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Arrivals from this week...

Monday:
Cr. 353/1c

Cr353_1c_Obv.JPG.db2e99d539b355d2f04e072a44cfd90d.JPGCr353_1c_Rev.JPG.87b4b3469a7ee30caf3399baa9b55f60.JPG

Tuesday:
Cr. 53/2 - group 3C from Brinkmen & DebernardiCr53_2_B_Obv.JPG.2b2aec3c573ecabb9c2f174f983c5dec.JPGCr53_2_A_Rev.JPG.b90bb6b67e4e0da4cbbf53a059861c92.JPG

Today:
Augustus RIC 407 - Augustus & Agrippa reverse (just a 'phone photo' so far):original_1dfc090a-3566-43bd-8fa9-c448725ccf8a_20221123_115658.jpg.fe8d908d4636879a36e1caa5d9afbab8.jpgoriginal_5bbea9de-8b02-475d-9c81-536ef9540e06_20221123_115707.jpg.085eb6cf9498a67b388d9b648fe45d7c.jpg

Not a bad week so far 🙂

ATB,
Aidan.

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Another Faustina II denar with IVNONI REGINAE, Iuno standing

This is now the third "major" variant of four. It will be difficult to get the last one.

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Faustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bare headed and draped bust right (Beckmann type 5).
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 18.5mm, dies 6 h, 3.28g.
Ref.: RIC III 694, CRE 194 [R]

 

Here are the two other main variations and a secondary variation; diadem bust and hair tied with a band (braided band or double band of pearls (which could also be a representation of braided hair)).

 

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normal_Faustina_II_R835.jpg.232664dac720b54642f75a72e5602389.jpg

normal_Faustina_II_72.jpg.21f06f63d748ad5ac302841bc9e11095.jpg

 

Edited by shanxi
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image.png.c7233514abd72681d0e1c6819774c79a.png

 

Domitian, as Caesar, Fourrée Denarius. Imitating the Rome mint, circa AD 76. CAESAR AVG F • DOMITIANVS, laureate head to right / COS IIII, Pegasus standing to right, foreleg raised. For prototype, cf. RIC II.1 921 (Vespasian), BMCRE 193 (Vespasian) and RSC 47. 3.01g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. From the J. Greiff Collection, assembled prior to 1998.

 

My latest buy today evening at the Roma e-auction, an Fourrée Denarius and Imitating.

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The current last coin in my collection is a Septimius Severus denarius with a Neptune reverse.
Nothing fancy or rare, but I wanted a Neptune reverse and I like Septimius Severus portraits.
When noticing it in the auction (and also in hand), in my opinion the coin had an ugly patina (if this was patina)

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So I decided to clean it. The results are not 100% complete but I decided to stop because there was the risk of scratching the coin.

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(color is brighter in hand and it is not that porous as it seems)

Septimius Severus. (193-211). Rome. Denarius. 19 mm, 2.8 g. Struck 209 AD. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimius Severus right / P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, leaning on raised right leg set on rocks and holding trident in left hand. BMC 3, RSC 529, RIC 228

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Two Macedonian provincial coins (there were actually three in this order but one will make the object of a separate topic):

Pella for Hadrian:

hadrian.jpg.9334483ca0bbdcd68f3a25adfa987eba.jpg

AE27mm 7.42g orichalcum diassaria(?), minted at Pella, ca. 117-118.
OBV: [IMP CAESAR] TRA HADRIANV[S AVG COS P P]; laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder; countermark in rectangular cartouche, youth head to r.
COL IVL AVG PELL; Pan, naked, seated l. on rock, his r. hand raised to head, left arm resting on syrinx
RPC III 607, BMC 33, AMNG 30, Varbanov 3714 and 3716

This is an early emission for Hadrian at Pella and considering the specimens recorded by RPC (15 specs) it might have been a consistent issue in two denominations -- the assarion and the diassaria. The legend seems to end in COS PP, indicating the earlier title of Consul that Hadrian held as suffect consul for the second half of 108, before COS II, which starts in 118. The bust is also consistent with his early 117-118 Imperial issues in base metal. Because this is the only issue known for Hadrian at Pella, it could be possible that it was minted to mark his elevation to the title of Augustus and possibly for some time before news of his second consulship reached Macedonia. This coin was intensely circulated and then reintroduced in circulation at an ulterior date. There are other countermarked coins of this issue noted in RPC. The intense circulation is consistent with this being the single issue coined at Pella for Hadrian. The next issue of coinage at Pella is for Marcus Aurelius, also early in his reign.

Who is the bearded(?) youth on the countermark? Considering that the next issue of coinage of this city starts early in the reign of Marcus Aurelius, it could be a countermark used to keep this coinage in circulation to after 160.

 

and Amphipolis for Marcus Aurelius:

aurelius.jpg.10fe2c339f9d5e7f738f7b4895738971.jpg

AE26mm 10.42g orichalcum diassaria(?), minted at Amphipolis, ca. mid 160s to the 170s.
ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ Μ ΑΥΡ ΑΝΤΩΝEΙΝOϹ; laureate-headed bust of Marcus Aurelius wearing cuirass, r.
ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛƐΙΤΩΝ; Tyche seated, l., wearing kalathos, holding patera
RPC IV.1, 7652 (temporary); SNG Cop 106

The obverse legend naming the emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus is an earlier form of his Imperial name, being used as early as 161 on his Imperial coinage. So again an early emission, which also was struck in two denominations, but in this case it was more extensive, naming Marcus Aurelius, Verus and Faustina II (possibly Lucilla was also included in this issue RPC 7821).

The dual denomination system struck in two separate alloys probably mimics the Imperial as-dupondius and it was also used at Beroia for the Koinon of Macedonia.

Edited by seth77
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image.jpeg.9930bc86dbc6bc17ce9568ff0d97e194.jpeg

Source: https://www.biddr.com/auctions/navillenumismatics/browse?a=3118&l=3542868

Not post your latest coin, post your next coin 🙂 

I see that type at the „newest“ coins at biddr on my handy - and was so happy that will be in the next Naville auction. At the way home - I will calculate in my mind… and most importantly, how do I explain it to my wife? But one thing is for sure, I won't miss this opportunity! 

And now at home pc - I see the description- it is an PADUAN….. 😬😭😭😭

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1 hour ago, Prieure de Sion said:

image.jpeg.9930bc86dbc6bc17ce9568ff0d97e194.jpeg

Source: https://www.biddr.com/auctions/navillenumismatics/browse?a=3118&l=3542868

Not post your latest coin, post your next coin 🙂 

I see that type at the „newest“ coins at biddr on my handy - and was so happy that will be in the next Naville auction. At the way home - I will calculate in my mind… and most importantly, how do I explain it to my wife? But one thing is for sure, I won't miss this opportunity! 

And now at home pc - I see the description- it is an PADUAN….. 😬😭😭😭

 

Too bad!

Paduan was certainly an artist and must have been very familiar with the original issues. That's a fine-looking copy!

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I went shopping tour again at the Flavians and bought a Titus and Domitian.

 

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Titus Flavius Vespasianus as Imperator Titus Caesar divi Vespasiani filius Vespasianus Augustus.
Denarius of the Roman Imperial Period 80 AD; Material: Silver; Diameter: 19mm; Weight: 3.39g; Mint: Rome; Reference: RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Titus 112; Obverse: Head of Titus, laureate, right. The Inscripotion reads: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M for Imperator Titus Caesar Vespasianus Augustus, Pontifex Maximus (Imperator Titus Caesar Vespasian, Augustus, high priest); Reverse: Dolphin coiled around anchor. The Inscription reads: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P for Tribunicia Potestate Nona, Imperator Quintum Decimum, Consul Octavum, Pater Patriae (Holder of tribunician power for the ninth time, Imperator for the 15th time, consul for the eighth time, father of the nation).

@David Atherton writes: "Another in Titus' pulvinaria series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum".

 

 

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Titus Flavius Domitianus as Imperator Caesar Domitianus Augustus
Denarius of the Roman Imperial Period 82 AD; Material: Silver; Diameter: 18mm; Weight: 3.50g; Mint: Rome; Reference: RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Domitian 100; Obverse: Head of Domitian, laureate, right. The Inscripotion reads: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M for Imperator Caesar Domitianus Augustus, Pontifex Maximus (Imperator, Caesar, Domitian, Augustus, high priest); Reverse: Square seat, draped; semicircular frame with three crescents above. The Inscription reads: TR POT COS VIII P P for Tribunicia Potestate, Consul Octavum, Pater Patriae (Holder of tribunician power, consul for the eighth time, father of the nation).

@David Atherton writes: "A denarius which is part of the first precious metal issue of 82 minted at Rome and the last before the increased fineness of the denarii later that same year. The reverse is a carry over pulvinar type from Titus' reign. This is the last time this type was minted by Domitian before the overhaul of the mint".

 

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On 11/25/2022 at 7:14 PM, CPK said:

Paduan was certainly an artist and must have been very familiar with the original issues. That's a fine-looking copy!

That's right - it's beautifully done. Actually, one should try to buy this copy at auction. But the amount is almost too high for an imitation - I think I'd rather buy "real" antique coins for that money. But I admit - it is beautifully made and very nice to look at.

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Yesterday I got what I think is a beautiful Domitianus denarius. I find the Minerva in particular so beautiful in style. 

 

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Titus Flavius Domitianus as Imperator Caesar Domitianus Augustus.
Denarius of the Roman Imperial Period 87 AD; Material: Silver; Diameter: 19mm; Weight: 3.33g; Mint: Rome; Reference: RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Domitian 509; Obverse: Head of Domitian, laureate, right. The Inscription reads: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI for Imperator Caesar Domitianus Augustus Germanicus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate Sexta (Imperator, Caesar, Domitian, Augustus, conqueror of the Germans, high priest, holder of tribunician power for the sixth time); Reverse: Minerva standing left, holding thunderbolt and spear; shield at side. The Inscription reads: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P for Imperator Quartum Decimum, Consul Tertium Decimum, Censor Perpetuus, Pater Patriae (Imperator for the 14th time, consul for the 13th time, censor for life, father of the nation).

 

@David Atherton writes: "Domitian's denarius issues of 87 continued the same style and format of those from 86. From this time forward the four standard Minerva reverse types would dominate the denarii with a few minor interruptions. The mint during this period seems to have been divided up into separate officina based on reverse types according to Ian Carradice's careful die study of the issues (Coinage and Finances in the Reign of Domitian - 1983, p. 30). The officina system would continue until the end of the reign".

 

 

 

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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Won in CNG’s E-Auction 528 this morning. 
They seem to be working through a large hoard/ collection of didrachms from Kyrene. I’ve been eyeballing them for a while and finally snapped up one that checks all the boxes without breaking the bank 


2BC4F606-E028-42B6-B0DE-28EDFEB2A13F.jpeg.0b7cfb7f7c9d3290ae4605989a1f60d6.jpeg

DESCRIPTION

KYRENAICA, Kyrene. temp. Magas. Circa 294-275 BC. AR Didrachm (21.5mm, 7.51 g, 5h). Head of Zeus Karneios left / Silphion plant; monogram to upper left, star to upper right. BMC 238–41; SNG Copenhagen 1238 corr. (monogram). Lightly toned. VF. Fine style head of Zeus Karneios.

 

Edited by Nvb
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2 hours ago, Nvb said:

Won in CNG’s E-Auction 528 this morning. 
They seem to be working through a large hoard/ collection of didrachms from Kyrene. I’ve been eyeballing them for a while and finally snapped up one that checks all the boxes without breaking the bank 


2BC4F606-E028-42B6-B0DE-28EDFEB2A13F.jpeg.0b7cfb7f7c9d3290ae4605989a1f60d6.jpeg

DESCRIPTION

KYRENAICA, Kyrene. temp. Magas. Circa 294-275 BC. AR Didrachm (21.5mm, 7.51 g, 5h). Head of Zeus Karneios left / Silphion plant; monogram to upper left, star to upper right. BMC 238–41; SNG Copenhagen 1238 corr. (monogram). Lightly toned. VF. Fine style head of Zeus Karneios.

 

Ah … wonderful… like the complete coin - but the face is lovely. Gratulation! 

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An average, but IMHO nice Roman Provincial Coin of Faustina II.

normal_Faustina_II_R851.jpg.e62efcae400fdb8a9e2573d1ab33d6a6.jpg

Faustina Minor
Pautalia, Thrace, AE 21,


Obv.: ΦAVCTEINA - CEBACTH, diademed draped bust right, hair in a coil at the back

Rev.: OVΛΠIAC ΠAVTAΛIAC, Tyche-Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand


Ref.: Ruzicka Pautalia 138, RPC Online IV.1 8330, Varbanov II 4490 (R3), BMC Thrace p. 142, 12; Moushmov 4114

 

Edited by shanxi
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Only two this week...

Cr. 410/2b denarius - a headless Calliope - this coin has little wear but was badly struck.   I had 410/2a already, this variety swaps the positions of MVSA and Q. POMPONI on the reverse, so she joins the Muses collection.

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This is a C. Piso Frugi denarius, with the horseman left for a change.
Cr. 408/1b.   Dies 136 (obv.) & 167 (rev.).

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ATB,
Aidan.

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Crossed this issue of my want list a couple of weeks ago. Despite the marks on the reverse and the wear, I enjoy the details of Nero's market building.  8.6.png.88fa8e7abe7910a97c9bf5641d002871.png

In his book Monumental coins, Marvin Tameanko notes that in 59 AD, Nero dedicated a new market building on the Caelian Hill, in Rome. The Macellum of Nero was designed by his court architects, Severus and Celer, two professionals who are mentioned by Tactitus as "having the genius and audacity to attempt by art what nature had refused" referring to the dome, and the Macellum of Nero indeed shows an impressive dome. Tameanko notes that the original dome might have measured 36 meters in diameter. The market building is last heard of in the 4th century. Whether or not the church of S. Stefano Rotondo was built over the remains of the Macellum of Nero is debated. 

According to Tameanko, Rome (had) possessed at least three Macellums, market buildings. The first, burned down in 210 BC and rebuilt in 179 BC, was removed to make way for the new imperial fora. Another market building, the Macellum Liviae, was built by Augustus and dedicated by Tiberius in 7 BC, and was located on the Esquiline Hill.

The two-story market building of Nero would have contained various shops for luxury goods and foods, but also would have housed service providers such as bankers, loan brokers and other commerce businessess. Historians believe the building would have been part of a larger open structure, housing various stalls, a covered portico and animal pens.
 
Philip Hill notes (p. 40) that MAC AVG stands for MACELLUM AVGVSTI, the market of Nero (ref. Mattingly). 

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My first coin with Vespasian on one side and one of his sons on the other. I always enjoy a two-faced coin, especially one with nice portraits like these.

Vespasian AR Didrachm, Caesarea, Province of Galatia-Cappadocia, Year 9 (AD 76-77). Obv. Laureate Head of Vespasian right, [ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑ] ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΟΥЄϹΠΑϹΙΑΝΟϹ Ϲ[ЄΒΑϹΤΟϹ] / Rev. Laureate Head of Titus right, [ΑΥΤ]Ο ΚΑΙ ΟΥЄϹΠΑϹΙΑΝΟϹ ϹЄΒΑϹΤ[ΟΥ ΥΙΟϹ]. 20 mm., 7.06 g., 1 hr. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. II Online 1650 (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1650); Sydenham 102 [E. Sydenham, The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia (1933 & 1978 Supp. by A.G. Malloy)]. Purchased from Roma Numismatics Ltd E-Sale 103, 24 Nov. 2022, Lot 737.

image.jpeg.0e2e246b7c60d3ef5d8f17286d2b73a4.jpeg

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Just now, DonnaML said:

My first coin with Vespasian on one side and one of his sons on the other. I always enjoy a two-faced coin, especially one with nice portraits like these.

Vespasian AR Didrachm, Caesarea, Province of Galatia-Cappadocia, Year 9 (AD 76-77). Obv. Laureate Head of Vespasian right, [ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑ] ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΟΥЄϹΠΑϹΙΑΝΟϹ Ϲ[ЄΒΑϹΤΟϹ] / Rev. Laureate Head of Titus right, [ΑΥΤ]Ο ΚΑΙ ΟΥЄϹΠΑϹΙΑΝΟϹ ϹЄΒΑϹΤ[ΟΥ ΥΙΟϹ]. 20 mm., 7.06 g., 1 hr. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. II Online 1650 (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1650); Sydenham 102 [E. Sydenham, The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia (1933 & 1978 Supp. by A.G. Malloy)]. Purchased from Roma Numismatics Ltd E-Sale 103, 24 Nov. 2022, Lot 737.

image.jpeg.0e2e246b7c60d3ef5d8f17286d2b73a4.jpeg

Very attractive coin, with excellent portraits!

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4 hours ago, DonnaML said:

My first coin with Vespasian on one side and one of his sons on the other. I always enjoy a two-faced coin, especially one with nice portraits like these.

Vespasian AR Didrachm, Caesarea, Province of Galatia-Cappadocia, Year 9 (AD 76-77). Obv. Laureate Head of Vespasian right, [ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑ] ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΟΥЄϹΠΑϹΙΑΝΟϹ Ϲ[ЄΒΑϹΤΟϹ] / Rev. Laureate Head of Titus right, [ΑΥΤ]Ο ΚΑΙ ΟΥЄϹΠΑϹΙΑΝΟϹ ϹЄΒΑϹΤ[ΟΥ ΥΙΟϹ]. 20 mm., 7.06 g., 1 hr. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. II Online 1650 (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1650); Sydenham 102 [E. Sydenham, The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia (1933 & 1978 Supp. by A.G. Malloy)]. Purchased from Roma Numismatics Ltd E-Sale 103, 24 Nov. 2022, Lot 737.

image.jpeg.0e2e246b7c60d3ef5d8f17286d2b73a4.jpeg

Ah you got it 😉 Gratulation. 
 

The coin also caught my eye. Wanted to bid on it first - but I already had others in the Target. Nevertheless, this specimen has caught my eye. Very beautiful.

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Today was an unexpectedly successful day with many winning tickets. But I don't want to put them all here. I would like to briefly introduce two - which I find quite interesting.


The first is an antique imitation of Domitianus - my second with it. It is supposed to be an imitation of RIC 188. Unfortunately, I have not found any pictures at Numista, nor at Online OCRE. And oh wonder - on @David Atherton Flavier website RIC 188 is not available either! David - this is the first RIC type that I have not found on your website.

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces251618.html
http://numismatics.org/ocre/id/ric.2_1(2).dom.188 
https://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/index.php?cat=11162 

Then I found a real specimen at acsearch:
https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3350064 

Here now is the ancient contemporary imitation and forgery:

image.png.fb8cfbc420d58eee6d6057c343cfecb4.png

Domitianus, 81-96. Denarius (Subaeratus, 19 mm, 2.89 g, 12 h), a contemporary imitation plated. Irregular mint, after 84. IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC Laureate and draped bust of Domitianus to left. Rev. P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P Minerva standing front, head to left, holding thunderbolt in her right hand and spear in her left; behind her, shield set on the ground. Cf. RIC 188 (for prototype). An attractive contemporary plated imitation of a very rare type. 

From the collection of Dr. D. Löer, formed since the 1970s, privately acquired from Frank S. Robinson (with original dealer's ticket).

 

 

And then, somewhat surprisingly, this sestertius of Marcus Aurelius was added, which I had completely forgotten about. I had only made my basic bid - and then completely forgotten about it. I think it's quite nice and I like big bronzes.

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Marcus Aurelius, 161-180. Sestertius (Orichalcum, 33 mm, 24.42 g, 5 h), Rome, 163. IMP CAES M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG P M Laureate head of Marcus Aurelius to right. Rev. SALVTI AVGVSTOR TR P XVII / COS III / S - C Salus standing front, head to left, feeding serpent rising from altar out of patera with her right hand and holding short scepter in her left. BMC 1038. Cohen 564. RIC 843. Smoothed and repatinated, otherwise, about extremely fine. Privately acquired from R. Kaiser in 1990 (with original dealer's ticket).

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3 hours ago, Prieure de Sion said:

And oh wonder - on @David Atherton Flavier website RIC 188 is not available either! David - this is the first RIC type that I have not found on your website. 

It's a tough one to track down. The closest I have is the Minerva on prow (M2) with the left facing draped bust.

What are the odds that a forger would imitate such a rare coin?!

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3 minutes ago, David Atherton said:

What are the odds that a forger would imitate such a rare coin?!

Could be that the type (RIC 188) was not as rare in antiquity as it is today. Maybe the forger got exactly this type by chance and had no other templates. 

Next to the village was a fort, there came pay for the legionaries, almost all silver coins consisted of a fresh minting of this type. The soldiers brought these coins to the village. The counterfeiters got their hands on the coin. Oh the imagination runs away with me ... 
 

😄 

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bpv_776864.jpg

 

Domitian, Didrachm, Caesarea Cappadocia, BMC.29  - Aulock6373  - Syd.124  - RPC.2/1669  - MC.169
Source: https://www.cgb.fr/domitien-didrachme-sup,bpv_776864,a.html 

This is NOT my coin - unfortunately. I wanted to have it so much. Did one of you outbid me? I went up to 1.100 euros and then my courage left me - the other bidder had offered 1.161 euros and I would have had to bid over 1.200 euros in the next step - and I was too cowardly. If any of you have bought it - congratulations!

@David Atherton please tell me that I did well not to increase the bid to 1.200 Euro. Please tell me I did the right thing. If you now tell me that one could have gone higher - my day is spoiled... 😂😂😂

 

 

brm_774383.jpg

 

Domitian, Denarius, Rome, C.390  - RIC.49  - BMC/RE.88  - RSC.390  - RCV.2675 (440$) - MRK.-  - BN/R.73

 

This IS my coin 😄 ... at least I got a consolation prize - this nice little coin of Domitianus. I'll have to see what David writes about it. I like the patina. A small consolation today. I wish I had kept bidding on the coin from Caesarea... 😭

 

 

 

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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14 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

@David Atherton please tell me that I did well not to increase the bid to 1.200 Euro. Please tell me I did the right thing. If you now tell me that one could have gone higher - my day is spoiled... 😂😂😂

 

If it's any consolation, I wouldn't have bid any higher. A great example, but IMHO, hammered a bit high!

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