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One of my new years resolutions has been filled faster then expected.. it was in my budget and I couldn't resist..

JULIUS CAESAR AR silver denarius. North Africa, 47-46 BC. No legend, diademed head of Venus right. Reverse - Aeneas carrying Palladium, and his father Anchises on his shoulder. RCV 1402. 17mm, 3.5g.

4TaSoYL36DzzFsJ5t8SKQZe72qHJjK.jpg.eac7f578284fba85ce0f4c531e6e7d06.jpg

Edited by AETHER
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Elagabalus, Billon Tetradrachm of Alexandria, Egypt. Dated year 4, AD 220-221. 23mm, 11.63gr. A KAICAΡ MA AYΡ ANTωNINOC EYCEB, laureate head right. / L-B, draped bust of Serapis right, wearing modius decorated with a poppy. Milne 2811-2812; Köln 2334; Dattari 4139; Emmett 2952.4. Geissen 2313, RPC 10032.

4939915_1702545270-removebg-preview.png.41d4922b295f34ce67953851b892e931.png

Edited by expat
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First purchases of the year!

Honestly I have no idea why I bought this germanic imitation 😂. But it looked very cute. 

The other one that caught my eye was this imperatorial issue by Fulvia (Wife of Mark Antony) and the peculiar amounts of counter marks on that coin. Havn't seen that many before on a quinarius. 

 

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coin2.webp

coin1.webp

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50 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Ah YOU got the Fulvia 🙂 … I set a Pre-Bid, but forgot the live auction. Gratulation. 

Haha sorry but thanks. Needed another coin to justify the shipping costs from Artemide. Won at my max sadly :P. 

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I had a Vespasian and Titus dupondius, so I figured I'd complete a set of the same denomination... I'm really liking dupondius coins as of late..

 

DOMITIAN AE dupondius. Rome, 92-93 AD. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIIII CENS PER P P, radiate head right. Reverse - FORTVNAE AVGVSTI, Fortuna standing left with rudder and cornucopia. RIC 417. 28mm, 11.6g

4yDFQB5b7jJ8D7ey9MMiBr83g6Ln2x.jpg.740f3daf6f7885b9532e3b12645566e6.jpg

 

 

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1 hour ago, Victrix said:

Haha sorry but thanks. Needed another coin to justify the shipping costs from Artemide. Won at my max sadly :P. 

😂😂😂

Thats funny - same here. I got the Nero Sestertius and search for another nice coin for shipping costs - and see that Fulvia, but…

So I have now only the Nero… 

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Posted (edited)

I don't dabble in minor coins as a rule, but this charming and scarce Athenian bronze, listed on eBay, became an exception.  The strike is pleasant, but there is a flan flaw on the obverse - not too intrusive.

Attica, Athens, AE 14, 130-90 BC.

 HGC 4, 1734; Kroll 1993, no. 100.

4.19 grams

Obverse: Cicada.

Reverse: Owl standing on thunderbolt, A and θ of city's ethnic to the left.

Struck on a narrow thick flan.

D-CameraAthensAE14130-90BCHGC41734Kroll1993no.100cicada-owlonthunderbolt4.19grams1-6-24.jpg.93efcb3afa878208c71920fe485c2004.jpg

Edited by robinjojo
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Posted · Supporter
9 minutes ago, robinjojo said:

I don't dabble in minor coins as a rule, but this charming and scarce Athenian bronze, listed on eBay, became an exception.  The strike is pleasant, but there is a flan flaw on the obverse - not too intrusive.

Attica, Athens, AE 14, 130-90 BC.

 HGC 4, 1734; Kroll 1993, no. 100.

4.19 grams

Obverse: Cicada.

Reverse: Owl standing on thunderbolt, A and θ of city's ethnic to the left.

Struck on a narrow thick flan.

D-CameraAthensAE14130-90BCHGC41734Kroll1993no.100cicada-owlonthunderbolt4.19grams1-6-24.jpg.93efcb3afa878208c71920fe485c2004.jpg

Love that cicada!

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My first 2 real purchases of 2024:
 

GetaAE15198-209ADAntiochPisidiaNike.png.4ede96d5047b766732be604bbd422b48.png

Geta as Caesar
198-209 AD
AE15
Antioch, Pisidia
Obverse: P SЄ [Γ]ЄTAS C, Bare-headed and draped bust right
Reverse: COL[…]S ЄNЄ, Nike advancing left, holding wreath and palm branch

PisidiaTermessosMajorPseudo-autonomousAE30200-300ADTychecrownedbyNike.png.93157d34795c01c8e1d5342d61e3eca1.png

Termessos Major, Pisidia
Pseudo-autonomous
Circa 200-300 AD
AE30
Obverse: TEPMHCCEΩN, laureate head of Zeus right
Reverse: ΤΩΝ ΜΕΙΖΟΝΩΝ, Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia, being crowned by Nike

 

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8 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Athalaric, Solidus, Victory

Lovely coin!

My latests ancient coin is much more humble. I picked this one up for little money because I like the artistic reverse:

RomVespasianDenarSecuritas.png.c75605958bd7762911d9382f527202cd.png

Vespasian, Roman Empire, AR denarius, 75 AD, Rome mint. Obv: [IMP] CAESAR VESPASIANVS [AVG]; head of Vespasian, laureate, r. Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Securitas, naked to waist, seated l., feet on stool, resting head on raised arm. 18mm, 3.22g. Ref: RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Vespasian 774.

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Happy New year! My first coin of 2024 is an antoninianus of Gallienus.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG: Radiate bust right, with drapery over shoulders
Rev: VICTORIA AET: Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm branch
S/P//-
Rome, 9th emission 
MIR 708A var ,RIC 586 var (Siscia) 
 

 

Screenshot_20240106-132100.png.0bfa095487b0b03f61580b68c1e348b7.png

This bust/reverse pairing was unknown to Göbl. Wolkow identifies one example he lists as unique in his booklet GALLIEN – L’ÉMISSION DITE « DES FIGURES ASSISES » ET LES ÉMISSIONS S/P-P/II. This was from CNG XXXI, lot 1122 and pictured below. They appear to be die matches. 

Screenshot_20240106-134305.png.0ca3833e7766f4fe899ad16720406cd4.png

Edited by Molag Bal
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Thanks again to @Roman Collector for the help with the determination - access for the weekend. Apparently I happened to get a slightly rarer type. At acsearch I only found 4 Sesterces, 2 As and 1 Dupondius for this Aeternitas type.

 

Diva Faustina I the Elder under Antoninus Pius; Reign: Antoninus Pius; Mint: Rome; Date: 141 AD; Nominal: As; Material: AE Bronze; Diameter: 27mm; Weight: 11.16g; Reference: BMC 1548; Reference: Cohen 31; Reference: RIC III Antoninus Pius 1158; Obverse: Bust of Faustina I, draped, right, hair elaborately waved and coiled in bands across head and drawn up at back and piled in a round coil on top; Inscription: DIVA FAVSTINA; Translation: Diva Faustina; Translation: The divine Faustina [the Elder]; Reverse: Aeternitas standing left, holding globe and raising above head a starry mantle; Inscription: AETERNITAS S C; Translation: Aeternitas, Senatus Consultum; Translation: Eternity. Decree of the senate.
 
faustina.png.56b1cc39eea8cc99a58d741fa8f4c23f.png
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Posted (edited)

Here's a very high grade, lustrous imitation (I believe) owl. that arrived late last week.  There also seems to be a small countermark on the obverse, the nature of which I am still trying to figure out.  The coin does have a couple of die breaks on the reverse.

Athens, eastern imitation owl, late 5th-mid 4th century BC.

17.2 grams

D-CameraAthenseastimitationowllate5th-mid4thcenpossibleCMBC17.2g1-7-24.jpg.18773b3eccc440727f7c5fbac3b8bad6.jpg

 

Here's a closeup of the possible countermark:

D-CameraAthenseastimitationowldetaillate5th-mid4thcenpossibleCMBC17.2g1-7-24.jpg.1d6d2f09b28cc594995ab1a10f01d018.jpg

There appears to be flow lines that would suggest that this is a countermark.  On the other hand it is very small, quite discrete, compared to what I have seen with other countermarks.

Also, for those interested in the Buttrey/Flament  Egyptian owl types, here are some examples from the 1989 Syrian Hoard:

Buttrey-FlamentStyleEgyptianimitativeowlsfrom1989SyriaHoard1-6-24.jpg.d6fa66a1dcd5ba90e55cbdea8aa9d1dc.jpg

 

Edited by robinjojo
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I just won this denarius of Severus Alexander.

image.jpeg.99bfb29c24401820a72da16e2d92a455.jpeg

SEVERUS ALEXANDER (222-235). Denarius. Rome, AD 231-235.
Obv: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG. Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev: IOVIS PROPVGNATOR. Jupiter standing right, hurling thunderbolt.
RIC 240.

Despite the abundance of well-preserved coins from his era, finding a denarius that truly resonated with me took a few months. I've finally discovered one that appeals to me both aesthetically and historically.
The depiction of Jupiter on the reverse particularly intrigues me, as it strikingly contrasts with his predecessor Elagabal's preference. According to Cassius Dio, Elagabal prioritized the Syrian sun god over Jupiter. Given that I primarily collect one silver coin per emperor, I like this one as a representative specimen for Severus Alexander.

Edited by Salomons Cat
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These Syrian 'uncertain' tetradrachms for Elagabal are very interesting. They are not 'imitations' but rather the low tail end of the minting of this denomination, before Gordian III reestablished it some 20 years later:

4924386_1701792700.jpg.4b568e346eee08bc5ef0a443821253b1.jpg
AR25mm 11.40g billon tetradrachm, Antioch, Emesa or pseudo-Laodicea(?) ca. 219

 

4924388_1701792702.jpg.1f46ecee688659f0c93b4449f8bbd1f0.jpg
AR26x23mm 16g billon tetradrachm, Antioch, Emesa or pseudo-Laodicea(?) ca. 219
 

They come from a series of widespread Syrian tetradrachms minted for Elagabal starting with 219 at an uncertain mint, either Antioch or Laodicea or Emesa. The series is struck in debased billon.

'"The tetradrachms with mint marks from numerous cities issued under Caracalla and Macrinus disappear under Elagabalus, and are replaced by a very common and relatively uniform issue with an eagle with a star between its legs, dated by Elagabalus' second consulship (A.D. 219). This has been interpreted by most authors to indicate that the multiple wartime tetradrachm mints were consolidated at Antioch....However, it is by no means certain that Antioch was the site of this consolidated tetradrachm mint. There are at least three candidates for the mint (Antioch, Emesa and Laodicea), with arguments for and against each."' (McAlee, Coins of Roman Antioch, p. 285)

The two specs here are possibly part of a deposit and were offered by the auction house together with other similar specimens, with similar patina and flan shape. They are likely the product of the same minting operation.

The earthen fill is also legit, it passed the acetone test.

Edited by seth77
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Posted (edited)

Here's a South Arabia hemidrachm, the first of this denomination I've owned.  For such as small coin, the centering and detail on both sides are very nice!  I'm using the seller's images - much better than my dark obscure ones!

South Arabia, Qataban Kingdom, AR hemidrachm, circa 350-300 BC.  Royal monogram on reverse, as usual for this denomination.

2.54 grams

D-CameraQatabanhemidrachmc.350-300BCroyalmonog2.54g1-8-24.jpg.05ae57402ee577fadce6c5879591c4b7.jpg

Edited by robinjojo
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This will be the first Ancient I receive in 2024 and it is in transit now.

image.png.9af2b06d376e1cbde231b93facac2a9a.png


Mark Antony, 44-30 BC. Denarius (Silver, 18 mm, 3.55 g, 12 h), military mint moving with Mark Antony (Patrae?), 32-31. ANT#AVG / III#VIR#R#P#C Galley right, with scepter tied with fillet on prow. Rev. LEGXVIII LYBICAE Aquila between two signa. Babelon (Antonia) 130. Crawford 544/11. CRI 375. RBW 1836. Sydenham 1240. Rough and with some scratches, otherwise, good fine. Ex Leu.

I have been the underbidder on a couple of Lybicae in the past couple of years  so I was very pleased to be successful with this one. Not as nice as the ones I missed but nicely fills my Lybicae gap.

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(A new) Galba incomming...! I love these character faces 😍

 

Lucius Livius Ocella Servius Sulpicius Galba (born 24 December 3 BC near Tarracina; died 15 January 69 AD in Rome) was Roman Emperor from 8 June 68 AD to 15 January 69 AD. In the year of his death, three more emperors were appointed, which is why it has gone down in history as the Four Emperors' Year. Galba was the first emperor who did not come from the Julio-Claudian imperial house. Already after the assassination of Caligula by the Praetorians on 24 January 41 AD, Galba is said to have been urged for the first time by his friends to reach for power, but he refused. In the winter of 67/68 AD, under the initiative of Gaius Iulius Vindex, governor of the unarmed province of Gallia Lugdunensis, an insurrectionary movement began against Nero. Galba initially remained neutral in response to the latter's request for support, neither joining nor sending news of the rebellion to Rome, as other commanders did. This seems to have been because Galba did not trust the letters. It was not until the beginning of April 68 AD that Galba joined the rebellion and was proclaimed emperor on 3 April in Carthago Nova by soldiers and provincials. However, he initially called himself legatus Senatus Populique Romani, as the final decision on Nero's successor was to be left to the Senate. Galba also sent letters to the other provincial governors asking for their support. These requests were met by Aulus Caecina Alienus, the quaestor of Baetica, and Marcus Salvius Otho, the governor of Lusitania, who joined him. It was precisely Otho's financial support that Galba needed to pay his troops. News of his confirmation as emperor probably reached Galba on 16 or 18 June, when his freedman Icelus arrived in Clunia. This was followed two days later by a message containing the exact text of the Senate's decision, delivered by the senator Titus Vinius. Galba now assumed the name Servius Galba Imperator Caesar Augustus and the tribunicia potestas.

Lucius Livius Ocella Servius Sulpicius Galba; Reign: Galba, Roman Imperial, Civil War; Mint: Antiochia ad Orontem, Syria; Date: c. 68 AD; Nominal: Tetradrachm; Material: Silver; Diameter: 25.5mm; Weight: 15.00g; Reference: Wruck 56; Reference: Prieur 95; Reference: McAlee 304; Reference: RPC I 4195; Obverse: Laureate head of Galba, right; to right, star; Inscription: ΓΑΛΒΑϹ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΩΡ ϹΕΒΑϹΤΟϹ ΚΑΙϹΑΡ; Translation: Galbas Autokrator Sebastos Kaisaras; Translation: Galba Imperator Augustus Caesar; Reverse: Eagle on thunderbolt, left; to left, palm branch; Inscription: ΕΤΟΥϹ ΝΕΟΥ ΙΕΡΟΥ Α; Translation: Etous neou ierou Alpha; Translation: First new sacred year.
 
GALBRPC4195.png.aff1435ebf68652ccecb1b195273da9a.png
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