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5 hours ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Day 1 - participate Auction
Day 2 - get and pay Invoice
Day 3 - FedEx rings at my door and brings the coins

Thats a Service from Pegasus ... in 3 days (include Auction day) from Sweden to Germany. 

And here are the promised videos.

 

 

 

 

... and my personal favorite with this metallic obverse: 

  

 

And - all coins came neatly packaged with the old (!) collector's cards and all other information. That's very nice, some auction houses destroy the old cards or don't include them.

Real praise and a good start for my first auction at Pegasus. I will take part there again.

cards.jpeg.38ec4e91640133e205bd2441afda3ebd.jpeg

Nice!👍🏻 

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I liked the style. some coins are pleasing to the eye. And then I had to buy them. But as always, it is of course a matter of taste. Some people like it, others don't like it at all... This type commemorates Germanicus' triumph on 26 May 17 AD for his victories over the Germanic tribes and especially for the partial recovery of the legionary eagles lost in the Battle of Varus.

 
Gaius Iulius Caesar Caligula for his father Nero Claudius Germanicus
Reign: Caligula; Mint: Rome; Date: 37/41 AD; Nominal: Dupondius; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 29mm; Weight: 12.30g; Rare: R2; Reference: BMC 93; Reference: Cohen 7; Reference: RIC I (second edition) Gaius/Caligula 57; Obverse: Germanicus, bare-headed and cloaked, standing in quadriga, right, holding eagle tipped sceptre; Inscription: GERMANICVS CAESAR; Translation: Germanicus Caesar; Reverse: Germanicus bare-headed and cuirassed, right, with tunic standing, left, right hand raised and left holding aquila; Inscription: SIGNIS RECEPT DEVICTIS GERM S C; Translation: Signis Recept Divictis Germanis; Translation: Standards recovered from the defeated German.
 

GERMRIC57.png.cbc36e229595f2fa7cb0ddd10c4a35d7.png

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With this, I now have a full set of menander's indic weight tets. this one seems to have traces of overstriking on the obverse. 

image.png.a7d435246f08bf91ad62c6206581094d.png

BAKTRIA, Indo-Greek Kingdom. Menander I Soter. Circa 155-130 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 9.72 g, 12h). Diademed heroic bust left, seen from behind, wearing aegis and brandishing spear / Athena Alkidemos advancing left; monogram to inner right. Bopearachchi 8A; SNG ANS 745-6; HGC 12, 180

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3 hours ago, Prieure de Sion said:

I love these coins from Bactria - they have a very special style. Fantastic. Unfortunately, I have zero knowledge in this area.

Agreed, I think greco-bactrians have some of the best style out there. Unfortunately that is part of why it's typically so expensive. There is a lack of historical records on the history of the region, so it's interesting how much we have to piece together from numismatic evidence, for better or worse.

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AR Denarius 18mm. 3.84g. Rome mint

Head of young Bacchus r., wearing ivy wreath; PANSA behind.

Ceres walking r., holding a torch in each hand, plow to r.; C.VIBIVS C.F.C.N behind.

RSC I Vibia 16; Craw. 449/2

Good VF. Lustrous fields with attractive iridescent multicolor toning. A bit bright under toning. A bit off-center with some porosity at edge.

Ex. Civitas Galleries

B3459B71-C8CA-44A1-A5B9-ACDE32E9ADCA.jpeg

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On 11/30/2023 at 9:54 AM, Cordoba said:

With this, I now have a full set of menander's indic weight tets. this one seems to have traces of overstriking on the obverse. 

image.png.a7d435246f08bf91ad62c6206581094d.png

BAKTRIA, Indo-Greek Kingdom. Menander I Soter. Circa 155-130 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 9.72 g, 12h). Diademed heroic bust left, seen from behind, wearing aegis and brandishing spear / Athena Alkidemos advancing left; monogram to inner right. Bopearachchi 8A; SNG ANS 745-6; HGC 12, 180

Fine example of the type and a most interesting state - the Greek speaking Bactrians of Afghanistan and Northern  India

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AURELIAN (270-275). Antoninianus. Serdica.

Obv: IMP AVRELIANVS AVG.
Radiate and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: ORIENS AVG / XXIS.
Sol standing left, raising hand and holding globe, treading down one of two captives seated on the ground.

RIC V online 2653.

Weight: 4.27 g.
Diameter: 23 mm.

Think this one will look quite pleasing with the toning! 😄

aurelian.png

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I just bought 21 coins in the latest Savoca Blue 185 auction, this one is the crown jewel for sure, I am in love with the portrait. 

 

Amisos, Pontos. 85-65 B.C. AE 25mm, 8.47g

Obverse: Head Mithradates VI as Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy

Reverse: AMIΣOY, Cista mystica with panther skin, diadem and thyrsos. Monogram to left. SNG BMC 1205; Sear Greek 3640

 

 

 

Pontos, Amisos, Dionysos.jpeg

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As always, I like ancient coins with animals on the reverse -- especially animals famous in myth and legend!

Antoninus Pius AE As, AD 143-144, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III / Rev. Great White Sow crouching right under oak tree, suckling four young piglets, two more at right, IMPERA – TOR II above, S C in exergue. RIC III 733, BMCRE IV Antoninus Pius 1624, Sear RCV II 4302 (ill. p. 237), Cohen 450. 28.5 mm., 14.83 g. Purchased Nov. 24, 2023  from Zuzim, Inc., Brooklyn, NY.* 

 image.png.e51fb4876df7b4342d9cc8ee93da0bf7.png

image.png.8a3e386ace0bfaada120972cb3accc69.png

*The large sow suckling her piglets refers to the myth of Aeneas’s landing at and founding of Lavinium with the Penates, and the subsequent dream of the great white sow giving birth to 30 piglets, which foretold the founding by Aeneas’s son Ascanius, 30 years later, of the city of Alba Longa [“Long White”] in the Alban Hills, where the soil was more fertile and where Romulus and Remus were born. See John Melville Jones, A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins (Seaby, London 1990), entry for “Aeneas” at p. 6: “The scene is defined by the presence of a sow and piglets; this illustrates the story of the dream sent to Aeneas, which told him that when he came across a white sow with thirty piglets they would mark the spot where thirty years later [his son] Ascanius would found a city, Alba Longa, from which Rome itself was eventually to be founded.” Subsequently, Aeneas found the sow under an oak tree and sacrificed it. See also this excerpt from a translation of the Aeneid, Book VIII, beginning at line 26 (from https://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/VirgilAeneidVIII.php):

Bk VIII: 26-47 Aeneas’s Dream of Tiberinus

 “It was night, and through all the land, deep sleep gripped weary

creatures, bird and beast, when Aeneas, the leader, lay down

on the river-bank, under the cold arch of the heavens, his heart

troubled by war’s sadness, and at last allowed his body to rest.

Old Tiberinus himself, the god of the place, appeared to him,

rising from his lovely stream, among the poplar leaves

(fine linen cloaked him in a blue-grey

mantle, and shadowy reeds hid his hair),

Then he spoke, and with his words removed all cares:

‘O seed of the race of gods, who bring our Trojan city

back from the enemy, and guard the eternal fortress,

long looked-for on Laurentine soil, and in Latin fields,

here is your house, and your house’s gods, for sure

(do not desist), don’t fear the threat of war,

the gods’ swollen anger has died away.

And now, lest you think this sleep’s idle fancy, you’ll find

a huge sow lying on the shore, under the oak trees,

that has farrowed a litter of thirty young, a white sow,

lying on the ground, with white piglets round her teats,

That place shall be your city, there’s true rest from your labours.

By this in a space of thirty years Ascanius

will found the city of Alba, bright name." 

There’s also an old 2019 thread at Coin Talk discussing this type and the associated myth; https://www.cointalk.com/threads/the-great-sow-of-alba-longa.343315/. The thread’s author  suggests that the type was issued (together with several others) to commemorate the 900th anniversary of Rome’s founding, but given the date assigned to the coin, I’m somewhat skeptical of the theory: the 900th anniversary would have been in AD 148, not AD 143/144.

This is an unusually heavy example, weighing more than any other specimen I found on acsearch.

Edited by DonnaML
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34 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

As always, I like ancient coins with animals on the reverse -- especially animals famous in myth and legend!

Antoninus Pius AE As, AD 143-144, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III / Rev. Great White Sow standing right under oak tree, suckling four young piglets, two more at right, IMPERA – TOR II above, S C in exergue. RIC III 733, BMCRE IV Antoninus Pius 1624, Sear RCV II 4302 (ill. p. 237), Cohen 450. 28.5 mm., 14.83 g. Purchased Nov. 24, 2023  from Zuzim, Inc., Brooklyn, NY.* 

 image.png.e51fb4876df7b4342d9cc8ee93da0bf7.png

image.png.8a3e386ace0bfaada120972cb3accc69.png

*The large sow suckling her piglets refers to the myth of Aeneas’s landing at and founding of Lavinium with the Penates, and the subsequent dream of the great white sow giving birth to 30 piglets, which foretold the founding by Aeneas’s son Ascanius, 30 years later, of the city of Alba Longa [“Long White”] in the Alban Hills, where the soil was more fertile and where Romulus and Remus were born. See John Melville Jones, A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins (Seaby, London 1990), entry for “Aeneas” at p. 6: “The scene is defined by the presence of a sow and piglets; this illustrates the story of the dream sent to Aeneas, which told him that when he came across a white sow with thirty piglets they would mark the spot where thirty years later [his son] Ascanius would found a city, Alba Longa, from which Rome itself was eventually to be founded.” Subsequently, Aeneas found the sow under an oak tree and sacrificed it. See also this excerpt from a translation of the Aeneid, Book VIII, beginning at line 26 (from https://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/VirgilAeneidVIII.php):

Bk VIII: 26-47 Aeneas’s Dream of Tiberinus

 “It was night, and through all the land, deep sleep gripped weary

creatures, bird and beast, when Aeneas, the leader, lay down

on the river-bank, under the cold arch of the heavens, his heart

troubled by war’s sadness, and at last allowed his body to rest.

Old Tiberinus himself, the god of the place, appeared to him,

rising from his lovely stream, among the poplar leaves

(fine linen cloaked him in a blue-grey

mantle, and shadowy reeds hid his hair),

Then he spoke, and with his words removed all cares:

‘O seed of the race of gods, who bring our Trojan city

back from the enemy, and guard the eternal fortress,

long looked-for on Laurentine soil, and in Latin fields,

here is your house, and your house’s gods, for sure

(do not desist), don’t fear the threat of war,

the gods’ swollen anger has died away.

And now, lest you think this sleep’s idle fancy, you’ll find

a huge sow lying on the shore, under the oak trees,

that has farrowed a litter of thirty young, a white sow,

lying on the ground, with white piglets round her teats,

That place shall be your city, there’s true rest from your labours.

By this in a space of thirty years Ascanius

will found the city of Alba, bright name." 

There’s also an old 2019 thread at Coin Talk discussing this type and the associated myth; https://www.cointalk.com/threads/the-great-sow-of-alba-longa.343315/. The thread’s author  suggests that the type was issued (together with several others) to commemorate the 900th anniversary of Rome’s founding, but given the date assigned to the coin, I’m somewhat skeptical of the theory: the 900th anniversary would have been in AD 148, not AD 143/144.

This is an unusually heavy example, weighing more than any other specimen I found on acsearch.

Very nice!

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After years I bought again a coin for my "head" collection.

af.jpg.41ce190dec700f3b741c004784d35b51.jpg

Annia Faustina, Augusta

PHRYGIA. Hierapolis.

Obv.: Diademed and draped bust of Annia Faustina to right; ΑΝΝΙΑ ΦΑΥϹΤЄΙΝΑ ϹЄΒ D.

Rev. Tyche standing front, head to left, holding patera in her right hand and cornucopiae containing infant Plutos with her left; to left, flaming altar., ΙЄΡΑΠΟΛЄΙΤΩΝ ΝЄΩΚΟΡΩ/Ν T

AE,  9.55g, 26.39mm

Ref.: Johnston 35-7. RPC VI online 5444

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Ok, that's mean now. I saw this coin yesterday at an auction house while my girlfriend was sitting next to me on the couch. It has to be said that my girlfriend chases me around the house screaming from time to time, waving her arms wildly and her eyes wide open - this is natural when we are having fun together. So I told her yesterday - look, that's you, if you want to annoy me and run after me! You are a small Celtic deity - the personification of the woman running around the house, screaming and waving her arms. It seems that the Celts used to worship you. Yesterday I got a beating for that, weird. Nevertheless, I had to buy this coin at auction today.

 

Celtic Coins, Central Europe, West Germany (Hessen / Rheinland); Reign: Germania, Anonymous "Tanzendes Männlein" (Dancing man); Mint: Ubii, Ubier; Date: ca. 60/40 BC; Nominal: Quinarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 14mm; Weight: 1.80g; Reference: DT 206; Reference: DLT 9396; Reference: Flesche 408; Provenance: Numismatica Ars Classica Zurich, Switzerland (Auction 6, Lot 1047, 11 March 1993); Provenance: Noonans Mayfair London, Great Britain; Provenance: From the M. Bridgewater Collection; Obverse: Dancing man, holding torque in one hand and serpent in the other which bites towards his face; Reverse: Horse right with spiky mane, head reverted, all within wave-pattern border.
 
ubii.png.81827998960c2466b567df7b00a8dc93.png
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1 hour ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Ok, that's mean now. I saw this coin yesterday at an auction house while my girlfriend was sitting next to me on the couch. It has to be said that my girlfriend chases me around the house screaming from time to time, waving her arms wildly and her eyes wide open - this is natural when we are having fun together. So I told her yesterday - look, that's you, if you want to annoy me and run after me! You are a small Celtic deity - the personification of the woman running around the house, screaming and waving her arms. It seems that the Celts used to worship you. Yesterday I got a beating for that, weird. Nevertheless, I had to buy this coin at auction today.

 

Celtic Coins, Central Europe, West Germany (Hessen / Rheinland); Reign: Germania, Anonymous "Tanzendes Männlein" (Dancing man); Mint: Ubii, Ubier; Date: ca. 60/40 BC; Nominal: Quinarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 14mm; Weight: 1.80g; Reference: DT 206; Reference: DLT 9396; Reference: Flesche 408; Provenance: Numismatica Ars Classica Zurich, Switzerland (Auction 6, Lot 1047, 11 March 1993); Provenance: Noonans Mayfair London, Great Britain; Provenance: From the M. Bridgewater Collection; Obverse: Dancing man, holding torque in one hand and serpent in the other which bites towards his face; Reverse: Horse right with spiky mane, head reverted, all within wave-pattern border.
 
ubii.png.81827998960c2466b567df7b00a8dc93.png

Gorgeous coin, I love the Celtic stuff. Look at the stylization on the little dude and especially the horse! It’s downright modern.

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This is a coin that I've kept an eye on at my local coin shop.  Last weekend I decided now is as good a time as any to pick it up, so here it is. It is somewhat crude, but the centering on both sides is decent. 

Philip II, 246-249 AD, sestertius, Rome.

RIC IV.3-267A  

27.5mm,15.76 grams

Obverse: Bust of Philip II, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right.

Reverse: Philip the Arab and Philip II, seated left, on a curule chair, extending right hand; Philip the Arab, seated right on a curule chair, holds short scepter in left hand.

D-CameraPhilipIIsestertiusRomePhilIandPhilIIseatedrevRICIV.3-267A27.5mm15.76g12-5-23.jpg.844672072ced8ba2c3dbc9e7076417c6.jpg

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I recently picked up two common Fausta coins to pair up with the one I had (eyes looking upward). The first one has Fausta's eyes looking forward. The one below has a very different hairstyle, similar to the type seen on Helena coins. 🙂

image.jpeg

Fausta AE Follis. 324-326 A.D.
Obv: Draped bust of Fausta right "FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG"
Rev: Spes standing left, holding two children "SPES REIPVBLICA", ".DSIS." in exergue
2.74g, 19mm
RIC 205
Aegean Numismatics, Nov 2023.

23-18 Fausta.jpg
Fausta AE Follis. Thessalonica 326-328 A.D.
Obv: diademed bust right. FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG; 
Rev: SPES REI PVBLICAE; In ex: SMTSB; Fausta, stg.l., holding two infants in her arms
19mm, 3.96 gram
RIC 162
Gert Boersema Ancient Coins, Nov 2023.

Edited by happy_collector
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Had a pretty successful day at Noonans auction!
 

  1. The Colkirk Hoard of Late Roman Silver Coins.Roman Imperial Coinage, Arcadius (383-408), Siliqua, Milan, 395-402, d n arcadi-vs p f avg, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, 'Eastern' Pteryges, rev. virtvs ro-manorvm, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding sceptre and Victoriola on globe, md ps in exergue, 1.32g/12h (MC 393, this coin; Hoxne 707 [C]; RIC X p.321, 1227; RSC 27b).
  2. Roman Republican Coinage, Punic wars, Sicily, Denarius, 209-08 BC
  3. Roman Imperatorial Coinage, The Caesarians, Julius Caesar, Denarius, January-February 44, caesar imp, laureate head right, star behind, rev. p sepvllivs [macer], Venus standing left holding Victoriola and sceptre set on star, 3.48g/4h (Craw. 480/5b; CRI 106a; RSC 41).
  4. Roman Imperial Coinage, Nero (54-68), As Caesar, Denarius, Lugdunum, 51, bare-headed and draped bust of the young Caesar right, rev. eqvester ordo principi ivvent in four lines inscribed on shield, 3.46g (RIC Claudius 79; RSC 97).
     
  5. Anglo-Saxon, 9th-10th century, bronze strap ends


 

image00162.jpg

image00194.jpg

image00237.jpg

image00263.jpg

image00591.jpg

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4 hours ago, robinjojo said:

This is a coin that I've kept an eye on at my local coin shop.  Last weekend I decided now is as good a time as any to pick it up, so here it is. It is somewhat crude, but the centering on both sides is decent. 

Philip II, 246-249 AD, sestertius, Rome.

RIC IV.3-267A  

27.5mm,15.76 grams

Obverse: Bust of Philip II, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right.

Reverse: Philip the Arab and Philip II, seated left, on a curule chair, extending right hand; Philip the Arab, seated right on a curule chair, holds short scepter in left hand.

D-CameraPhilipIIsestertiusRomePhilIandPhilIIseatedrevRICIV.3-267A27.5mm15.76g12-5-23.jpg.844672072ced8ba2c3dbc9e7076417c6.jpg

Looks like the same type as the one I bought from Carthago Numismatics that finally arrived after a long and mysterious delay in Customs:

image.png.21661fd20bc9c02eaeee63eafd31c047.png

It definitely shows the figures better than the similar denarius.

 

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2 hours ago, Victrix said:

Had a pretty successful day at Noonans auction!
 

  1. The Colkirk Hoard of Late Roman Silver Coins.Roman Imperial Coinage, Arcadius (383-408), Siliqua, Milan, 395-402, d n arcadi-vs p f avg, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, 'Eastern' Pteryges, rev. virtvs ro-manorvm, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding sceptre and Victoriola on globe, md ps in exergue, 1.32g/12h (MC 393, this coin; Hoxne 707 [C]; RIC X p.321, 1227; RSC 27b).
  2. Roman Republican Coinage, Punic wars, Sicily, Denarius, 209-08 BC
  3. Roman Imperatorial Coinage, The Caesarians, Julius Caesar, Denarius, January-February 44, caesar imp, laureate head right, star behind, rev. p sepvllivs [macer], Venus standing left holding Victoriola and sceptre set on star, 3.48g/4h (Craw. 480/5b; CRI 106a; RSC 41).
  4. Roman Imperial Coinage, Nero (54-68), As Caesar, Denarius, Lugdunum, 51, bare-headed and draped bust of the young Caesar right, rev. eqvester ordo principi ivvent in four lines inscribed on shield, 3.46g (RIC Claudius 79; RSC 97).
     
  5. Anglo-Saxon, 9th-10th century, bronze strap ends


 

image00162.jpg

image00194.jpg

image00237.jpg

image00263.jpg

image00591.jpg

Wow! An excellent assortment! Congratulations!

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3 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Looks like the same type as the one I bought from Carthago Numismatics that finally arrived after a long and mysterious delay in Customs:

image.png.21661fd20bc9c02eaeee63eafd31c047.png

It definitely shows the figures better than the similar denarius.

 

Yes, they're the same type but different dies.  Your coin is really nice!

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26 minutes ago, MrMonkeySwag96 said:

IMG_0802.jpeg.483422c4857883c2469f128d1482e92e.jpeg

Karia. Rhodes. Circa 305-275 BC. AR Didrachm (6.46g, 19mm). Obv.: head of Helios three-quarters right. Rev.: ΡΟΔΙΟΝ, rose with bud on right, grape cluster in left field, E-Y flanking stem. SNG Helsinki 454; Ashton 158; Weber 6716. VF.

How gorgeous, I have a very nice Hemidrachm with a similar design but a didrachm would be amazing. Such a wonderful design with the rose.

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