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Another depressed-looking captive Dacian to add to my small collection. The auction house described the portrait of Trajan as "stern," which I think is apt. As is often the case, the coin looks much better in hand, and not so hopelessly scratched, as if somebody tried to clean it with a wire brush!

2ndversionNumisBids_NomosAGobolos3012_17.23Lot646TrajanDenariusDaciancaptivew.trophyRIC222jpg.jpg.334c1e57e3b851bc3655a86aeb981dc6.jpg

Trajan AR Denarius, AD 104 (Sear RCV II) or 106 [Foss], Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TRP COS V P P / Rev. Captive Dacian wearing peaked cap with wide brim and shirt with long sleeves, ending in breeches, seated right on ground in attitude of mourning at foot of trophy (consisting of cuirass and shields); his left elbow rests on his raised left knee and his face is propped on his left hand, with his right hand across his chest; SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI. 19 mm., 3.41 g., 7 h. RIC II Trajan 222 (p. 259); BMCRE III Trajan 187 (p. 58); RSC II Trajan 537a; Sear RCV II 3169 (ill. p. 105) (obv. bust var.); Foss, Trajan 28d (p. 101) [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)]. Purchased from Nomos AG, Zürich, Switzerland, at Nomos Obolos Auction 30, 17 Dec. 2023, Lot 646. 

The rest of my little crew of captives:

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And one column to rule them all.

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Edited by DonnaML
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Latest sarc wins. maybe it's sarc's camera setup that keeps prices low but i'm pretty happy with the hammers on these. Been searching for a euthydemos ii type for a while too. It's neat to see the slight change in the herakles reverse on these two coins.

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Demetrios Aniketos, Bopearachchi 1F

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Euthydemos II, Bopearachchi 1A

Edited by Cordoba
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  • Benefactor

This a fairly common denarius of Septimius Severus, purchase from my local coin shop a week or so ago.  It commemorates the peace of 199 AD between Rome and the Parthian Empire, according to Van Meter.

Septimius Severus, denarius Rome, 202-210 AD.

Cohen 744; Van Meter 167

3.40 grams

Obverse    SEVERVS PIVS AVG - Laureate head right.

VICT PART MAX - Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.

D-CameraSeptimiusSeverusdenariusRome202-210ADCohen744VanMeter1673.40gSal1-20241-18-24.jpg.0d35f146d9587422624964bad79f2898.jpg

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I have a golden week / weekend … 😉 

 

1. A lovely Tremissis with a lovely Honorius portrait.

Honorius. AD 393-423. AV Tremissis (16mm, 1.50 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Struck circa AD 403-408. D N HONORI VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing forwards, head left, holding wreath in right hand and globus cruciger in left; star to right; CONOB. RIC X 35; Depeyrot 58/2. Toned and lustrous, minor scrapes, minor edge mark. Near EF. An attractive example.

IMG_0026.jpeg.0441a4f7e8e2b55491f453041ba9e585.jpeg

 
2. A uncertain Zeno Solidus from Western Europe (?).

Pseudo-Imperial, uncertain AV Solidus. In the name of Zeno. Uncertain mint, AD 476-489. D N ZENO PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly to right, holding spear and shield decorated with horseman motif / VICTORIA AVGGG Δ, Victory standing facing, head to left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. For prototype, cf. RIC X 911 and 930, Depeyrot 108/1; Roma E-110, 1656 (same dies). 4.34g, 20mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

IMG_0027.jpeg.f63352c3d5885de52a04730c6f818063.jpeg

 
3. A Zeno with a legend error at the reverse with „I“ before VICTORIA.

Zeno. Second reign, AD 476-491. AV Solidus (19.5mm, 4.39 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 4th officina. Pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield / Victory standing left, holding long cross; star to right; Δ//CONOB. RIC X 911 and 930; Depeyrot 108/1. Lightly toned, minor doubling, lightly clippped. EF.

IMG_0028.jpeg.613d0b805ef091c0aaa92138aba0e247.jpeg

 

4. A Odovacar Solidus wit a retrograde „Z“ at the obverse legend.

Pseudo-Imperial, Odovacar (Odoacer) AV Solidus. In the name of Zeno. Rome, AD 476-489. D N ZENO PERP F AVG (Z retrograde), pearl-diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly to right, holding spear and shield decorated with horseman motif / VICTORIA AVGGG Γ•, Victory standing facing, head to left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, •COMOB• in exergue. RIC X 3656; Depeyrot 90/1; Lacam pls. 50-1, 10-24. 4.38g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely rare with partially retrograde obv. legend.

IMG_0029.jpeg.ab4113c6fa1a9cca59335e2a3a8fe9c8.jpeg

 

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  • Benefactor

The last of my NYINC purchases. The surface is indeed "somewhat rough" (to put it mildly!) but the coin is unusually silvery for a Roman Alexandrian tetradrachm -- Nero is just about the last emperor for whom one ever sees that -- and it looks quite nice in hand.

Nero, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 10 (AD 63/64), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Radiate head right, ΝΕΡΩ ΚΛΑV ΚΑΙΣ ΣΕΒ ΓΕΡ / Rev. Draped bust of Sarapis right, crowned with modius (kalathos) adorned with laurel leaves, wearing taenia (fillet) and himation, ΑVΤΟ-ΚΡΑ around, LI [Year 10] in right field. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. I 5274 (1992)]; RPC Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/1/5274; Emmett 133.10 [Emmett, Keith, Alexandrian Coins (Lodi, WI, 2001)]; Dattari (1901 ed.) 251-252 p. 15 [Dattari, Giovanni, Monete imperiali greche, Numi Augg. Alexandrini, Catalogo della collezione (Cairo 1901)]; Milne 223 p. 7 (ill. as RPC I 5274 Specimen 2) [Milne, J.G., Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins (Oxford 1933, reprint with supplement by Colin M. Kraay, 1971)]; K&G 14.77 (ill. p. 59) [Kampmann, Ursula & Ganschow, Thomas, Die Münzen der römischen Münzstätte Alexandria  (2008)]; BMC 16 Alexandria 124 p. 19 (ill. as RPC I 5274 Specimen 3) [Poole, Reginald Stuart, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 16, Alexandria (London 1892)]; SNG France 4, Alexandrie I 333-353 (all same type) (ill. Planches 25-26) [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France Vol. 4, Alexandrie I, Auguste-Trajan (Zurich 1998)]; Curtis 159-168 (all same type) p. 5 [James W. Curtis, The Tetradrachms of Roman Egypt (1969)]; Köln 160-161 [Geissen, A., Katalog alexandrinischer Kaisermünzen, Köln, Band I (Augustus-Trajan) (Cologne, 1974); Förschner 114 (ill. p. 53) [Förschner, Gisela, Die Münzen der Römischen Kaiser in Alexandrien, Historisches Museum Frankfurt (1987)]. 26 mm., 12.52 g., 12 h. Purchased Jan. 12, 2024 from Keith Candiotti (Miami, FL) at NYINC 2024; ex Leu Numismatik AG, Winterthur, Switzerland, Web Auction 16, 22-24 May 2021, Lot 1993, described as “somewhat rough, otherwise, very fine,” from “Rhakotis Collection, formed in the 1960s and 1970s,” with old German-language coin envelope.*

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RomanAlexandriaNero-SarapisTetradrachmYr10CoinTicketRhakotisColl.jpeg.b7b1dbf90b92ad6f0e677f3d18f176b8.jpeg

*The coin envelope must date to sometime no earlier than 1974, because among the catalog references it cites is Köln (Geissen) Band I, which was published in 1974. 

If anyone has any further information about the so-called "Rhakotis Collection" (presumably a typical made-up auction house name), or has ever seen a coin envelope like this one before, please let me know.

Edited by DonnaML
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2 hours ago, DonnaML said:

If anyone has any further information about the so-called "Rhakotis Collection" (presumably a typical made-up auction house name), or has ever seen a coin envelope like this one before, please let me know.

I can't recall if that's the same tag that came with mine (it's at the safety deposit box now), but I think it looked like that.

I've tried my usual strategies, mainly trying to get a picture of where the coins came from before entering the collection (or where published while in it). The odd thing: I haven't found a single Rhakotis Coll. coin traceable to any prior catalog or publication. (If someone knows any, please let me know!) Despite many very fine & rare coins that should've appeared somewhere. (E.g., No Dattari coins at all, as far as I can tell, even though they first hit the market precisely then, 1960s-1970s.)

To me, that suggests it may be the collection of someone working in Egypt and buying directly from local finds/dealers. (Maybe the name is a clue that they worked in the construction industry?)

Leu's PDF is available online, everything else seems based on it. >4 pp. but very little background: 
https://leunumismatik.com/source/images/auction/26/pdf/90173def-0a9b-4f6b-ab0d-da2e1cc7feb3.pdf

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I don't know what you call it in America, in Germany we call something like this "idiot's luck". And I can boast that I always have such "idiot luck" - I buy coins and often don't even notice that there is something "special" about the coin. Sometimes more special, sometimes less.

Today I accidentally bought a Geta at auction because I just thought the portrait was beautiful and because I like the coins from Laodicea. Then I saw in the description (only after purchasing) that there was a legend error. Instead of GETA just a GEA. The Syrian engraver simply left a T there.

 

Publius Septimius Geta; Reign: Septimius Severus
Mint: Laodiceia ad Mare, Syria; Date: 202 AD
Nominal: Denarius; Material: Silver; Diameter: 19.5mm; Weight: 3.48g
Reference: BMC 751; Reference: Cohen 83; Reference: RIC IV Geta 98

Obverse: Bust of Geta, bare-headed, draped, right
Inscription: P SEPT GEA(sic!) CAES PONT (insteat of P SEPT GETA CAES PONT)
Translation: Publius Septimius Geta, Caesar, Pontifex [Maximus]
Translation: Publius Septimius Geta, Caesar, [high] priest

Reverse: Minerva, helmeted, draped, standing left, leaning on shield, holding spear in right hand
Inscription: MINERV SANCT
Translation: Minerva Sanctae
Translation: Minerva, the sacred

GETARIC982.png.e1937408975adea85f268a18e9122895.png

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Here's my first coin received in 2024.  Although I actually acquired it in Leu Web Auction 28 in December, it just arrived last week.

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Domitian, AD 81-96.
AR Denarius, 3.5 g, 18.2 mm, 12 h.
Rome mint, AD 88.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, right.
Rev: COS XIIII; Legend and column inscribed LVD SAEC FEC within laurel wreath.
Ref: Sear RCV 2725, RIC II, Pt. 1 (2nd ed.) 604.
Acquired from Leu Numismatik, Web Auction 28, Lot No. 3424, 11 December 2023.
This type commemorates the secular Games, celebrated in Rome by Domitian in October of AD 88.

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I had a bit of buyer's remorse after I won this coin but then it arrived and all of that remorse went right out the window. 
Obviously, I bought it for the Victory reverse but the portrait of Verus really was the icing on the cake. It is worn but still looks great IMO. 

LuciusVerusAESestertius168ADTRPOTVIIIIMPVCOSIIIS-CVictory.png.8c35f76e8072c81b3f80d4fc6fb795bc.png

Lucius Verus
168 AD
Sestertius, 32mm/29.65g
Obverse: L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right
Reverse: TR POT VIII IMP V COS III S-C, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm

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8 minutes ago, Furryfrog02 said:

I had a bit of buyer's remorse after I won this coin but then it arrived and all of that remorse went right out the window. 
Obviously, I bought it for the Victory reverse but the portrait of Verus really was the icing on the cake. It is worn but still looks great IMO. 

LuciusVerusAESestertius168ADTRPOTVIIIIMPVCOSIIIS-CVictory.png.8c35f76e8072c81b3f80d4fc6fb795bc.png

Lucius Verus
168 AD
Sestertius, 32mm/29.65g
Obverse: L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right
Reverse: TR POT VIII IMP V COS III S-C, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm

Very nice! A good example of how grade isn't everything. That coin has a lot of eye appeal despite the wear.

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1 hour ago, CPK said:

Very nice! A good example of how grade isn't everything. That coin has a lot of eye appeal despite the wear.

I wish the Victory reverse was better...but then again, if it was, it would probably have sold for way more than I could afford. 
The portrait reminds me a bit of @lordmarcovan's "CIRCAM" designation.  In hand, it is a bit lighter than the field around it which gives it that cameo look. 
Either way, it is a beautiful coin and I am super excited to have it in the FF collection now 🙂

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My latest ancients! A long time coming from December's Leu auction. Four that are striking similar! I just love the sharpness/relief/style of these dies.

SELEUKID KINGS OF SYRIA. Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC. Tetradrachm, Seleukeia on the Tigris, circa 300-296/5. Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress. Rev. BAΣIΛ[EΩΣ] - ΣEΛEYKOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; to left, NO. SC 117.6a.

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  • Benefactor

Here's a fairly recent purchase, part of my ongoing bottom feeder efforts.  I guess much of my DNA is descended from a cat fish somewhere along the way.

This coin, not sold at auction, due very likely to the corrosion, especially on the reverse, still has a nice portrait of Septimius Severus.  At  £38.10 I figured, "why not?".  

Here's the original lot description.  This coin was lot 985 in Roma E-Sale 114.

Septimius Severus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 196. L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, laureate and cuirassed bust to right / [P M] TR P IIII COS II P P, Victory advancing to left, holding wreath and palm; S-C across fields. RIC IV 725; C. 420; BMCRE 591. 17.63g, 31mm, 12h.

Very Fine.

Ex Don Ferrante Collection, Roma Numismatics Ltd., E-Sale 99, 7 July 2022, lot 995.

D-CameraSeptimiusSeverussestertiusRomeAD196RICIV725C.420ExDonFerranteColl17.63g1-23-24.jpg.e92d79a19dfb38272d0539086627ad9d.jpg

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It's very worn, the legends are mostly gone, but I really liked this Domitian from Caesarea Maritima:

4890275_1700841858.jpg.78546d0b8f06ab7fbc61a13cda813e0a.jpg

AE24 10.43g looks coppery and feels similar to an Imperial as, which is probably what it was meant to be. The reverse very likely is a reference to the First Jewish War, 10years later.

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35 minutes ago, robinjojo said:

Here's a fairly recent purchase, part of my ongoing bottom feeder efforts.  I guess much of my DNA is descended from a cat fish somewhere along the way.

This coin, not sold at auction, due very likely to the corrosion, especially on the reverse, still has a nice portrait of Septimius Severus.  At  £38.10 I figured, "why not?".  

For £38.10 I would've jumped on that!
If you are a bottom feeder, that must make me the small little bugs and parasite that live in the mud and muck haha.

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This one is pretty worn and not much of a looker but who could pass up a provincial coin of Antoninus Pius with Melikertes-Palaimon surfing on a dolphin on the reverse? All for the bottom-feeder price of $12.25!
AntoninusPiusAE20CorinthAchaeaMelikertes-PalaimononDolphin.png.741cbf1d39a0f370a80f17240c77a37b.png

Antoninus Pius
AE20, 7.25g
Corinth, Achaea
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, laureate head of Antoninus Pius, right
Reverse: C L I COR, Melikertes-Palaimon standing, right, on dolphin, right, raising arm

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This coin just arrived in the mail from Leu WA 28/29 in December. I'd already commented on its (modern) "object biography" in the provenance thread and may post about my "end-of-the-Julio-Claudians set" later.

For now, just commenting that I'm thrilled by how good the coin looks in hand. One downside of big digital photos is that minor flaws may look major. (Of course, digital photos have many advantages over life-size print photos, and I'd always prefer to see both.)

image.jpeg.a74852635583c68cbf5ade62207d5f5d.jpeg

In the past two auction photos it looked pretty scratched up. CNG's photo from Triton XXIV (Merani, Jan 2021) :

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Even more so in the Leu WA 28, 2426 photo.

From the Triton print catalog & CNG's video, though, I suspected it'd look better in hand.

Indeed, it does (to my eyes). I can't see the scratches at all without magnification (I have good vision & collect tiny  Greek fractions), and only barely with a normal magnifier.

Edited by Curtis JJ
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My first coin with a Janus design, and I picked it up in January. 🙂 

24-10JanusDenarius.jpg.be64ab015ec54e92a1c136a405a0b2d2.jpgM. Furius L.f. Philus. 120 BC. AR Denarius (19.5mm, 3.93 g, 12h). Rome mint.
Obv: Laureate head of bearded Janus
Rev: Roma standing left, holding wreath and scepter; to left, trophy of Gallic arms flanked by a carnyx and shield on each side; star above.
Crawford281/1; Sydenham 529; Furia 18; RBW 1105. Toned with iridescence. 
CNG Triton. January 2024.
From the Kalevala Collection. Ex Roma E-Sale 60 (1 August 2019), lot 620.

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Bought some very bottom of the barrel ancients in a lot today. There's something I like about them being so worn,these surely circulated well over a century. One is is a trajan drachm and one of the antony denarii is of Legio Lybicae. 

Fun for 28 euro 😄

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Edited by Victrix
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After @expat's thread on Valerian I the other day, I went looking for a VICT PART like @Curtis JJ shared. I didn't have any luck in that aspect but I did find a Valerian with a beautiful depiction of Victory that I didn't have. Better yet, it was from a seller who lives only a few miles from me.  I threw a bid and won.

The green on Victory's chest is a little darker in person than it was in the pictures. Overall I am happy with it. Do you think a soak in distilled water would help? Or should I leave it as is?

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Valerian I
253-260 AD
Antioch
Billon Antoninianus
Obverse: IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, radiate, draped bust right 
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGG, Victory standing right, looking left, holding wreath and palm branch.
Goebl 1574; (reverse type not in RIC).

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