at the same time as the special wartime series of tetradrachms discussed below, which do not have the letters ΔЄ.” 

McAlee’s full elaboration of his position regarding the significance of the Delta-Epsilon can be found at pp. 5-6 of his book. Note particularly the final paragraph, stating that the letters ΔЄ “first appeared on tetradrachms of Caracalla which were probably struck during 216-217 (nos. 681-682), at the same time as a special wartime series of tetradrachms (nos. 683-694) which did not have the letters ΔЄ”:

image.png.e8cf5c855d9e42c06238ead71c8a76e1.png

image.png.c9783a175233d39147e2170cd835c5c0.png

McAlee’s book was published in 2007. Barbara Lichocka takes a different position from McAlee on the significance of the Delta-Epsilon in her 2011 article "Delta-Epsilon issues of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander," at pp. 287-323 of the book Classica Orientalia: Essays Presented to Wiktor Andrzej Daszewski on his 75th Birthday (Polish Center of Mediterranean Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Nov. 2011). See pp. 293-295: 

“The interpretation of the meaning of the letters on the reverse is controversial. A  fairly common reading has ΔЄ standing for Δημαρχικής Eξουσίας, equivalent of tribunitia potestas (see Westholm 1936: 135; 1937: 530; Hill 1972: 235 note 3, Elagabalus; Lichocka 1999: 176–177; Amandry 1993: 17; Parks 2005: 132; Pitsillides 2004: 40 No. 77). Indication of tribunal power in abbreviated form, TR P, TR POT was common on Roman imperial coins, but ordinarily with a numeral to express successive resumptions of office. For the first year the numeral was omitted (see RIC IV/2: 27–42, 69, 71–80, 90–91). Although omission of the numeral on coins struck also after the first regnal year, for example, on the obverses of bronzes of Vespasian (RIC II: 66), has been noted, it should be emphasized that the title appeared always together with other titles of the emperor as part of the legend.”

McAlee’s interpretation makes more sense to me, although I am hardly an expert on the subject. It seems rather unlikely that the Delta-Epsilon was simply an indication of the tribunician power of the emperor in the form of an abbreviation for ΔΗΜΑΡXKCH, etc. If so, the letters would have been redundant on coins, such as this one, that already set forth the tribunician power in their legends.

 With the others I have. All right-facing!

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20231126_115503.jpg.ede6f8f882440bef5ec0d5f2686dcaad.jpg

You've got a nice looking group of tetradrachms already 😉. Choice examples of Julia Domna & Geta are not easy to find. I'm still looking for a nice Julia Domna for less than $1,000 🙄...

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3 hours ago, Al Kowsky said:

You've got a nice looking group of tetradrachms already 😉. Choice examples of Julia Domna & Geta are not easy to find. I'm still looking for a nice Julia Domna for less than $1,000 🙄...

Thanks, Al, but I only wish I had Julia Domna and Geta! They're in chronological order, so that's Septimius Severus, Caracalla, Macrinus, Gordian III, Philip I, Otacilia Severa, Philip II, and Trajan Decius.

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I picked up a few coins in London last week from Roma - here are two of them.   The first was in an earlier Roma sale as well, but I suppose it didn't sell.

Moneyer: L. Flaminius Chilo
Coin: Silver Denarius
IIII•VIR / PRI•[FL] - Diademed head of Venus right
L•FLAM[INI?] - Victory in biga, right, holding palm-branch and reins in left hand and whip in right hand
Exergue: [CHILO]
Mint: Rome (43 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.88g / 19mm / 2h
References:
  • RSC 2-2a (Flaminia)
  • Sydenham 1088
  • Crawford 485/2
  • RBW 1700
  • HCRI 171
Provenances:
  • Ex. Collection of a Hanseatic Romanophile, Kuenker, Auction 347, 22-Mar-2021, lot 931
  • Ex. Kuenker, Auction 143, 6-Oct-2008, lot 421
Acquisition: Roma Numismatics Online auction Auction XXIX #415 9-Nov-2023

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And a rare uncia - I think this is my most expensive RR bronze and it's not exactly eye candy:

Gens: Anonymous - Anchor
Coin: Bronze Uncia
- Helmeted head of Roma right; pellet behind
ROMA - Prow of galley right; pellet above; anchor before
Mint: Rome (ca. 169-158 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 4.40g / 18mm / 9h
References:
  • Sydenham 238e
  • Crawford 194/6
  • RBW 836 (this coin)
Provenances:
  • Ex. Andrew McCabe Collection
  • Ex. RBW Collection, NAC Auction 61, 5-Oct-2011, lot 832
Acquisition: Roma Numismatics Online auction Auction XXIX #331 9-Nov-2023

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ATB,
Aidan.

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On 11/26/2023 at 11:24 PM, El Cazador said:

For me lots 2 and 8 were the highlights 

You're right, lot 8 is really beautiful too. So I bought lot 8 in the Pegasus after sale today. Thanks for the tip - I hadn't even thought about this lot... 🙂 

Then I now have a total of four of the iridescent Republicans.

 

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus; Later triumvir, with Marcus Antonius and Octavian; Reign: Roman Republic; Mint: Rome; Date: 61 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 19mm; Weight: 3.88g; Reference: Sydenham 830b; Reference: Babelon Aemilia 22; Reference: Crawford RRC 419/1d ; Pedigree: Ex Giessener Gorny, Auction May 1991, Lot 442; Obverse: Laureate and diademed female head (Roma or Venus Victrix) right; wreath to left, simpulum to right. Border of dots; Reverse: Equestrian statue of Marcus Aemilius Lepidus right, carrying trophy over shoulder. Border of dots; Inscription: M LEPIDVS AN XV PR H O C S; Translation: Marcus Lepidius Annorum Quindecim Progressus Hostem Occidit Civem Servavit; Translation: Marcus Lepidius, while still in his 15th year and still wearing the toga praetexta, killed an enemy in war and saved a citizen from mortal danger.

LEPRRC419-1d.png.406dcf372478e430f701c1953b7bcf25.png

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2 hours ago, Prieure de Sion said:

You're right, lot 8 is really beautiful too. So I bought lot 8 in the Pegasus after sale today. Thanks for the tip - I hadn't even thought about this lot... 🙂 

Then I now have a total of four of the iridescent Republicans.

 

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus; Later triumvir, with Marcus Antonius and Octavian; Reign: Roman Republic; Mint: Rome; Date: 61 BC; Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 19mm; Weight: 3.88g; Reference: Sydenham 830b; Reference: Babelon Aemilia 22; Reference: Crawford RRC 419/1d ; Pedigree: Ex Giessener Gorny, Auction May 1991, Lot 442; Obverse: Laureate and diademed female head (Roma or Venus Victrix) right; wreath to left, simpulum to right. Border of dots; Reverse: Equestrian statue of Marcus Aemilius Lepidus right, carrying trophy over shoulder. Border of dots; Inscription: M LEPIDVS AN XV PR H O C S; Translation: Marcus Lepidius Annorum Quindecim Progressus Hostem Occidit Civem Servavit; Translation: Marcus Lepidius, while still in his 15th year and still wearing the toga praetexta, killed an enemy in war and saved a citizen from mortal danger.

LEPRRC419-1d.png.406dcf372478e430f701c1953b7bcf25.png

Great, congrats! What was the deal 500 euro + 20% fees?

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11 minutes ago, El Cazador said:

Great, congrats! What was the deal 500 euro + 20% fees?

The deal was better, but as a dealer I “have to” keep quiet about it 😄

But so far the first contact with Pegasus has been very good and communicative. If the delivery works, I will be very satisfied with the auction house. Of course I will make videos again.

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This one arrived today. It's a "plate coin" at RPC -- two of them! (#4 and #5).

TranquillinaCyzicusDemeter.jpg.537fd225866255b0a23e89d6e679a3a6.jpg
Tranquillina, 241-244 CE.
Roman provincial Æ 21.3 mm, 5.79 g, 7 h.
Mysia, Cyzicus, Strategos Lepidus.
Obv: Φ ϹΑΒ ΤΡΑΝΚΥΛΛЄΙΝΑΝ, draped bust, right, wearing stephane.
Rev: ϹΤΡ ΛЄΠΙΔΟΥ ΚΥΖΙΚΗΝΩΝΕΩ, Demeter advancing right, holding a torch in each hand.
RPC VII.1, 31; McClean 7608.

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Here's the latest coin I received. I was going to wait to post it until my annual top 10 coins, but I figured why not give a preview! 

 PtolemaicEgypt-PtolemyII-ARTetradrachm-Sidon.jpg.9610fb232f1e4e1aa9c6de6456173792.jpg

Ptolemy II. 285-246 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 14.17 g). Sidon mint. 249-248 BC. Diademed Head of Ptolemy I right, aegis tied around neck, dotted border / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, dotted border, in left field ΣΙ above and ΔΙ below, in right field Λ𝖨. Lorber 539. Svoronos 751.

Many thanks to @rNumis for posting the Vecchi catalogues where I found this coin.

Ex Ed Waddell. Inventory No. 56915.

Ex Pegasi Numismatics (1995).

Ex Italo Vecchi, Sale 5 (5 March 1997), lot 324.

ScreenShot2023-11-28at3_19_01PM.png.a592bae9f46c3880b9bb132a4d040800.png

Edited by Romancollector
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On 11/26/2023 at 9:45 PM, El Cazador said:

There were some decent deals at Pegasus today- Plautius was on my watch list. At 150 Euro it was fairly decent purchase…

Day 1 - participate Auction
Day 2 - get and pay Invoice
Day 3 - FedEx rings at my door and brings the coins

Thats a Service from Pegasus ... in 3 days (include Auction day) from Sweden to Germany. 

And here are the promised videos.

 

 

 

 

... and my personal favorite with this metallic obverse: 

  

 

And - all coins came neatly packaged with the old (!) collector's cards and all other information. That's very nice, some auction houses destroy the old cards or don't include them.

Real praise and a good start for my first auction at Pegasus. I will take part there again.

cards.jpeg.38ec4e91640133e205bd2441afda3ebd.jpeg

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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5 hours ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Day 1 - participate Auction
Day 2 - get and pay Invoice
Day 3 - FedEx rings at my door and brings the coins

Thats a Service from Pegasus ... in 3 days (include Auction day) from Sweden to Germany. 

And here are the promised videos.

 

 

 

 

... and my personal favorite with this metallic obverse: 

  

 

And - all coins came neatly packaged with the old (!) collector's cards and all other information. That's very nice, some auction houses destroy the old cards or don't include them.

Real praise and a good start for my first auction at Pegasus. I will take part there again.

cards.jpeg.38ec4e91640133e205bd2441afda3ebd.jpeg

Nice!👍🏻 

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