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31 minutes ago, ambr0zie said:

No, but knowing we are fans of the same auction house, I checked to see if it's recent. 

From that auction I picked my glorious Marius and 2 very nice Faustina II imperials (very nice on a serious note). 

I also like Laodicea provincials and I have 2 of them. A Macrinus and a Pius, Macrinus being also a very good deal. 

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They work well together too, showing the two phases of the base metal mint: Greek local/provincial and Latin colonial.

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A couple new coins from the last Leu auction have finally arrived!

First coin auction description:
KINGS OF MACEDON. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 14.31 g, 3 h), Amphipolis, struck under Antipater or Polyperchon, circa 320/19-317. Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ Young jockey, holding palm frond in his right hand and reins in his left, riding horse to right; below horse, monogram; below raised foreleg, Λ. Le Rider pl. 45, 6. SNG ANS 633-4. Attractively toned and with a bold head of Zeus of unusually fine style for a posthumous issue. Light marks and with minor flan faults on the reverse, otherwise, good very fine.    From an American collection, privately acquired from Ariadne Galleries prior to 1982.

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This coin had an unlisted provenance: ex Glendining June 18, 1943 Lot 35

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-----------

Second coin auction description:
SELEUKID KINGS. Seleukos IV Philopator, 187-175 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 30 mm, 17.18 g, 12 h), Antiochia on the Orontes. Diademed head of Seleukos IV to right. Rev. BAΣIΛΕΩΣ - ΣΕΛEYKOY Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrow in his right hand and resting his left on grounded bow; to outer left, wreath and filleted palm frond; in exergue, monogram. HGC 9, 580e. SC 1313.1. Beautifully toned and with a splendid portrait. Light scratches on the obverse and with a minor flan fault on the reverse, otherwise, good very fine.    Ex Leu Web Auction 20, 17 July 2022, 1545 and Numismatica Ars Classica 123, 9 May 2021, 819, and previously privately acquired from Vinchon on 24 February 2011.

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This coin also had an unlisted provenance: ex Etienne Bourgey March 22, 1910 Lot 434

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Very happy to be able to pick these up.

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My latest Victory from Tiber Numismatics Auction 4:
AcrasosLydiasemi-autonomousAE17200-268ADDionysosandNike.png.1c9ae424fac7061a5345760d8ff21a19.png

Acrasos, Lydia, semi-autonomous
200-268 AD
AE17
Obverse: Head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy
Reverse: AKΡACIΩTΩN, Nike walking right, holding wreath and palm branch

Shipping, buyer's fee, and taxes cost almost as much as the coin did...but it's not one I had so I'm ok paying ~$17 total 🙂

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A new Herakles from Maeonia in Lydia to complement the bearded one from Sala that I had. I got away from modern collecting a long time ago, but here I am collecting sets again!

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Lydia, Sala, Pseudo-autonomous Æ 1/3 assarion
Circa 2nd - 3rd century AD
Obverse: Bearded, laureate head of Herakles right. 
Reverse: СΑΛΗ-ΝΩΝ; Grape bunch on vine. 
References: SNG von Aulock -; SNG Cop  433-4; BMC 24; GRPC Lydia 35; Lindgren & Kovacs 798.
Size: 15mm
Weight: 2.18g
Die axis: 11h

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Lydia, Maeonia, Pseudo-autonomous issue, possibly Time of Hadrian, Æ 15 mm
117-138 AD
Obverse: Laureate and draped bust of Herakles right.
Reverse: ΜΑΙΟΝΩΝ; Club and bow in bowcase, bee above.
References: RPC III 2428; SNG Copenhagen 217; SNG von Aulock 3008.
Size: 15 mm
Weight: 1.92 g

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A small 13mm 2.14g brassy 'leaded bronze' unit minted at Lampsacus in Mysia for Augustus:

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And who's that on the reverse?

It's the ithyphallic Priapus with his erection, luckily preserved in full despite the overall worn and corroded condition of the coin.

Edited by seth77
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Posted (edited)

I had no particular "need" for this coin -- not that I ever really do! -- but I really liked the portrait of Maximinus I on the obverse, and the very detailed Victory on the reverse, complete with a small German captive commemorating Maximinus's victories in Germania. 

Maximinus I Thrax AR Denarius, 236-238 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Rev. Victory standing front, head to left, holding wreath in her outstretched right hand and palm frond in her left hand in front of her wings; at her feet to left, German captive seated left, head turned back to right, hands probably tied behind his back, VICTO – RIA GERM. 20 mm., 2.54 g., 12 h. RIC IV-2 23; RSC III 107 (ill. p. 154); BMCRE VI 186-187; Sear RCV III 8318 (ill. p. 80). Purchased from Leu Numismatik AG, Winterthur, Switzerland, Web Auction 29, 25 Feb. 2024, Lot 2235; ex Leu Numismatik AG Web Auction 7, 24 Feb. 2019, Lot 1218; from the S. Pozzi Collection [N.B.: not the famous Dr. Samuel Jean Pozzi (1846-1918), but a different person who was still alive in the late 20th Century!]; ex Peter Höfer FPL 9, June 1981, Lot 277.  

image.jpeg.8364ef64552994b8bfe8e556172b395b.jpeg

Perhaps Leu was a bit disingenuous in its 2019 auction of the so-called "S. Pozzi Collection," which it presented without expressly stating that the collection had nothing to do with the famous Pozzi Collection? Leu didn't even implicitly disclose that fact by giving the "new" S. Pozzi's full first name; only the initial. Yes, anyone who read the descriptions carefully would realize that this Pozzi was still alive in the late 20th century, and anyone familiar with the "real" S. Pozzi would know he died a century ago. But I still think there was something a bit shady about the way Leu handled this. I can't help wondering how many people bought "S. Pozzi" coins from Leu's 2019 auction believing they were purchasing coins that had once belonged to the original Dr. Pozzi.  Perhaps even this coin, given how relatively quickly it was offered again? After all, the hammer price was 50 CHF lower this time than in 2019.  (I wasn't under any illusions myself, since I did a little research before bidding, and am very pleased with the coin!)

A second question: does anyone have any explanation of why there's that small "tab" sticking out at 3:00 on the obverse? Not that I ever would, but every time I see it, I feel an impulse to reach out and snap it off at the dotted line, like a saltine!  Could it possibly be left over from the process of casting blanks or flans, which, I believe I recall reading, sometimes involved a series of molds attached to each other that were subsequently broken apart?

Finally, I've been unable to find out anything regarding the  Höfer fixed price lists from the 1970s/1980s, other than the fact that his first name was Peter. I don't even know what country he was in -- presumably Germany or Switzerland. If anyone is aware of anything more, I'd appreciate your letting me know.

 

Edited by DonnaML
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Hello all,

This is my first post on the forum I'm excited to get to know everyone and check out some of your awesome collections, learn stuff and talk with like-minded people.

Here are my two recent pickups from LEU. I primarily collect tetradrachm of the Diadochi but I got something quite different this time and went for a Persian Daric. As well as a tet of Antiochos the Great, one of my favourite Seleucid Kings. I'm really in love with the strike on this tetradrachm and the detail on it, I have had a hard time finding one of Antiochos III that stood out to me so this one has fit that bill.. 

let me know what you think! 

SELEUKID KINGS. Antiochos III ‘the Great’, 222-187 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 27 mm, 16.69 g, 12 h), Nisibis, circa 211-209/8. Diademed head of Antiochos III to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ

PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II, circa 420-375 BC. Daric (Gold, 18 mm, 8.33 g, 12 h), Lydo-Milesian standard, Sardes

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56 minutes ago, CassiusMarcus said:

Hello all,

This is my first post on the forum I'm excited to get to know everyone and check out some of your awesome collections, learn stuff and talk with like-minded people.

Here are my two recent pickups from LEU. I primarily collect tetradrachm of the Diadochi but I got something quite different this time and went for a Persian Daric. As well as a tet of Antiochos the Great, one of my favourite Seleucid Kings. I'm really in love with the strike on this tetradrachm and the detail on it, I have had a hard time finding one of Antiochos III that stood out to me so this one has fit that bill.. 

let me know what you think! 

SELEUKID KINGS. Antiochos III ‘the Great’, 222-187 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 27 mm, 16.69 g, 12 h), Nisibis, circa 211-209/8. Diademed head of Antiochos III to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ

PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II, circa 420-375 BC. Daric (Gold, 18 mm, 8.33 g, 12 h), Lydo-Milesian standard, Sardes

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Lovely! Stunning level of details on Antiochus' eye

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2 hours ago, CassiusMarcus said:

Hello all,

This is my first post on the forum I'm excited to get to know everyone and check out some of your awesome collections, learn stuff and talk with like-minded people.

Here are my two recent pickups from LEU. I primarily collect tetradrachm of the Diadochi but I got something quite different this time and went for a Persian Daric. As well as a tet of Antiochos the Great, one of my favourite Seleucid Kings. I'm really in love with the strike on this tetradrachm and the detail on it, I have had a hard time finding one of Antiochos III that stood out to me so this one has fit that bill.. 

let me know what you think! 

SELEUKID KINGS. Antiochos III ‘the Great’, 222-187 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 27 mm, 16.69 g, 12 h), Nisibis, circa 211-209/8. Diademed head of Antiochos III to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ

PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II, circa 420-375 BC. Daric (Gold, 18 mm, 8.33 g, 12 h), Lydo-Milesian standard, Sardes

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Man! What a great opening post! Those are beautiful coins - I've often dreamed of buying a daric some day but for now I have to be happy with sigloi. 😉

Welcome to the Forum!

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3 hours ago, CassiusMarcus said:

Hello all,

This is my first post on the forum I'm excited to get to know everyone and check out some of your awesome collections, learn stuff and talk with like-minded people.

Here are my two recent pickups from LEU. I primarily collect tetradrachm of the Diadochi but I got something quite different this time and went for a Persian Daric. As well as a tet of Antiochos the Great, one of my favourite Seleucid Kings. I'm really in love with the strike on this tetradrachm and the detail on it, I have had a hard time finding one of Antiochos III that stood out to me so this one has fit that bill.. 

let me know what you think! 

SELEUKID KINGS. Antiochos III ‘the Great’, 222-187 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 27 mm, 16.69 g, 12 h), Nisibis, circa 211-209/8. Diademed head of Antiochos III to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ

PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II, circa 420-375 BC. Daric (Gold, 18 mm, 8.33 g, 12 h), Lydo-Milesian standard, Sardes

IMG_3507.jpg

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IMG_3501.jpg

Welcome! I saw your post over on reddit a bit ago. Those are amazing!
Glad to have you here.

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My latest coin is this Trajan sestertius for a denomination set of Trajan I am building.

 

Trajan, Sestertius, Rome Mint, Struck 114-117.

Obverse Design: Draped bust of Trajan right.

Obverse Legends: IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P

Reverse Design: Felicitas draped facing left holding caduceus and cornucopia.

Reverse Legend: SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS S C

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Posted · Supporter

Welcome @CassiusMarcus! Now that's how to show up to the party🤩 I've been after a Persian daric for a while. But there's the whole paying for one thing...

As for my latest, I was going to do a write up on this Celtic rarity and it's little known tribe of origin, but Celtic posts don't get much traction. So here it is:

Screenshot_20240317_163302_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.fba78457f686cb732ab5350118c2c3dc.png

CELTIC IMITATIONS OF MAGNA GRAECIA

MELDES/Meldis (Meaux region) 60-40 BCE, bronze, 16.6mm, 2.8g.

Degree of rarity: R1

 No. in reference works: LT.7617 - DT.587 - BN.7616-7630 - RIG.163 - Sch/GB.512

Obverse legend: E[PENOS].

Obverse description: Male head on the left, long, curly hair, legend in front of the face; gritted.

Reverse legend: EPHNOS.

Reverse description: Horse galloping to the right, wavy tail, surmounted by a facing bird/ winged rider with outstretched wings, a ringlet pointed below; legend under the horse globule surmounted by a crescent.

Unearthed 2023 Burgundy region of France. 

" The bird which surmounts the horse may be a distortion of a winged rider, present for example on certain Gallic silver and bronze coins. The attribution of this coinage is confirmed to the Meldes despite a very important distribution map on the territories of the Suessions and the Bellovaques. These coins were first reported in Meaux with ROVECA epigraph coins. B. Fischer proposes a ligature between an I and the P; which would give a legend EIPENOS, EPIENOS or even EPLENOS; she opts, in view of various examples of epigraphies, for the legend EPIENOS.

History: The Meldes are only mentioned once in Caesar's work. This small people lived between the Seine and the Marne in the Brie plain with Meaux as its capital. The Meldes emancipated themselves late from the tutelage of the Suessions and the Remes at the time of the Gallic War. Having become independent in 57 BC, the Meldes chose to ally themselves with the Romans. Caesar had sixty ships built among the Meldes, in 55 BC, for the expedition to Brittany. Caesar (BG. V, 5)."

Edited by Ryro
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Here's a fairly rare provincial of Augustus I recently came across...

 

Augustus37.jpg.652b9f51670440a0d1b19f3b0b52ceff.jpg

 

AEOLIS, Aegae.
Augustus, 27 BC-AD14. Diphilos Phaita, magistrate.
Æ21, 6.4g, 12h.
Obv.: Bare head right.
Rev.: Apollo standing right, holding taenia and laurel branch. 
Ref.: RPC I 2427. Only ten recorded in RPC.

 

Edited by JAZ Numismatics
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Posted (edited)

In my disorganized quest to acquire anything round or roundish, made of some sort of metal and appears older than I am, here's a new style Athenian tetradrachm from the time of Sulla (86-84 AD).

Just an overview of Margaret Thompson's plates indicates that lots of these owls appear to have been produced under Sulla, driven it appears by our old friend economic necessity.  He needed all the money that he could lay his hands during the war with Mithridates and his allies which included Athens.  Having starved Athens into capitulation following a brutal siege in 87 AD, he spared the city from total destruction, merely sacking it, a time-honored practice.  These owls were issued in the ensuing few years following the fall of Athens.

The owls produced during his occupation are quite distinctive both in their obverse treatment of Athena and the owl on the reverse.  The engraving styles can range from good to crude attempts, compared to prior new style owls, indicating that die engravers of varying artistic abilities were employed by the mint.  Coins had to be produced quickly, to meet Sulla's demands, a very familiar situation. 

I've been looking some time for a decent type owl from this turbulent period in the histories of Rome and Greece.  What I ended up with is a midrange coin grade-wise.  The French firm graded it as an EF.  There is no way that this coin is anywhere close.  I don't know why they do this, but if you get beyond that issue and just judge the coin on its own merits and faults, good purchases from them are still possible.  To me this coin grades Fine, maybe a good Fine for wear with good centering, given the narrower flan.  There might also be a case of worn dies, especially on the obverse.  A beauty it is not, but it is quite a historical coin.

This coin is one of the cruder examples, struck on a typically narrower flan, resulting is some detail off the flan, but the centering is decent.  The weight is within the range of other examples listed in the Thompson catalog.  The closest match with the Sulla new style owls in the Thompson plates is 1303a.

Athens under Roman rule, new style owl, 86-84 AD.   ΛAYPIA M[E]TAΛΛA monograms on reverse.  Month "A" on the amphora (quite weak).

Sulla, Group I, Thompson 1303a.

24mm; 16.43 grams

D-CameraAthensnewstyleowl86-84ADSullaT1303a24mm16.43gAYPIAMETAAonreverse.3-21-24.jpg.20f3aa0c54f1c534005ae3ed869afef2.jpg

Perhaps this coin is a die match, at least of the obverse, for 1303a?  Here's the Thompson catalog photo:

AthensNewStyleowlThompson1303acatalogphoto3-23-24.jpg.20414c3fdd023f9fa8edd413768d974c.jpg

 

Edited by robinjojo
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On 3/20/2024 at 2:43 PM, DonnaML said:

I had no particular "need" for this coin -- not that I ever really do! -- but I really liked the portrait of Maximinus I on the obverse, and the very detailed Victory on the reverse, complete with a small German captive commemorating Maximinus's victories in Germania. 

Maximinus I Thrax AR Denarius, 236-238 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Rev. Victory standing front, head to left, holding wreath in her outstretched right hand and palm frond in her left hand in front of her wings; at her feet to left, German captive seated left, head turned back to right, hands probably tied behind his back, VICTO – RIA GERM. 20 mm., 2.54 g., 12 h. RIC IV-2 23; RSC III 107 (ill. p. 154); BMCRE VI 186-187; Sear RCV III 8318 (ill. p. 80). Purchased from Leu Numismatik AG, Winterthur, Switzerland, Web Auction 29, 25 Feb. 2024, Lot 2235; ex Leu Numismatik AG Web Auction 7, 24 Feb. 2019, Lot 1218; from the S. Pozzi Collection [N.B.: not the famous Dr. Samuel Jean Pozzi (1846-1918), but a different person who was still alive in the late 20th Century!]; ex Peter Höfer FPL 9, June 1981, Lot 277.  

image.jpeg.8364ef64552994b8bfe8e556172b395b.jpeg

Perhaps Leu was a bit disingenuous in its 2019 auction of the so-called "S. Pozzi Collection," which it presented without expressly stating that the collection had nothing to do with the famous Pozzi Collection? Leu didn't even implicitly disclose that fact by giving the "new" S. Pozzi's full first name; only the initial. Yes, anyone who read the descriptions carefully would realize that this Pozzi was still alive in the late 20th century, and anyone familiar with the "real" S. Pozzi would know he died a century ago. But I still think there was something a bit shady about the way Leu handled this. I can't help wondering how many people bought "S. Pozzi" coins from Leu's 2019 auction believing they were purchasing coins that had once belonged to the original Dr. Pozzi.  Perhaps even this coin, given how relatively quickly it was offered again? After all, the hammer price was 50 CHF lower this time than in 2019.  (I wasn't under any illusions myself, since I did a little research before bidding, and am very pleased with the coin!)

A second question: does anyone have any explanation of why there's that small "tab" sticking out at 3:00 on the obverse? Not that I ever would, but every time I see it, I feel an impulse to reach out and snap it off at the dotted line, like a saltine!  Could it possibly be left over from the process of casting blanks or flans, which, I believe I recall reading, sometimes involved a series of molds attached to each other that were subsequently broken apart?

Finally, I've been unable to find out anything regarding the  Höfer fixed price lists from the 1970s/1980s, other than the fact that his first name was Peter. I don't even know what country he was in -- presumably Germany or Switzerland. If anyone is aware of anything more, I'd appreciate your letting me know.

 

Donna! That is BEAUTIFUL! 
Such a great portrait and the depiction of Victory on the reverse...
chef's kiss Meaning & Origin | Slang by Dictionary.com

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On 3/20/2024 at 12:23 PM, CassiusMarcus said:

Hello all,

This is my first post on the forum I'm excited to get to know everyone and check out some of your awesome collections, learn stuff and talk with like-minded people.

Here are my two recent pickups from LEU. I primarily collect tetradrachm of the Diadochi but I got something quite different this time and went for a Persian Daric. As well as a tet of Antiochos the Great, one of my favourite Seleucid Kings. I'm really in love with the strike on this tetradrachm and the detail on it, I have had a hard time finding one of Antiochos III that stood out to me so this one has fit that bill.. 

let me know what you think! 

SELEUKID KINGS. Antiochos III ‘the Great’, 222-187 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 27 mm, 16.69 g, 12 h), Nisibis, circa 211-209/8. Diademed head of Antiochos III to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ

PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II, circa 420-375 BC. Daric (Gold, 18 mm, 8.33 g, 12 h), Lydo-Milesian standard, Sardes

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Really neat tetradrachm!

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3 hours ago, robinjojo said:

The French firm graded it as an EF.  There is no way that this coin is anywhere close. 

A French dealer? Considering that most of them will call any old slug "AU," I'm amazed that your dealer was so modest with respect to your coin.

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Picked this one up from a coin store. My first Hieron II.

HieronII_HorseRider_AE26_AEcoins_combined.jpg.660b237e17bdeca874a79fe33d89fa1c.jpg

Hieron II, Greek Sicily, Syracuse, 270 – 215 BC, AE26, Syracuse, 25.8mm, 17.1grams.

Obv: Diademed head to left. Rev: Armored cavalryman on horseback and holding spear, riding to right; N below, IERΩNOΣ in ex. CNS-195; HCG-2, 1548

 

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I just got the USPS signature required slip in my mailbox for my Leu Tribute Penny, so it has arrived after a slight delay in customs. Will probably post it on Monday after I pick it up at the post office and take my own photos. 

"Render unto Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's"

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I bought my first medieval coin from Western Europe:

IMG_3163.jpeg.ed9efb9aaf851c59e3fb5055e71b67a5.jpeg
 

IMG_3164.jpeg.8795bf0a6efb687c5698c7ac92547229.jpeg

IMG_3165.jpeg.21bfb9c6c2b5f13e4609a138df30e9a7.jpeg

The Time of the Crusades, French Feudal Counts of Angouleme 1200-1270 AD AR Denier, 18.7mm, 0.71g O: +lodoicvs, Central cross R: +egolissime, Central cross, Three amulets, One crescent. Poey d’Avant # 2663

 

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I’ve been getting a bunch of Byzantine (and a few others in). This one isn’t rare but dang is it a nice quality piece. Got very lucky with the purchase, willing to take a risk on possible BD that was just some easily removed malachite.

IMG_6596.jpeg.5a6dd343e51047a390db0f70266499a6.jpegIMG_6597.jpeg.28684a530979c4238808d79d3a61b1c2.jpeg

Justinian 1 - Follis - Year 14 - Constantinople - 22.16g - SB 163

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