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CPK

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Here's my latest ancient: a Leukas Stater. Rather worn, sure, but a coin I'm extremely happy with.聽馃槃image.png.dd5da7f1375374b3c97fe0eb01766730.png

Akarnania, Leukas, 400-330 BC, AR stater
Obv. Pegasos with pointed wing flying to right, Lambda below, Rev. head of Athena to right Corinthian helmet over a leather cap with caduceus behind and Lambda behind head

I've also made a little introductory article about the staters of Leukas, it's aimed for beginners but you can access it here聽if you'd like! 馃檪

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2 I received Friday. Already posted in other threads but here they are. VRBS/Roma which I wanted in my collection regardless of condition and an Aurelian, an Emperor I didn't yet have.

CityCommemorative.jpg.2c039d76f717d4da615cb5c74f688567.jpgAurelian270-275CE.jpg.16b013aa6f3814311a6d0d935acfda70.jpg

Edited by expat
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I don't want to let the thread fall asleep, so I'll show two coins that I was able to buy at an auction today. Nothing extraordinarily special - nevertheless I found these two pieces quite nice, so I couldn't resist.聽

Here is an Adventus coin of Septimius Severus. The portrait is not the best - but I liked the reverse with the, in my opinion, quite detailed depiction.

image.png.a1420de4836f8c778b88789b4145fff8.png

Lucius Septimius Severus Pertinax
Denarius of the Roman Imperial Period 196/197 AD;聽Material: Silver;聽Diameter: 18mm;聽Weight: 3.78g;聽Mint: Rom;聽Reference: RIC IV Septimius Severus 74;聽Obverse:Head of Septimius Severus, laureate, right. The Inscription reads: L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII for Lucius Septimius Severus Pertinax Augustus, Imperator Octavum (Lucius Septimius Severus Pertinax, Augustus, Imperator for the eighth time);聽Reverse:聽Septimius Severus, in military attire, on horse prancing right, raising right hand. The Inscription reads: ADVENTVI AVG FELICISSIMO for Adventui Augusti Felicissimo (The most auspicious return of the Augustus).

Comment:聽This legend appears on the reverse of a large brass of Septimius Severus. The type represents the emperor on horseback, either alone, or preceded by a soldier on foot. - After having reestablished peace in the east by the destruction of Pescennius Niger, and with the design of marching against Albinus, Severus returned to Rome, where his entry was magnificent. That was the same Felicissimus Adventus - "the most auspicious return" - which is alluded to here.

Capt. Smyth (p. 186) assigns the return to Rome which this device commemorates, to the year 196 of the Christian era; and adds - "The first public entry of Severus was under every possible demonstration of joy: yet he committed unheard-of cruelties. After commending the character of Commodus to the Senators, who had declared his memory infamous, he executed a number of their body, without trial; and Rome was filled with bloodshed. At the same time, however, he executed retributive justice on the insolent, venal, and treacherous Praetorians, whom he disarmed, degraded and ignominiously banished to the distance of a hundred miles from Rome."

In describing an Adventus coin of the elder Philip, whose equestrian figure is represented with the same "extraordinary disproportion between the steed and its rider," as is exhibited on the above reverse of Severus, the intelligent writer above quoted, obverses (p. 266) - "the Emperor is probably mounted on the Asturco, or ambling nag, as a more appropriate emblem of returning peace, than the Equus bellator, or charger." - This is a shrewd conjecture; but it does not fully account for the under-sized horses on which we see emperors mounted, in various types of the Roman mint. These, indeed, are for the most part relatively diminutive, whether the imperial rider is wearing the pacific toga, or in the garb of war - under the legend ADVENTVS, or that of EXERCITVS.

Source Numiswiki:
https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=ADVENTVI AVG FELICISSIMO

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And then I was lucky enough to buy this Probus Securitas coin at an auction. I just liked the extremely good quality and condition of the coin - and of course the beautiful brown patina.

image.png.5a855751a7a56422306c8170b89a2376.png

Marcus Aurelius Probus, as Imperator Caesar Marcus Aurelius Probus Augustus
Antoninianus of the Roman Imperial Period 276/282 AD;聽Material: BI;聽Diameter: 23mm;聽Weight: 3.87g;聽Mint: Ticinum;聽Reference: RIC V Probus 573;聽Obverse:聽Bust of Probus, radiate, cuirassed, right. The Inscription reads: IMP C PROBVS AVG for Imperator Caesar Probus Augustus;聽Reverse:聽Securitas, draped, standing left, legs crossed, leaning on column, raising right hand to head; 螕XXI in exergue. The Inscription reads: SECVRIT PERP for Securitas Perpetua (To perpetual security).

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A silver siliqua of Julian the Apostate, VOT X MULT XX, from the mint at Arelate, despite the mint mark which might suggest Constantinople, as evidenced by the eagle in the medallion on the top of the wreath. 聽From the Harptree hoard, discovered in 1887, one of almost 1500 siliqua concealed together. 聽I love the toning, which I believe is shared by most of these coins. 聽But I particularly love the almost satyr-like depiction of the pagan emperor. 聽 It is a nice complement to my coin imitating an issue of Lugdunum, on which Julian looks like an elf. 聽

75D394BC-7B49-48AE-9EF1-7F87323FF2A0.jpeg.9a8188e820006a596ae8c74ca0925fe2.jpeg5E0E3FFF-EEE9-4755-8989-4A0BE4DADB36.jpeg.ceab8e878d494cf17277f2cd5bfda2a9.jpeg

image.jpeg.4c73378ef730d1f9553ab34b8db83739.jpegimage.jpeg.d6821981b6189f5f6771fed7d6817531.jpeg

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Posted · Supporter
Posted (edited)

Continuing my collection of Constantine family portraits, here is one I got in today:

fausta.jpg.ed11b3dfd34b4d934442e69a79ab34e8.jpg

I am particularly happy with this one for a couple reasons. First of all, as I have been finding, the Rome mint seemed to produce some of the best Constantinian portraiture (See my Rome mint portrait of Constantine I here). This Fausta portrait from the Rome mint is about as nicely done as any I've seen.

Second, as I was contemplating purchasing it, I did a quick search for Rome mint Fausta coins and found this very coin had been sold through CNG a few years ago, as part of a group lot of three:

Auction Lot (cngcoins.com)

Screenshot2023-03-11164608.png.3728f493fb136e0835f75e6aeb7fb690.png

And finally (and best of all!) as you can see from the CNG listing, this coin came from the collection of Giovanni Dattari, a very well-known 19th-century collector of ancient coins, notably Alexandrian coinage, but also many others as well. A great write-up about Giovanni Dattari and his famous collection can be read here, written by @Ocatarinetabellatchitchix

Neither the CNG listing nor the Dattari provenance was given in the dealer's listing. The coin had already been on my watch list, and when I discovered the 100+ year-old provenance I did not hesitate to purchase!

Needless to say I am very happy with my new coin and am now on the lookout for a Rome-mint Helena or Crispus coin. 馃槈

Oh by the way, when I was looking up the RIC number on OCRE I couldn't find any with that particular obverse legend (hence the "var." in my photo). If anyone who has the official published RIC could check for me I'd be greatly obliged!

*EDIT* I have been assisted in finding the correct RIC number and have updated the photo accordingly.

Edited by CPK
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I got a few from Tintinna during the week.

This is one of them - Cr. 472/2 - scarcer than the variety with Juno Sospita on the obverse (Cr. 472/1).

Moneyer: L. Papius Celsus
Coin: Silver Denarius
TRIVMPVS - Laureate head of Triumphus, right, with trophy over shoulder
L路PAPIVS CELSVS路III路VIR - Wolf, right, placing stick on fire; on right, eagle fanning flames
Mint: Rome (45 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.61g / 18mm / -
References:
  • RSC 3 (Papia)
  • Sydenham 965
  • Crawford 472/2
  • HCRI 83
  • RBW 1649
Acquisition: Numismatica Tintinna Online auction Asta 104 #109 25-Feb-2023

Cr472_2.jpg.489bca99587669357dfa0eba0fb9ce3a.jpg

ATB,
Aidan.

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Hi All,

I just received this unlisted monogram variety of Ceraunus' hemiobol coin.

image.png.5e41053827bbbdba3785ba00a4fb0d97.png

MACEDONIA UNDER PTOLEMY CERAUNUS AND MELEAGER
MACEDONIA, PAROREIA (CASSANDREA ???) 281 - 279 BCE

Size: 20 mm
Weight: 6.66 g
Die Axis: 6:00
Broucheion Collection G-2023-03-08.001


OBV: Zeus Dodonaios head, diademmed and wreathed, facing right. No border.
REV: Eagle on thunderbolt facing right, head turned back to left, wings closed. In upper left field: HP monogram; in right field: 螤螒巍 Monogram. No border.
border.
Refs: Lorber CPE-Unlisted (comes after CPE-B152); Svoronos-Unlisted; BMC 5.15, #65var (HP monogram)

Notes from CPE: [This variety has] been attributed to Macedonia since the nineteenth century on the basis of provenance and overstrikes, while H Gaebler (1926, pp 188-189) proposed a more specific attribution to the district of Paroreia, whose initial letters make up the monogram 螤螒巍 that appears consistently on these coins. The subject was reexamined by S Psoma (2008, pp 217-224). From overstrikes and hoards she deduced a date of issue after the reign of Demetrius Poliorcetes (294-287) but before the accession of Antigonus Gonatas in 277. Although there were numerous kings in Macedonia during this unstable period, the Zeus/eagle and Zeus/thunderbolt types could point to a Ptolemy as the issuing authority. There is a large concentration of these coins from the area around Cassandrea that may be associated with the Macedonian garrison installed in the city by Ptolemy Ceraunus in 280. Examples of the 螤螒巍 bronzes have also been found at Maroneia, where Ptolemy established another garrison in 281 as he advanced from Lysimachia to Pella.

- Broucheion

Edited by Broucheion
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My聽score聽from the聽same CNG auction. Exceptional centering for a cistophoric tet, excellent strike, minimal wear, and Priapus as a minor device! (When have you ever seen that?) Not to mention the coin might be unique with this particular date. What's not to love?

Ephesos Tet.jpg

IONIA, Ephesos.Circa 180-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26.5mm, 12.67 g, 1h). Cistophoric standard. Dated CY 57 (78/7 BC). Cista mystica with serpent; all within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; above, Priapos facing; to left, NZ (date) above E桅E, torch to right. Kleiner,Dated58; DCA 325; SNG Copenhagen 331. Lightly toned, scrape at edge on obverse. Good VF. Rare date, none in CoinArchives.

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This one arrived this morning...8 days delivery India to Spain, "impressive"!...The op has really deep relief on the reverse!

Samgrama (Sangrama) 1003-1028 AD (Start of 1st Lohara dynasty)
Copper Kaserah or Punchshi 18mm (5.45gr)
Obverse- Goddess Ardochsho/Lakshmi seated facing in half lotus position, with Nagari legend 'Sa to left 'm(n)gramara' to right
Reverse- King standing facing and sacrificing at altar holding trident, with Nagari legend 'jadeva' bottom right

20230316_132824.jpg.964e1e3c95c4a6f126d794d7e97fe08d.jpg20230316_132840.jpg.ccb6a534ec0d56b08994b5aabe48b513.jpg20230316_132927.jpg.fde9d4fdabd6d4db3c2a3c3fbd2964f2.jpg

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Posted · Supporter

Received this in the mail yesterday. I'm sort of building a collection of big-game animals on Roman coins. This was an inexpensive but (IMO) decent addition:

philip_lion.jpg.b14994dfc793910a1bc4f95723f788fc.jpg

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It was a 5-coin week - here's one of them:

Gens: Vibia
Moneyer: C. Vibius C.f. Pansa
Coin: Silver Denarius
PANSA - Mask of bearded Pan, right, with hair decorated with three rows of berries; behind, Pedum
C路VIBIVS路C路F路C路N / IOVIS路AXVR路 - Jupiter seated left, laureate, holding patera in right hand and sceptre in left hand
Mint: Rome (48 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.81g / 19mm / -
References:
  • RSC 18 (Vibia)
  • Sydenham 948
  • Crawford 449/1b
  • HCRI 20a
Acquisition: Artemide Aste Online auction Asta 62E #410 11-Mar-2023

Cr449_1b_Obv.JPG.5ad0710e947f48901459291ad191e9b6.JPGCr449_1b_Rev.JPG.b01358ff7e978a4b3c16320e42f86046.JPG

ATB,
Aidan.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted · Supporter
Posted (edited)

Here is one for @David Atherton:

vespasian_as.jpg.2cfa515c7b050ec863f47a38137ecc8b.jpg

What first drew me to this coin was the impressive portrait - done in typically fine style, and in good condition. I've also been on the lookout for nice Roman bronze as coins - and I lacked one of Vespasian. I also thought the Spes reverse would go well with my Titus (as Caesar) coin of the same type.

Then as I typically do I started researching the coin - being a left-facing portrait was a bit unusual - and I found almost no types like it online. It is the combination of the left-facing portrait with the obverse legend ending in "COS VII" - OCRE lists it as RIC II 895 but provides no examples. An extensive search on asearch.com revealed just two examples - this coin (from a couple years ago) and another one sold through Roma in 2016 (although with the Roma coin, I can't really tell from the photo; the auction description gives the RIC 895 obverse legend, but they listed it as 894 - clearly in error)

I couldn't find any currently for sale anywhere and I also searched different dealer's archived listings but couldn't find any. Nor any on wildwinds.com. It is also missing from the British collection.

Knowing that if anyone could give more information about the coin, it would be the Flavian Fanatic, I went over to Forvm Ancient Coins Gallery. Sure enough, there was an example in the Atherton collection. Here is what David Atherton聽writes:

"An extremely rare left facing portrait variant of the common COS VII Spes. The right facing variant of the type is considered by RIC (p. 51) to be the single most common bronze coin struck for Vespasian. The left facing portrait is another story! RIC cites only Berlin for the left facing variant, although the catalogue's authors Carradice and Buttrey must have known of a few other specimens in order to assign it a frequency rating of just 'rare'. I could not locate any other specimens online either in trade or in a major collection. A truly scarce coin!"聽聽(David Atherton, FORVM ANCIENT COINS Member's Gallery

That makes a total of three examples that I could find - the one Roma sold in 2016, the Atherton coin, and this one. The interesting fact of the coin's scarcity, added to the eye appeal of the portrait, was enough to tip my decision to buy.

Edited by CPK
Clarity
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3 hours ago, CPK said:

Here is one for @David Atherton:

vespasian_as.jpg.2cfa515c7b050ec863f47a38137ecc8b.jpg

What first drew me to this coin was the impressive portrait - done in typically fine style, and in good condition. I've also been on the lookout for nice Roman bronze as coins - and I lacked one of Vespasian. I also thought the Spes reverse would go well with my Titus (as Caesar) coin of the same type.

Then as I typically do I started researching the coin - being a left-facing portrait was a bit unusual - and I found almost no types like it online. It is the combination of the left-facing portrait with the obverse legend ending in "COS VII" - OCRE lists it as RIC II 895 but provides no examples. An extensive search on asearch.com revealed just two examples - this coin (from a couple years ago) and another one sold through Roma in 2016 (although with the Roma coin, I can't really tell from the photo; the auction description gives the RIC 895 obverse legend, but they listed it as 894 - clearly in error)

I couldn't find any currently for sale anywhere and I also searched different dealer's archived listings but couldn't find any. Nor any on wildwinds.com. It is also missing from the British collection.

Knowing that if anyone could give more information about the coin, it would be the Flavian Fanatic, I went over to Forvm Ancient Coins Gallery. Sure enough, there was an example in the Atherton collection. Here is what David Atherton聽writes:

"An extremely rare left facing portrait variant of the common COS VII Spes. The right facing variant of the type is considered by RIC (p. 51) to be the single most common bronze coin struck for Vespasian. The left facing portrait is another story! RIC cites only Berlin for the left facing variant, although the catalogue's authors Carradice and Buttrey must have known of a few other specimens in order to assign it a frequency rating of just 'rare'. I could not locate any other specimens online either in trade or in a major collection. A truly scarce coin!"聽聽(David Atherton, FORVM ANCIENT COINS Member's Gallery

That makes a total of three examples that I could find - the one Roma sold in 2016, the Atherton coin, and this one. The interesting fact of the coin's scarcity, added to the eye appeal of the portrait, was enough to tip my decision to buy.

Fantastic addition! Congrats!

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A late march addition. I would like to make a proper write up about it but don't find enough time/energy to do so

d1d1513dcf1346f0b01d8d92ad489948.jpg

Mn. Cordius Rufus, Denarius - Rome mint 46 BCE
RVFVS, Corinthian helmet right surmonted by an owl standing right
Retrograde MN (ligate) C O R D I V S medusa on aegis
3.75 gr - 19 mm - 3 h
Ref : HCRI # 64, RCV # 441, RRC # 463/2

Provenance : CGB e-auction 2/03/2023

Q

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Posted · Supporter
4 hours ago, David Atherton said:

Fantastic addition! Congrats!

Thanks! What do you think of this聽Roma coin? Unfortunately the last bit of obv. legend is nearly completely off-flan and I was also a little confused given then contradictory listing info. Did you come across this one in your research?

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58 minutes ago, CPK said:

Thanks! What do you think of this聽Roma coin? Unfortunately the last bit of obv. legend is nearly completely off-flan and I was also a little confused given then contradictory listing info. Did you come across this one in your research?

An error they listed it as RIC 894, it is RIC 895.

And I was unaware of this specimen! Thank you for pointing it out.

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Here's a recent arrival from a Noonan's sale.

L. Calpurnius Piso CaesoninusandQ. Servilius Caepio, Denarius,c.100, laureate head of Saturn right, harpa,聽PISObehind, control mark (wheel) above,聽CAEPIObelow,qbelow chin,rev. two quaestors seated left between two stalks of grain,ad frv emv ex s cin two lines in exergue,3.92g (Craw. 330/1b; RSCCalpurnia5a).

Ex. Steve Clarke Collection.

Cr330_1b.jpg.e5ca048a2995f5f505f2f4c7cd84210f.jpg

They sold it as Cr. 330/1a, but it's Cr. 330/1b with the control mark behind the head.

ATB,
Aidan.

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This is not my coin! Unfortunately...聽馃槓

330_1.jpg?maxwidth=1600&maxheight=1600

Link to the CNG Auction

Quote
DESCRIPTION
MYSIA, Cyzicus.Time of Commodus.AD 177-192. 脝 Medallion (43mm, 35.377 g).Homonoia with Smyrna. Naiv. Quintos Maximos,strategos. Struck circa AD 180-182. Wreathed and draped bust of Kore Soteira right, wearing necklace / In center, Commodus standing facing, head left, wearing military attire, holding spear and parazonium; between Tychai of Smyrna and Cyzicus standing facing each other, each holding transverse scepter and crowning emperor. Von Fritze X, Group VI, 6k; SNG BN 鈥; RPC IV.2 Online 746 corr. (rev. description); M. Price, Num. Chron. 1971, 128, no. 13, pl. 25. Dark green patina, minor pitting, smoothing, cleaning scratches. VF. Extremely Rare.

The homonoia between two cities of the Greek world was the proclamation of an "agreement" or commonality of interests, almost like the "sister-city" arrangements between modern cities. While the Leagues of Greek cities were primarily military alliances, a homonoia was a union based on political, economic and religious connections. The cities of Asia Minor preserved this tradition under the Romans, with an extensive interlinked system of alliances. The earliest coins marking these agreements appear under Domitian, but the majority come later, dating from the Severan period through the end of provincial coinage in the late 3rd century AD.

With this beautiful 43mm medallion with Commodus on the reverse with a very nice depiction and scene, I was LORRIBLY too cowardly tonight. And that annoys me a bit now - that I was too cowardly not to go even higher.

I went as high as 4,000 USD, the hammer price was 4,250 USD. But I should have gone a bit higher. If the new owner happens to be reading along here - my sincere congratulations!聽

A beautiful specimen. I should have been more courageous... 馃槥

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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