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Posted · Supporter
15 minutes ago, ela126 said:

I’ve been getting a bunch of Byzantine (and a few others in). This one isn’t rare but dang is it a nice quality piece. Got very lucky with the purchase, willing to take a risk on possible BD that was just some easily removed malachite.

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Justinian 1 - Follis - Year 14 - Constantinople - 22.16g - SB 163

High grade and a beautiful patina!

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This coin with an interesting portrait of Hadrian - looking almost clean shaven..."Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them, in money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history."

-FORVM Ancient Coins: Liberalitas

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Hadrian, 117-138. Denarius (Silver, 19 mm, 3.66 g, 6 h), Rome, circa late 120-121. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG

Obv: Laureate head of Hadrian to right.

Rev: P M TR P COS III / LIBERAL AVG / III Hadrian seated left on curule chair set on platform, extending his right hand toward citizen standing right, holding out fold of toga.

Ref: BMC 291. Cohen 908. RIC 308.

compare

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Posted (edited)

I picked this one up at the post office today. A "Tribute Penny" of Tiberius. Livia, of course, is featured on the reverse. I just photographed it.

AR denarius 19mm 3.85 grams

Leu web auction 29 24-26 Feb 2024 lot 1844

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Edited by Ancient Coin Hunter
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Posted · Supporter
6 minutes ago, Ancient Coin Hunter said:

I picked this one up at the post office today. A "Tribute Penny" of Tiberius. Livia, of course, is featured on the reverse. I just photographed it.

AR denarius 19mm 3.85 grams

Leu web auction 29 24-26 Feb 2024 lot 1844

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That's a superb example!

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My latest purchase comes from N&N London.  It is a follis of Justinian I struck in regnal year XIII in the city of Antioch, which would correspond to AD 539/40.  This was the first year that Justinian’s post-reform folles were struck in Antioch.  The year after this coin was struck, Antioch would be attacked and depopulated by Persia.  When minting resumed, the mint mark would begin with a TH instead of a theta.  

At first I thought I had an unusual variant in the exergue’ s inscription, but now I believe the reverse is slightly double struck.  

This coin is huge, 40 mm in diameter, and weighs 22 grams.  

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You can learn everything you wish to know about Antiochian folles at this website.

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/interesting/Justinian.html

Edited by Hrefn
Follis not solidus
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8 hours ago, Hrefn said:

My latest purchase comes from N&N London.  It is a solidus of Justinian I struck in regnal year XIII in the city of Antioch, which would correspond to AD 539/40.  This was the first year that Justinian’s post-reform folles were struck in Antioch.  The year after this coin was struck, Antioch would be attacked and depopulated by Persia.  When minting resumed, the mint mark would begin with a TH instead of a theta.  

At first I thought I had an unusual variant in the exergue’ s inscription, but now I believe the reverse is slightly double struck.  

This coin is huge, 40 mm in diameter, and weighs 22 grams.  

image.jpeg.e254ae165c9f89fce0473df01692be7d.jpegimage.jpeg.f4f64268c5509f01133a6597e53e0a30.jpeg

You can learn everything you wish to know about Antiochian folles at this website.

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/interesting/Justinian.html

Awesome piece. i've had my eye on a year 13 Antioch. i'd say the have the most pleasing front Portrait of any of Justinian's coins. Great pickup.

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I love the delicate script on this coin...

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Nero Æ 22mm of Prymnessus, Phrygia. AD 54-68. Ti. Ioulios Proklos, magistrate. NEPΩNA KAIΣAPA ΠPYMNHΣΣEIΣ, laureate head to right / ΕΠΙ • ΤΙ • ΙΟΥΛΙΟΥ ΠΡΟΚΛΟΥ, Dikaiosyne standing facing, head to left, holding scales and grain ears. RPC I 3207; Von Aulock Phrygien II 1022-31. 6.60g, 22mm, 12h.

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A late joint reign ant of Gallienus:

IMP GALLIENVS AVG: Radiate and cuirassed bust right.
PAX AVGG: Pax standing left, holding branch and scepter.
V in left field. 
5th emission of Rome.

MIR 208d (10 ex), RIC 341.

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Edited by Molag Bal
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1 hour ago, JAZ Numismatics said:

Those Vota types are typically very well struck, and easy to find in EF grades. Sometimes it's hard to believe they're ancient coins. Great choice for a first follis!

Thanks! And their prices are Very good. A good choice for those beginning

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Gaul, Vienna. Octavian, with Divus Julius Caesar. 30 BC. Æ Dupondius (31mm, 17.46g, 12h). Obv: •IMP• above, CAESAR below, DIVI•IVLI• to left, •DIVI•F to right; Bare heads of Julius Caesar and Octavian, back-to-back. Rev: C•I• V; Prows of colliding quinquiremes at the battle of Actium. Ref: Unpublished, deserving of further research!

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Roman warship at the Battle of Actium. Mediterranean, 31BC. By Rado ...

For your collecting pleasure, PutridRatingHighPrice offers an absolutely unique and unresearched historic coin depicting ships battling during Octavian's victory at Actium over Mark Antony and Cleopatra. The coin also honors his adopted father, Julius Caesar. No other ancient coin known depicts ships ramming each other in battle. This is a truly unique item and comes with our lifetime guarantee of authenticity.

This gem can be yours for not a billion USD, not 750 million USD, but for the low, low price of only $454 million USD. Shipping and insurance in the continental US for only $50 extra, or you may pick this coin up yourself in our stall in the Lekki Market in Lagos, Nigeria. Open seven days a week from 9am to 6pm. COA can be provided for another $150 USD.

 

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Posted · Supporter

A snack as I missed out on a coin I was after. Didn´t have a Maximianus

Maximianus, AE radiate fraction. 295-299 AD. Cyzicus. IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA MI-LITVM, Emperor standing right, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, standing left and holding sceptre. KΔ in lower centre. RIC VI Cyzicus 16B.

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Small mail day last week 

First, is an upgrade - an unassuming coin of a major rarity in the Roman Imperial set - Commodus with his younger brother Annius Verus. Annius Verus is known only from this type (two obverse legend variants of the same type), a couple types of medallion, and *possibly* the "four seasons" series of quadrans, although I believe the last has been debunked.

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The old coin, which I suppose now I need to figure out the best way to sell....

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And secondly, a type I had my eye on for a while and finally won a middling specimen at a lowball bid

AE10 of Spithridates, Achaemenid satrap of Lydia. Best known for being the man who almost killed Alexander the Great at the Battle of Granicus - he was about to land a blow from behind when one of Alexander's generals cut his arm off, saving Alexander's life.

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