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I couldn't resist acquiring a couple more coins from the Turner Collection. They're in worse shape than the two I've posted before, but in this case the coin itself is almost of secondary importance to the handwritten labels, both of which are particularly well-preserved:

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DIOCLETIAN, AD 284-305
AE Post-Reform Radiate (20.65mm, 3.00g,1h)
Struck AD 295-298. Heraclea mint
Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Diocletian right
Reverse: CONCORDIA MIL-ITVM, Diocletian, in military attire, standing right, holding short scepter and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, holding long vertical scepter; H A in lower field
References: OCRE VI 21, RCV 12833
From the collection of Commodore Daniel Turner (1794-1850), naval veteran of the War of 1812 and later captain of the USS
Constitution.

The label seems to have been for two coins of Diocletian - the above CONCORDIA, as well as one with another reverse type.

CommodoreTurnertag(Diocletian).jpg.10a389410f8984ec6ecc700d725e960a.jpg

The other coin appears to be an unofficial imitation of an issue for Magnus Decentius Caesar:

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MAGNUS DECENTIUS as Caesar, AD 350-3
AE Barbarous Imitation (22.14mm, 5.06g, 6h)
Likely struck AD 350-3. Imitation of the Lugdunum mint
Obverse: [D N D]ECENTI-VS CAESAR, bare-headed, draped and/or cuirassed bust of Decentius right
Reverse: VICT[? ? ? ? ?] VG ET CES, two Victories standing facing each other, holding between them wreath encircling VOT [? ?] [MVLT] X which is resting on short column; [?]PLG in exergue
These 'unofficial' issues were struck to help alleviate severe local shortages of coinage.
From the collection of Commodore Daniel Turner (1794-1850), naval veteran of the War of 1812 and later captain of the USS
Constitution.

You can see on the label the ghostly outline of the coin, which had sat wrapped up for at least 165 years.

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I found that hard case, screw-down sports card holders work great for storing and displaying these fragile labels.

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And another portrait of the former owner:

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My last 2 purchases of the year came today.  Both of them are good fits for 2 of my favorite sub-collections: Victory and Byzantine overstrikes:

 

Barbarous Imitative of SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE or something along those lines:

BarbarousImmitativeAE4Nike.png.cb2e6a02974f7ee38fff69cdfa1fa6a1.png

Barbarous Imitation
AE4, 15mm/2.17g
Obverse: Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Garbled legend around Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm branch

 

Follis of Basil I and Constantine struck on host coin: Follis of Theophilus. 

BasilIConstantineVIIFollisOverstruckonFollisofTheophilus.png.556ca50194479282741a6031369f9939.png

Basil I & Constantine VII
Follis
Obverse: bASILIO S CONST BASILIS, Basil, crowned, bearded and wearing loros on left and Constantine (much shorter), crowned and wearing loros, on right, seated facing on double throne, holding labarum between them
Reverse: bASILIO-S CONSTAN-TINOS EN OO-bASILEIS R-OMAION in five lines
Overstruck on follis of Theophilus

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A budget Tiberius I could not pass up.. weak reverse but nice portrait and ofc the title of "tribute penny"

TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS laureate head right. 

PONTIF MAXIM, female figure seated right on chair with ornamented legs, holding branch and inverted spear; single exergual line below.

RIC 30; BMCRE 48; RSC 16a 

 

mPj9Sp3jiRn6MQ4s8WrJy7BQ2Fx3Hf.jpg.1019c77ed9a364c930626880380fd2d7.jpg

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A new Faustina II Denarius with Concordia standing, head left.

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Faustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG ANTO-NINI AVG PII FIL, draped bust right
Rev.: CONCOR-DIA, Concordia standing, head left, holding cornucopia and raising skirt with her right hand
Ag, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 501 [S], CRE 166 [R]

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A new coin for my  Artemis collection:

Hierapolis.jpg.635df05b5213199a751cf8f1cd2da37f.jpg

Hierapolis. Valerian I
Obv:  Valerian I, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right., Α Κ Π Λ ΟVAΛЄΡΙΑΝΟC.
Rev: IЄPAΠΟΛЄΙΤΩΝ K ЄΦЄCΙΩΝ ΝЄΟΚΟΡΩΝ / OMONOIA.
Serapis standing right, holding sceptre; to right, facing statue of Artemis Ephesia, with supports

Homonoia of Hierapolis with Ephesus

Ae, 15g,  29.9 mm

Ref.: RPC X, — (unassigned; ID 63141)

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Here's a Saturday purchase from my local coin shop, quite a common coin, but a pleasant example of this often crude coinage.  

Mylasa (Caria), AR drachm, Pseudo-Rhodes issue, 175-150 BC.

1.89 grams

Obverse: Head of Helios with standing eagle on left side of cheek.

Reverse: Rose; monograms in fields, Ξ-A in fields is for the month Ξανθικός (Xanthikos) in the Macedonian calendar, Ξ-A.

D-CameraMylasa(Caria)ARdrachmPseudo-Rhodes140-30BC-Ainfieldsisforthemonth(xanthikos)1.89g12-25-23.jpg.87bf2fcabd818ce313082bbeb390bba8.jpg

Ξανδικός or Ξανθικός, Xandikos or Xanthikos, March, and festival of the month; Xanthika, purifying the army

Edited by robinjojo
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Here's one of my latest additions, and I'll show another next.

This one probably wont end up in my 2023 list - provided two coins that have been stuck in DHL purgatory since December 2, ultimately will show up in my mailbox... 

Its a neatly toned denarius of Manlius Torquatus for Sulla, struck during one of the many, many, many military campaigns at that time. The flan is quite small, 16 mm, and on the reverse some of the devices are not on the flan. Nevertheless, the 'SVLLA' is legible, which is a 'must' for me. The devices that are present on the coin are well struck, with lots of detail remaining. In all: a perfect coin for my collection 🙂

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Here's another coin, I don't believe I've posted before. It's a well known issue struck under the rule of Pontius Pilate. To me personally, a very interesting issue and a must have for my collection. This issue shows the simpulum on the obverse and the grain ears on the reverse. The other type shows a wreath and a Lituus. 

04PontiusPilate.png.024592ef3b3f38179cb56d6d2c567808.png 

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A Prusias I Cholos has found its way into my hands... 

Prusias I Cholos (the Lame; died 182 BC) was king of the kingdom of Bithynia from around 228 BC until his death. He was a son of Ziaelas. An alliance with Philip V of Macedon came about through marriage. When Rhodes was struck by an earthquake in 227 BC, Prusias supported the affected inhabitants of the island. Allied with the Rhodians, he waged war against Byzantium, but was unable to maintain his conquests and had to give them back in 220 BC. Four years later, in 216 BC, he defeated the Celtic tribe of the Aigosages. During the first Macedonian-Roman war, he was allied with King Philip V against Pergamon. He expanded the territory of Bithynia in a series of wars against the Pergamenian king Attalus I and against Heraclea Pontica on the Black Sea. In 202 BC, Philip V gave Prusias the harbour cities of Kios and Myrleia, which were renamed Prusias ad Mare and Apameia in Bithynia. When the Romans fought against the Seleucid king Antiochus III, Prusias remained neutral. Leading representatives of the important Roman patrician family of the Scipiones guaranteed him the preservation of his possessions in 190 BC. The Seleucid ruler, on the other hand, simply demanded his solidarity. Despite the Scipiones' promise, the Roman Senate demanded the following year, 189 BC, that Prusias return Phrygia to the Pergamenian king Eumenes II. This led to a war between Prusias and Eumenes II that lasted five years (until 183 BC). The Bithynian king granted Hannibal asylum and the latter fought for him against the Attalid. In the end, however, Prusias was forced to renounce Phrygia. In 183 BC, he also had to comply with the request of Titus Quinctius Flamininus, who demanded Hannibal's extradition. However, the Punic general poisoned himself before he could be handed over to the Romans. Prusias I died soon afterwards in 182 BC and was succeeded on the throne by his son Prusias.

GREEK COINS, KINGS OF BITHYNIA; Prusias I Cholos; Reign: Kingdom of Bithynia; Mint: Bithynia; Date: 228/185 BC; Nominal: Tetradrachm; Material: Silver; Diameter: 34mm; Weight: 16.90g; Reference: HGC 7, 614; Reference: Waddington 9b; Reference: Jameson 1387; Reference: SNG von Aulock 6878; Pedigree: From the Kyrios Collection; Obverse: Diademed head of Prusias with short beard, right; Reverse: Zeus Stratios standing left holding a wreath over the royal name in his left hand and a vertical sceptre in left, thunderbolt inner left filed above ME, ligate, monogram below; Inscription: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΡΟΥΣΙΟΥ; Translation: Basileos Prousiou; Translation: King Prusias.

 

 

 

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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Two of the ten I am waiting for arrived this morning. Cheap but I don´t have many Greek coins, don´t know much about them, but they feel great to hold and look at.

PHRYGIA. Apameia. Ae (Circa 88-40 BC). Magistrate Attalos, son of Bianor, eglogistes.
Obv: Turreted head of Artemis-Tyche right, with bow and quiver over shoulder.
Rev: AΠAMEΩN / ATTAΛOY BIANOPOΣ.
Marsyas advancing right, playing aulos; menander pattern below.
BMC 62; HGC 7, 674. 5,49 g - 18,77 mm
In Greek mythology, the satyr Marsyas is a central figure in two stories involving music: in one, he picked up the double oboe that had been abandoned by Athena and played it; in the other, he challenged Apollo to a contest of music and lost his hide and life.

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SELEUCIS & PIERIA. Antioch. Ae Tetrachalkon (63-28 BC). Uncertain date.
Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right.
Rev: ANTIOXEΩN THΣ MHTPOΠOΛEΩΣ.
Zeus seated left on throne, holding crowning Nike and sceptre; [date] in exergue 7,64 g - 19,21 mm

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A beautiful large Trajanus Sestertius arrived today. Unfortunately, it is suspected that there is bronze disease on the rim. I'll have to check this more closely next week. For now, the Sestertius will be quarantined over the holidays.
 
Imperator Caesar Nerva Traianus Augustus; Reign: Trajanus; Mint: Rome; Date: 107 AD; Nominal: Sestertius; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 36mm; Weight: 25.53g; Reference: BMC 800; Reference: Banti 133; Reference: Cohen 406; Reference: Woytek 200b; Reference: RIC II Trajan 503 (sestertius); Obverse: Bust of Trajan, laureate, with aegis, right; Inscription: IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P; Translation: Imperator, Caesar, Nervae Traiano Augustus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate, Consul Quintum, Pater Patriae; Translation: Imperator, Caesar, of Nerva Trajan, Augustus, conqueror of the Germans, conqueror of the Dacians, high priest, holder of tribunician power, consul for the fifth time, father of the nation; Reverse: Pax, draped, standing left, holding branch out and downwards in right hand and cornucopiae in left; her right foot treading down Dacian whose head and shoulders only are seen; Inscription: S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI S C; Translation: Senatus Populusque Romanus Optimo Principi. Senatus Consultum; Translation: The senate and the Roman people to the best of princes. Decree of the senate.
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On 12/21/2023 at 2:40 PM, Prieure de Sion said:

Today I received an interesting Gold Tremissis of the Aelia Eudocia. However, I am not sure whether this is really an imperial issue from Constantinopolis. The portrait style is quite different from the usual imperial issues. It has something barbaric about it. Could it therefore perhaps be a barbarian imitation? Or a mint other than Constantinopolis?

 

Aelia Eudocia (Greek Αιλία Ευδοκία, Ailía Eudokía, Middle Greek pronunciation [ɛlía ɛβðɔkía]; born around 400 AD in Athens; died 20 October 460 AD in Jerusalem), before her baptism Athenaḯs (Αθηναΐς), later also Hagía Eudokía (Ἁγία Εὐδοκία, Middle Greek pronunciation [ajía ɛβðɔkía], "holy Eudokia"), was the wife of the Eastern Roman emperor Theodosius II, who reigned from 408 to 450 AD. Aelia Eudocia was born in Athens as the daughter of the pagan rhetoric teacher Leontios and was considered highly educated. She was instrumental in the establishment of the Christian University of Constantinople, which was built as the so-called Athenaeum in 424 AD based on Constantinian beginnings and was the first great intellectual achievement to compile the Codex Theodosianus. Aelia Eudocia herself wrote sacred poems, some of which have been preserved. She sympathised with Miaphysitism, but turned to Orthodoxy at the end of her life. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church and her feast day is 13 August.

Aelia Eudocia, wife of Emperor Theodosius II; Reign: Theodosius II; Mint: Constantinopolis; Date: 425/429 AD; Nominal: Tremissis; Material: Gold; Diameter: 16mm; Weight: 1.38g; Reference: Depeyrot 72/2; Reference: RIC X Theodosius II (East) 253; Obverse: Bust of Eudocia, pearl-diademed, draped, right, wearing necklace and earrings, crowned by Hand of God; Inscription: AEL EVDOCIA AVG; Translation: Aelia Eudocia Augusta; Reverse: Cross within a wreath, mintmark in exergue; Inscription: CONOB✳; Translation: Constantinopolis Obryzum; Translation: Constantinople 1/72 pound pure gold.

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Attention please - this was a "modern" fake:

 

 

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I won this on the 24th and the tracking said it wasn't supposed to arrive until next year. Imagine my surprise when it showed up today. This is my absolute last coin of 2023.

BarbarousImitativeConstantineINummusTwoVictoriesatAltar4.png.728da7431a46ac24e00e2c833536f1da.png

Barbarous Imitative of Constantine I
Follis
~3rd Century AD
Obverse: Laureate, cuirassed bust right in high-crested helmet
Reverse: Two Victories standing facing one another holding shield on altar decorated with X in centre
 

I'm slowly working on my Barbarous Imitative coins with Victory reverses. It is not anywhere near @Victor_Clark's amazing collection over on his website...but it's good to have goals, right? 😛 For what it's worth, I didn't find a match for my coin on his site.  I consider that a win with how many different examples he has!

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PhilipI(244-249)-AEprovincialSestertius-Dacia-28mm_14_79g.1hRxANIIIVarbanov11olivepatina.jpg.02df11a7faeb7762f9f144fad14b6539.jpg

Philip I (244-249). Dacia. Æ (28mm, 14.79g, 1h). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust r. R/ Dacia standing facing, holding standards inscribed V and XIII; eagle to l., lion to r., AN III (date) in exergue. RPC VIII online - (unassigned; ID 2494); Varbanov 11.

This was the throw-in in the broken Nero order.   This one is seemingly undamaged, although I'd rather this have been the destroyed one, if I had to sacrifice one.

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2 hours ago, Nerosmyfavorite68 said:

PhilipI(244-249)-AEprovincialSestertius-Dacia-28mm_14_79g.1hRxANIIIVarbanov11olivepatina.jpg.02df11a7faeb7762f9f144fad14b6539.jpg

Philip I (244-249). Dacia. Æ (28mm, 14.79g, 1h). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust r. R/ Dacia standing facing, holding standards inscribed V and XIII; eagle to l., lion to r., AN III (date) in exergue. RPC VIII online - (unassigned; ID 2494); Varbanov 11.

This was the throw-in in the broken Nero order.   This one is seemingly undamaged, although I'd rather this have been the destroyed one, if I had to sacrifice one.

That's a chunky boi. Do you think that somehow it could've contributed to the bending of the Nero? Just thinking out loud. 

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Last coin of 2023 just arrived.

Anastasius 1 - SB 19 - Constantinople. The bold star on the shoulder, E officina and 8 point star on the right of the reverse make this more specifically a DOC 25K example. Overall a nicely worn but bold and pleasing example.

I’m guessing the patina may have been stripped a very long time ago, but I’m not positive on that.IMG_5756.jpeg.1fb95c535d80bdf19a1ab47a1b96cbde.jpegIMG_5757.jpeg.f7ef8ae15ae3e5afe200c35986d4f452.jpeg

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I will kick 2024 off with my first coin of 2024!!
Technically, I bought it in 2023 (December 28th to be exact) but it arrived today so I am counting it for 2024.
Only $8.50! I love how good the antelope looks.

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Gallienus, Sole Reign
260-268 AD
AE antoninianus
Rome mint
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right
Reverse: DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope walking left
Mintmark: Gamma

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