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Severus Alexander

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Silver stavraton, cf. DOC V 1277 (also no sigla) & 1295 - 7 (similar rev.); Bendall LPC p. 154, 2; Lianta 900, Bendall PCPC 327, SBCV 2510, aVF, toned, die wear, obverse die crack (line below chin), flan cracks, legend not fully struck, 7.911g, 26.9mm, 180o, Constantinopolis (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, phase VI, 1379 - 16 Feb 1391 A.D.; obverse bust of Christ facing, bearded, nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) flanking over Christ's shoulders, eight stars alternating with eight pellets in outer circle, no sigla; reverse + IW ΔECΠOTHC KAI AVTOKPATOP AVG / + ΘVXAPITH BACIIΛ TWN PWMEWN (or similar, blundered, partly unstruck/off flan)), facing bust of John V, bearded, nimbate, wearing domed crown with pendilia, and maniakon, no sigla; from the Robert Wachter Collection; very rare

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On the death of John V, his grandson John VII Palaiologos, rebelled against his uncle Manuel II, who he felt had stolen his claim to the empire. In April 1390 he seized Constantinople with Genoese and Turkish aid and reigned briefly until his deposition in September. After reconciling with Manuel, John served as his regent from 1399 to 1403 while the Basileus traveled to the courts in the West, seeking Latin aid against the Turks, who were besieging Constantinople.

The capital was saved by Bayezid's defeat at Ankara in 1402; in 1403 John signed a treaty with the Turks whereby Thessalonike was restored to the empire. Shortly after Manuel's return from the West, John was made “basileus of all Thessaly” and despotes of Thessalonike, where he spent his final years quietly.

 

John VII, Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1399-1403. 3.77 gr. 21 mm. 12 hr. Sear 2562; DO  1334-45.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of John, legend in single circle.    

John VII, Eighth stavraton, Constantinople, 1399-1402. 0.48 gr. 14 mm. 6 hr. Sear 2562A; DO  1364-74.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: bust of John.

John VII, Follaro, Constantinople, 1390. 0.49 gr. 14.5 mm. 12 hr. Sear 2567 (John VIII); DO 1394-5.  Obv: Crowned bust of John; rev: cross with star in each angle.

John VII, Follaro, Constantinople, 1399-1403. 0.44 gr. 13.1 mm. 7 hr. Sear 2568 (John VIII) ; DO 1391-92.  Obv: Christ standing facing in mandorla; rev: emperor standing facing, holding scepter cruciger.

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Manuel II Palaiologos, emperor (1391–1425). Second son of John V, Manuel was named co-emperor and heir to the throne in 1373. He was forced, however, to endure internecine conflict within the imperial family for nearly two decades, only attaining sole rule in 1391, following the death of his older brother Andronikos IV.

Manuel's career was spent by alternately seeking accommodation with the Turks and searching Western military aid against them. As an Ottoman vassal he had to accompany sultan Bayezid I on campaign in Anatolia in 1391. From 1399 to 1403 Manuel visited the courts of western Europe, vainly seeking assistance against the Turks who were besieging Constantinople (1394–1402). In his absence, his nephew John VII ruled Constantinople as regent.  Manuel was an energetic ruler who went on campaigns, conducted diplomatic negotiations, and supervised the reconstruction of the Hexamilion at the Isthmus of Corinth (1408, 1415). He suffered a stroke in 1422 and died three years later as the monk Matthew.

Manuel was a scholar and left an impressive body of writings: correspondence, studies on theology and rhetoric, even a description of a tapestry in the Louvre (which it is my hope to someday read – after retirement! 😊)

 

Manuel II, Stavraton, Constantinople, 1394-1425. 7.41 gr. 25.8 mm. 12 hr. Sear 2549; DO – (sigla var.).  Obv:  Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of Manuel, legend in two circles.

Manuel II, Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1391-1395. 3.43 gr. 20.5 mm. 7 hr. Sear 2550; DO 1312.  Obv:  Nimbate St. Demetrios riding horse right; rev: nimbate bust of Manuel, holding in right hand a scepter cruciger, legend in single circle. Ex Despot Sale, LHS 97, May 10, 2006, lot 353. Ex collection Kapamadji.

Manuel II, Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1403-25. 3.77 gr.19  mm. 5 hr. Sear 2551; DO  1451.  Obv:  Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of Manuel, legend in single circle.

Manuel II, Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1391- 1423. 3.70 gr. 19.9 mm.6  hr. Sear 2551 var.; DO  1453-55.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of Manuel, legend in single circle. This is a scarce variety, with the reverse inscription reading BACIΛεVC MANOVHΛ…instead of the usual MANOVHΛ BACIΛεVC…

Manuel II, Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1403-25. 3.63 gr. 19.3 mm. 8 hr. Sear 2552; DO 1519-20.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of Manuel, legend in single circle.

Manuel II, Eighth stavraton, Constantinople, 1391- 1423. 0.59 gr. 13 mm. 6 hr. Sear 2553; DO 1543-88.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ rev: bust of Manuel.

Manuel II, Follaro, Constantinople, 1391- 1423. 0.40 gr. 13.8 mm. 12 hr. Sear 2559; DO  1610.  Obv:  Bust of Manuel; rev: cross with star in each angle.

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John VII, struck 1399-1402 as regent for Manuel II. SB2562silverJohnVIIhalfstav7750.jpg.654260a373c34a3b09387aca5194906d.jpg

20 mm. 3.76 grams. Sear 2562
half stavraton
Christ/John

SB2564silverJohnVIIIstavraton9250.jpg.e7da7c1d1fd041cba7a9303f89172d86.jpg

John VIII, 24-22 mm. 6.78 grams. stravraton = 1/2 hyperpyron. Sear 2564.
Christ/emperor
The name of John is obliterated, but on well-struck pieces (which are rare) his name would show at 1:00-2:00.

The artwork is poor, but in hand it is obvious it is a good piece of silver, and I think that was all they cared about when the empire was collapsing. 

 

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John VIII Palaiologos, Byzantine Empire
AR stavraton
Obv: IC-XC, Facing bust of Christ, surrounded by eight dots
Rev: IWANHC DECPOTIC O PALEOLOGOC QV XAPITI AVTOKPATOP in two lines around nimbate facing bust of the emperor, dot to left and right
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1425-1448
Ref: SB 2563
Size: 6.66 gr.

[IMG]

John VIII Palaiologos, Byzantine Empire
AR half-stavraton
Obv: IC-XC, Facing bust of Christ
Rev: IWANHC DECPOTIC Q PALEOLOGOC, nimbate facing bust of the emperor
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1425-1448
Ref: SB 2565
Size: 3.3 gr.

[IMG]

2 hours ago, ela126 said:

John VIII Starvaton - 6.71g

As Warren mentioned, strike is commonly poor. But a good chunk of silver. Almost identical in size to the Hexagrams 800 years earlier.

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Your stavraton looks like a die match to mine.

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We are approaching the bitter end of the Byzantine Empire. The Byzantine world continues its slow collapse, but the Byzantines still fight to survive. Manuel II was the Byzantine Emperor from 1391 AD to 1425 AD. The following maps are snapshots of the interesting Youtube video "The History of the Byzantine Empire : Every Month". The maps show the Byzantine Empire, near the end of the reign of John V in 1391 AD, and near the end of the reign of Manuel II in 1425 AD. We see that, according to the maps, during the reign of John V, the Byzantine Empire lost almost all of its territory in Greece, and the Byzantine Empire finally lost the city of Philadelphia deep within Asia Minor (see my Andronicus III post in this thread). We see that, according to the maps, during the reign of Manuel II, the Byzantine Empire regained some territory in Greece, and regained some territory on the western coast of the Black Sea.

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Here's my Manuel II silver half stavraton.

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Manuel II. AR Half Stavraton. Minted 1391 AD To 1425 AD. Constantinople Mint. Sear 2551. Grierson 1517. Maximum Diameter 20.2 mm. Weight 3.68 grams. Obverse : Jesus Christ Bust Facing Front, With Halo. Reverse : Manuel II Bust Facing Front, Wearing Crown With Pendilia, With Halo, "M-A-N-O-V-H-Lambda" Greek For "Manuel" Clockwise Starting At 12 O'Clock.

Edited by sand
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The description includes dealers hype8.jpg.cff6a46ae51e688983c995380a10b108.jpg

★ Exceptional For The Issue ★

John VIII Palaeologus. AR Half Stavraton (3.3 gr.), 1425-1448. Constantinople. Nimbate bust of Christ facing; sigla: unclear / Nimbate facing bust of John; sigla: • | •. Cf. DOC 1781; PCPC 349 (unclear sigla); LPC p. 172, 2; SB 2565.

Good Very Fine, Very exceptional for the issue. One of the very finest known examples of this very hard issue

And of course a full example 

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John VIII SBCV-2564 7.14gm 1425-1428 AD

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John VIII Palaiologos, emperor (1425–48), was the eldest son of Manuel II. He succeeded his father in mid-1425. John took active part in two successful campaigns in the Peloponnesos. During his reign the Byzantines regained much of the Morea and began to expand into Attica and Boeotia. Nonetheless, Thessalonike fell to the Turks in 1430 and, after the Turkish campaign of 1446, the Morea had to pay tribute to the sultan.

John sought rapprochement with the West  to ward off further Ottoman advances. To this end, he  was eager to achieve Union of the Churches and personally participated in the Council of Ferrara-Florence, where he signed the decree of Union. After his return to Constantinople in 1440, however, he found much bitter opposition to this move. John died without ever implementing the Union. He was succeeded by his brother, Constantine XI.

 

Stavraton, Constantinople, 1425-48. 6.65 gr. 24 mm. 12 hr. Sear 2563-4; DO 1647-48. Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of John, inscription in two lines around emperor.

Stavraton, Constantinople, 1425-48. 6.70 gr. 23.2 mm. hr. Sear 2563-4; DO 1748-50. Obv: Brockage, but would be nimbate bust of Christ]; rev: nimbate bust of John, inscription in two lines around emperor.

Stavraton, Constantinople, 1425-48. 6.67 gr. 24.2 mm. 6 hr.   Sear 2563-4; DO – ; Ashmolean 1064.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of John, inscription in two lines around emperor. The reverse is struck from a half stavraton die. P. J. Donald’s article: “A Late Palaeologan Irregularity”, published in the Spink Numismatic Circular, Nov. 1986, pp. 294-5 first described this error, of which I have tracked ca. 7 specimens, all from the same dies.

Stavraton, Constantinople, 1425-48. 6.76 gr. 23.8 mm. 1 hr.   Sear 2563-4; DO 1746; Ashmolean 1065. Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of John, inscription in two lines around emperor.

Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1425-48. 3.30 gr. 20.1  mm. 2 hr. Sear 2565; DO  1766.  Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of John, inscription in double border of dots. Ex collection Henri Pottier.

Half stavraton, Constantinople, 1425-48. 3.25 gr. 19 mm. 1 hr.   Sear -; DO 1757-58; PCPC 17-19. Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: nimbate bust of John, inscription in double border of dots. A scarce issue from the public mint, not the imperial mint of Constantinople. See Bendall PCPC p. 69.

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It's nice to see, that 7 persons, including myself in this post, have posted interesting John VIII coins in this thread : @Valentinian, @ela126, @ValiantKnight, @catadc, @Simon, @voulgaroktonou, and myself in this post. I wonder, if anyone else, will post any John VIII coins in this thread.

By 1448 AD, the Byzantine Empire had survived for 1000 years. The Byzantine Empire had experienced many crushing defeats, but had survived again and again. There were many times, when only the huge Theodosian walls, had saved Constantinople from being taken. However, the Byzantine Empire, the Eastern Roman Empire, was heading toward its final defeat.

John VIII was the Byzantine Emperor from 1425 AD to 1448 AD. The following map is a snapshot of the interesting Youtube video "The History of the Byzantine Empire : Every Month". The map shows the Byzantine Empire, near the end of the reign of John VIII in 1448 AD. Compared to the map at the end of the reign of Manuel II in 1425 AD (see my Manuel II post in this thread), the Byzantine Empire lost Thessalonica in 1430 AD to the Ottoman Empire, but gained territory on the Peloponnese peninsula, and gained the city of Athens and the area surrounding Athens. After the fall of Thessalonica in 1430 AD, the Byzantine Empire consisted of 3 territories : the northern territory containing Constantinople, some small islands, and the southern territory of the Peloponnese peninsula and Athens. The northern Byzantine territory was completely surrounded by the Ottoman Empire, but the northern Byzantines still had access to the sea.

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Here's my John VIII silver stavraton. It seems to me, that the portraits of Jesus and the Emperor, became increasingly crude, toward the end of the Byzantine Empire. Also, it seems to me, that my coin was minted using a worn die, for the Emperor side of the coin. To me, it looks like, there are signs of cracks and breaks, in the Emperor side die.

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John VIII. AR Stavraton. Minted 1425 AD To 1448 AD. Constantinople Mint. Sear 2563. LPC Page 172 Type 1. Maximum Diameter 23.0 mm. Weight 6.76 grams. Obverse : Jesus Christ Bust Facing Front, With Halo. Reverse : John VIII Bust Facing Front, Wearing Crown With Pendilia, With Halo, "IWAN" Greek For "John" In Outer Legend Clockwise Starting At 12 O'Clock.

Edited by sand
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Constantine XI Palaiologos, emperor (12 Mar. 1449–29 May 1453). Last member of the Palaiologan dynasty and final ruler of the Byzantine Empire, Constantine was the fourth son of Manuel II. Constantine came to the Morea in 1428 to share the despotate with his brothers Theodore II and Thomas Palaiologos, where he ruled for 20 years. He significantly strengthened the Byzantine territories there by the restoration of the Hexamilion (1444) and the conquest of Patras (1429), Athens, and Thebes (1444). His attempt to regain all of  Greece, however, was destroyed by the Ottoman campaign of 1446. Since both of his older brothers, Theodore and Andronikos, predeceased him, he inherited the throne upon the death of John VIII. He was crowned at Mistra on 6 Jan. 1449 and began his reign in March when he reached Constantinople. He did not receive a second coronation in Hagia Sophia.

Like his brother John VIII, Constantine accepted the Union of Florence (merging of the eastern and western churches), in the hope of gaining military assistance from the West. During his short reign he made several desperate appeals to European rulers. He did not implement the Union, however, until 12 Dec. 1452. Constantine fought bravely during the Ottoman siege of Constantinople and was killed on the ramparts during the final Turkish assault.

There have been numerous studies of the fall of Constantinople, but one of the most convenient for English readers is Sir Steven Runciman's The Fall of Constantinople 1453. The quoted sections that follow are from his wonderful book. On Monday the 28th, realizing the end was near, the emperor encouraged his small force by reminding them what they were fighting for. “To his Greek subjects he said that a man should always be ready to die either for his faith or his country or for his family or for his sovereign. Now his people must be prepared to die for all four causes. He spoke of the glories and high traditions of the great Imperial city… He urged them to remember that they were the descendants of the ancient heroes of Greece and Rome and to be worthy of their ancestors. For his part, he said, he was ready to die for his faith, his city, and his people.”

That evening the last Christian service was held in the great church of Holy Wisdom, the Hagia Sophia, that for a thousand years had been the heart of Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Latin Catholic and Greek Orthodox put aside their bitter doctrinal differences. “Priests who held union with Rome to be a mortal sin now came to the altar to serve their Unionist brothers. The Cardinal was there, and beside him bishops who would never acknowledge his authority; and all the people came to make confession and take communion, not caring whether Orthodox or Catholic administered it. There were Italians and Catalans along with the Greeks. The golden mosaics, studded with the images of Christ and his saints and the emperors and empresses of Byzantium, glimmered in the light of a thousand lamps and candles; and beneath them for the last time the priests in their splendid vestments moved in the solemn rhythm of the Liturgy. At this moment there was union in the Church of Constantinople.”

 

Have you ever seen an “autograph” of Constantine XI? Here’s one I took from a book in our library. It’s from a contemporary chrysobull, or imperial decree. The wording follows very closely the inscriptions found on his stavrata and those of his immediate predecessors.

+ Κωνσταντίνος εν Χριστώ τω Θεώ πιστός βασιλεύς και αυτοκράτωρ των Ρωμαίων ο Παλαιολόγος :+

Constantine, in Christ, God, faithful emperor and autocrat of the Romans, the Palaeologos.

ConstantineXIsignature.jpg.26af40e3da04fd4b24bbb75549ad1418.jpg

 

Constantine XI. Constantinople. 1449/53. Eighth Stavraton. 0.63 gr. 12.7 mm. hr. 11. Sear -; DO 1789. Bendall, “The coinage of Constantine XI” (Revue Numismatique 1991, pp. 134-142), #110 (this coin). Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: bust of Constantine.

Constantine XI. Constantinople. 1449/53. Eighth Stavraton. 0.63 gr. 13 mm. hr. 12. Sear -; DO 1789. Bendall, “The coinage of Constantine XI” (Revue Numismatique 1991, pp. 134-142), #129 (this coin). Obv: Nimbate bust of Christ; rev: bust of Constantine.

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Mehmed II, ruler of the Ottomans  (1451–81) and conqueror of Constantinople. Although his relations with Constantine XI were initially amicable, the Byzantine emperor unwisely provoked Mehmed by  threatening to support the claims of Orhan, a potential rival to the Ottoman throne, who was held at the Byzantine court. What was he thinking?  Soon thereafter Mehmed systematically prepared for his assault on Constantinople. Mehmed began the siege on 6 Apr. 1453. The mighty walls, which had withstood repeated sieges for a thousand years, were no match for the Turkish cannon and the City fell on 29 May 1453. Mehmed allowed his troops a day of plundering and then assumed full control. He immediately began “the greater war”—transforming the ravaged city into a vital new capital, a project that engaged him the rest of his life.

 

 

OTTOMAN EMPIRE: Mehmet II, 1451-1481, Au sultani, Constantinople, AH 883 = 1478/79. 3.52 gr. 20 mm.

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16 hours ago, sand said:

Thanks for posting your fascinating, and extremely rare, Constantine XI eighth stavratons. Also, thanks for posting some interesting history of Constantine XI. I enjoyed reading it. Your Byzantine collection has many interesting coins.

Dear @sand, thank you for your kind words. This has been a fun exercise; so many (yourself included) have posted so many interesting coins and fascinating information. I'm going on a few days vacation this week with my wife, our younger daughter, our 4 dogs, and no computer (and I don't own a smart phone), but when I return, it will exciting to see what Trebizond coins others have posted. Kindest regards.

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@voulgaroktonou, it's always a pleasure to see your amazing Constantine XI examples!  If you get a chance when you're back from your short holiday, I'd love to hear how Bendall confirmed the identify of these smaller denominations.  I'm imagining the larger denominations have enough legend to assign them to Constantine, and that there's a close enough match to the eighths?

I love the Runciman book. 🙂

I haven't kept up with the thread for various reasons, so I'll drop in all the emperors I've missed in one big mass. For the most part I've restricted myself to one example per personality, though I had an extra slot and so stuck in both AR and AE for Andy II and Mike IX.

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And before we get to Trebizond, here's my example of one of the first coins to come out of the Ottoman mint of Constantinople after the conquest.  It's an akçe dated 865 AH = 1460/61, the mint's first year of operation:

mehmetconstantinople.jpg.26fc9aab4a648f3caa55481b45a082e6.jpg

 

Now time for the denouement!

Edited by Severus Alexander
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12 hours ago, Severus Alexander said:

@voulgaroktonou, it's always a pleasure to see your amazing Constantine XI examples!  If you get a chance when you're back from your short holiday, I'd love to hear how Bendall confirmed the identify of these smaller denominations.  I'm imagining the larger denominations have enough legend to assign them to Constantine, and that there's a close enough match to the eighths?

I love the Runciman book. 🙂

I haven't kept up with the thread for various reasons, so I'll drop in all the emperors I've missed in one big mass. For the most part I've restricted myself to one example per personality, though I had an extra slot and so stuck in both AR and AE for Andy II and Mike IX.

My friend, @Severus Alexander, thank you for your kind words . When we return from our short holiday (with our 4 dogs, it is going to be a bit hectic, if full of slobbery wet kisses - especially if the dogs follow my wife's enthusiastic expressions of affection) - OK, that's a dumb joke, but I could not resist it..., we'll talk about the attribution of those scrappy little eighths! 

You've got some beautiful coins there that you've just shown! I especially like that one with the cute seraph! And THANK YOU and EVERYONE for this wonderful portrait thread - there have been so many great coins, wonderful historic maps, and much interesting information!

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Seems I may not be alone in having few coins from the "Empire" of Trebizond.  In fact, this is my only one!  I hope others can rectify this in the coming days...

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Empire of Trebizond, Manuel I Comnenus AR Asper. Circa AD 1238-1263. St. Eugenius standing facing, holding long cross; O AΓIO to left, ЄVΓЄΝΙO to right, three pellets in triangle in inner left field / Manuel standing facing, holding labarum and akakia; manus Dei to upper right, MNHΛ to left, OKH to right. Sear 2601. 1.87g, 21mm.

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Am on vacation, without any notes, save photos, but here's my Manouel I Komnenos, asper, Sear 2601:

S2601.jpg.479f9f18d7bf339e8da5972830521290.jpg

 

Alexios II, 1297-1330. asper, Sear 2619. Obv: St. Eugenios on horseback; rev: emperor on horseback.

S2619.jpg.b4b5a5049783c01506838b94d58e703c.jpg

 

John III, 1342-1344. Æ. Sear 2624. Obv: . St. Eugenius standing facing, holding long cross; rev:  emperor standing facing, holding scepter.

S2624.jpg.68fec7df6c82fa184462f07e19a0391b.jpg

 

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My two Trebizond coins: frankly I’m not 100% sure on the sear numbers as it seems there are a few very close styles with different attributions. Feel free to correct me.

Manuel 1 1238-1263 - Asper - SB 2601 - 2.87g. Quite pleased with the detail on this one.

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John II 1280-1297 - Asper - SB 2609 - 2.84g. Double struck on reverse.

IMG_1478.jpeg.28a75084b22dffafa71b6db49430a182.jpegIMG_1479.jpeg.709d8c664b70acc7d173038ab2547073.jpeg

 

 

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I'm guessing that this thread, just like the Byzantine empire itself back in 1453, has come to an end?

I'm going to miss all of the fantastic Byzantine coins that appeared in constant streams over the past few months. I wish I had had more to contribute, but my Byzantine acquisitions only began about a year ago. I haven't reached even twenty specimens in my entire collection yet.

I'm also happy that more Byzantine collectors exist on this site than I realized. Byzantine coins seem like the "secret back room" of ancients that only a few brave (and possibly eccentric) folk tread into and stay for any length of time. I still don't know why they have captured my interest so fervently, but I'm still looking at them and buying them. An Anonymous Follis of Class G should appear in my mailbox within the next week, I hope.

Thanks again for a great ride! I hope to see more Byzantine posts here in the future!

Edited by ewomack
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For 40 years or more, the members of my local ancient coin group have lovingly referred to the objects of my passion as "UBCs", which, for the unitiated, means "ugly Byantine coins". So, indeed, it is nice to meet more people who share this acquired taste. On the other hand, I miss the days when one could purchase a nice stavraton for $12 and a solidus for $30!

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Almost draw time. (See the first post to refresh your memory about the three prizes.) According to my calculations, four people exceeded 30 portraits and so got the maximum number of ballots: @Hrefn, @sand, @Valentinian and @voulgaroktonou. (Four extraordinary collections!!) Otherwise, the ballot counts are as follows:

@Al Kowsky: 16

@Ancient Coin Hunter: 12

@Broucheion: 4

@CPK: 1

@Edessa: 5

@ewomack: 12

@Jims,Coins: 25

@John Conduitt: 1

@mc9: 9

@Nerosmyfavorite68: 17

@Octavius: 1

@O-Towner: 2

@Pellinore: 6

@Prieure de Sion: 1

@quant.geek: 2

@Rand: 9

@robinjojo: 12

@Simon: 22

@TheTrachyEnjoyer: 2

@ValiantKnight: 4

@wittwolff: 19

If you think I've made a mistake, let me know.  (There should be one ballot per legally played individual, portraits only). Remember that you can assign your prize to another Numisforums member, or ask me to redraw from the pool of players who have fewer than 10 ballots. In any case the third prize will be from that pool of less broadly experienced Byzantinists. (Hmm... that description doesn't really apply to @quant.geek or @TheTrachyEnjoyer!)

I'll leave this up for a couple days and then make the first draw sometime on Sunday. The first winner can choose from any of the 3 prize coins. (If someone wishes to add to the prize pool they're more than welcome to do so, just post a photo of the coin below.)

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