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AJ's Top Ten of 2022


AncientJoe
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2022 has proven to be a remarkably busy year for me and one where acquiring coins proved to be difficult, given the emergence of a few new very well-heeled buyers. They've more than made up for a few exited/paused collectors: there always seems to be a new buyer sweeping up the lion's share of the big auctions.

Despite this, I did have a good year for new additions, although it ended up being focused unintentionally on upgrading rather than many net-new additions: six of my top ten are types I've owned before. Unlike recent years, none of these coins have made my own (subjective and fluid) overall Top Ten list but they have added breadth to my deliberately small collection.

This year also marks ten years of solely focusing on collecting ancient coins. I collected US and World coinage for the a while prior to this period but I mark the acquisition of my Antoninus Pius avatar as when the "ancient bug" bit me. Time permitting, I'm planning to post a "Top Ten of Ten Years" thread soon as well.

But for now, this year's list, starting with the upgrades:


Claudius IMPER RECEPT aureus: 

Claudius. AD 41-54. AV Aureus (19mm, 7.65 g, 1h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck AD 44-45. TI CLAVD • CAESAR • AVG • P • M • TR • P • IIII, laureate head right / IMPER RECEPT across top of front wall, view of the praetorian camp; in front is a wall with two small arched openings below and five battlements on top; above and behind it stands a soldier on guard left, holding a spear in right hand; to his right, an aquila; behind him is a pediment, in which is a crescent, on two pillars, flanked left and right by walls, each with a battlement above and an arch below. RIC I 25 (Rome); von Kaenel Type 21, – (unlisted dies); Lyon 40 (unlisted dies); Calicó 361b; BMCRE 23 (Rome); BN 43-4; Biaggi 206

Ex Heath Collection, Triton XXII, January 8-9, 2019, lot 1006; LHS 100, April 23-24, 2007, lot 466; Gerhard Hirsch 3, 1954, lot 224; Münzhandlung Basel 8, March 22, 1937, lot 575 (there purchased by Cahn)

image.jpeg.97ad45f148500a7fe9e51079b471e078.jpeg


I'm very grateful to a good friend for being willing to sell this coin. He's a pedigree hound and bought it with virtually no pedigree, connecting the dots to the 1937 catalog. I've owned an example of the type before but never successfully tracked a pedigree myself and wasn't as happy with the condition: this is an upgrade in condition, style, and pedigree and certainly a "keeper" for me.


Nero Colossus aureus:

NERO. 54-68, aureus. 64-68. NERO CAESAR Laureate head r. Rev: AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS Nero standing facing, dressed in toga and wearing radiant crown. He is holding a branch and a victoria on a globe. C. 44. RIC 46. Calico 402. 7.34g, St. 6h. High relief. Ex. Boscoreale Hoard 1895; Ex. H. P. Smith Esq Sotheby Wilkinson & Hodge, June 5 1905, lot 405; Ex. Sotheby Wilkinson & Hodge, December 6, 1907 lot 111; Ex. Dr Eugen Merzbacher Munchen, November 2, 1909, lot 1204; Ex. Dr Jacob Hirsch Auction 33, November 17, 1913, lot 1144; Ex. Robert Ball Nachf Auction 6, February 9, 1932, lot 1037; Ex UBS 72, 2007, lot no. 209

 image.jpeg.5920b8a72d214040d26b044b4aa4ad43.jpeg

This coin is also an upgrade - it's the third example of the type I've owned but by far the nicest. The auction picture showed a bit of toning which I thought could be Boscoreale. With the help of some catalog sleuthing and Ex-Numis, I'm able to confidently state it is indeed Boscoreale and has a lengthy ownership history in the intervening years as well.

 

Antoninus Pius Liberalitas aureus:


Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. AV Aureus (20mm, 7.15 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 147. ANTONINVS AVG PI VS P P TR P COS IIII, laureate head right / LIB IIII in exergue, Antoninus Pius, togate, seated left on curule chair on platform, extending right hand and holding volumen in left; to left, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand and cornucopia in left; on ground to left, citizen, togate, standing right, holding out fold of toga with both hands to receive distribution. RIC III 141c; Strack 149δ; Calicó 1571; BMCRE 546 note; Biaggi 739 var. (bust type); Jameson 115 var. (break in obv. legend); Mazzini 496 var. (bust type). Toned with underlying luster. EF.

Ex Arthur Bally-Herzog Collection (Münzen und Medaillen AG 93, 16 December 2003), lot 170, purchased from Spink & Son, 3 March 1905 (for 200 francs); A. Bain Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, July 11th, 1901), lot 33.

image.jpeg.8eff780c3558ec364a062d809a863b77.jpeg

 

Another upgrade and again the third example of the type I've owned. This coin has a more refined style, nicely detailed reverse strike, and an early pedigree.

Carthage Trihemistater

Zeugitania, Carthage. AU Trihemistater; Zeugitania, Carthage; c. 264-260 BC, Trihemistater, 12.49g. Jenkins and Lewis-Group IX, 396 (this coin). Obv: Head of Tanit l., wearing wreath of grain ears, triple pendant earring, and necklace with hanging pendants. Rx: Rev. Unbridled horse standing r. on exergual line, head turned back. Ex Catherine E. Bullowa/Coinhunter, with original ticket. Ex R. B. Lewis Collection. Ex 1948 Tunis Hoard (ICGH 2271)

image.jpeg.ea8c8e3c6b2a410c540080e164b266e0.jpeg

And another upgrade: this coin is notable for its minimal amount of die rust, something which bothered me about my previous example. It being a plate coin in an important work adds further appeal, and the reverse style of the horse is dramatic and well executed.


Acanthus tetradrachm:

Tetradrachm (Silver, 14.28 g 2), c. 370. Bull, with head raised, collapsing to left, attacked by lion leaping on his back to right; in exergue, ΑΛΕΞΙΟΣ. Rev. ΑΚΑ-Ν-ΘΙ-ΟΝ around quadripartite square with raised fields; all within incuse square. Desneux 147-148 (same obverse die). Gulbenkian 397

image.jpeg.5c2d34cd974f7b0244fa48cd98fc1a70.jpeg

This is an upgrade in style and pedigree (my previous example was from the recent group that's been percolating out for the last few years). Although I haven't yet been able to track down a pedigree for it, I know it's from a well-known collector who bought his coins in the early 90s... it'll just be a matter of time/catalog sleuthing.

 

Cilicia trihemiobol

UNCERTAIN MINTS. Trihemiobol (?), 4th c. BC. AR 0.99 g. Janiform head, bearded male head on the l., female head r. Rev. Three faced bearded male head. SNG Levante 201 ­ 202

image.jpeg.335e7c469b4a3c17c46da4666b02ac8d.jpeg

 

And one final upgrade for this year, a small yet artistically remarkable trihemiobol from Cilicia. This is listed "from an old Swiss collection started in the 19th century" which is almost meaningless but the toning indicates it should have a pedigree... alas, not one I've tracked down yet. But, the metal quality and style are both drastically better than my previous example so I'm very happy with the coin.


And the net-new types:

Maximian "Hercules fighting Hydra" aureus:

Maximian Hercules 286-310. Aureus 293-294, Rome. MAXIMIA-NVS PF AVG Laureate head of Maximian right / HER-CVLI D-EBELLAT Hercules standing left knocking out the hydra with his club; in the epigraph, PR. 5.30g. c.253-; RIC-; Depeyrot 6/13; Calico 4659a (this coin)

image.jpeg.879aca9b9901ac3b71128cea3c1a9819.jpeg


I was very disappointed to underbid this exact coin last year (after wanting to bid on it the year prior). I was shocked to find it in a dealer's case at the ANA show and managed to buy it for less than the hammer price of my bid would have been... evidently it was reserved and didn't sell. Auction records can be deceiving but I'm very glad to have the coin in the end!

Caligula Three Sisters sestertius:

Æ-Sestertius, 37/38, Rome; 26.52g C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT head l. with laurel wreath//AGRIPPINA-DRVSILLA-IVLIA Agrippina, Drusilla and Julia stand as Securitas, Concordia and Fortuna vv BMC 36; coh 4; RIC² 33.

image.jpeg.f33c12cd225beb993b7094fba50bd0b7.jpeg

 

I've wanted a Caligula Three Sisters sestertius for years and had not found the right balance of detail and lack of tooling/smoothing. This coin satisfied that for me, validated by an in-hand assessment from a trusted dealer (buying bronze from an image is inadvisable).


Hadrian Africae aureus:

Hadrian. Aureus; Hadrian; 117-138 AD, Rome, c. 130-3 AD, Aureus, 7.26g. RIC-1554 (R), pl. 34 (same dies); Calicó-1170 (same dies); BMC-786 note (citing Vienna); bust var. of C-8 (150 Fr.). Obv: HADRIANVS - AVG COS III P P Bare-headed, draped bust l. Rx: ADVENTVI - AVG - AFRICAE Hadrian raising r. hand in greeting stands r. before tripod altar at which Africa sacrifices from patera, she wears drapery to feet and an elephant-skin headdress and also holds two wheat stalks in l. arm, a sacrificial bull emerges from behind her and falls towards altar.
Ex: Michael F Price Collection, Stacks Dec 3rd, 1996, lot 175; Stacks Fixed Price List, 1990, Lot 25; Ex. Enrico Caruso Collection, Canessa sale June 28, 1923, lot 298

image.jpeg.efe0b53688350399da052f1ea24d18fd.jpeg

I purchased this coin from HJB for the portrait and rare travel type and was pleasantly surprised to find a meaningful pedigree myself and to then be contacted by Aaron Berk to inform me that one of his customers found that it was Ex. Enrico Caruso! Thank you, Aaron and the helpful collector!


Kyrene Tetrobol:

CYRENAIC, CYRENE, AV Tetrobol, 308-305 BC. J.-C. D/ Rider riding in step to the left, the petasus in the back. A d., a star. R/ Silphion plant. A d.,  (Sosis). Naville 160; SNG Cop. 1232. 2.84g; Ex. Jean Elsen & Sons sale 87, March 11, 2006, 1252; Ex Leu 36, May 7, 1985, 222; Ex Leu 25, April 23, 1980, 200

image.jpeg.d14ee016ccb04161093f9eb0f5ead949.jpeg

This coin has deep luster and an attractive rider but the notable side is the silphium on the reverse. I have another Kyrene stater but haven't owned any coin depicting silphium yet: it's a "must have" for my collection for its historical significance and, while small, this coin has one of the more artistic renderings of the plant.

 

Thanks for reading and let me know your favorites or which ones jump out to you!

I've enjoyed everyone else's Top Ten lists so far - looking forward to seeing more - and here's to a healthy and successful 2023 for all of us!

Edited by AncientJoe
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Awesome show of coins Joe. My favourite is your gold Kyrene tetrobol. I tried bidding on one of these last year, but it went to high. Saw another in NAC last auction, but just didn't love it. Ended up purchasing an archaic hemidrachm from Nomos last major auction with a heart shaped silphium seed instead. Really wanted a coin from Kyrene in my collection. Anyway, your piece is extremely attractive and a clearly important coin.

Next would be your Carthage trihemistater. I remember your previous example and loved that. This piece is just incredible. Now I think about it, maybe this is my favourite!!

I'm biased towards Greek, so the Acanthus tetradrachm would be third. Though I love the Roman coins too without knowing a lot about them.

Congratulations on what you've achieved this year, it's always exciting to see your list.

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I'm glad I posted my top of the year before : I wouldn't dare anymore now !!

As always, I can't but admire the exquisite taste and knowledge you show at finding exceptional coins year after year. It's a great honour to be given the opportunity to seeing them. Thank you so much Joe

Q

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58 minutes ago, Qcumbor said:

I'm glad I posted my top of the year before : I wouldn't dare anymore now !!

A sentiment no doubt shared by the second sad Batman in my contribution to Roman Collector's "Memes with Ancient Coin Themes" back in June...reposted here:

2_AfterAncientJoe.jpg.b8a70fcdb330ff14cc

 

Edited by Kamnaskires
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😮 Any one of those coins could be a lifetime acquisition!

It's almost impossible to pick a favorite, but I really like that Claudius. Nero and the Caligula 3 Sisters maybe come next. But they are all unbelievably fine coins!

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Wow. Definitely the top Top Ten list posted here this year -- no surprise! I love each and every one of them. But, as much as I'd hate to leave off the Carthage AV Trihemistater or the Kyrene AV Tetraobolus, if I had to pick my personal favorites, they would have to be your five Roman Imperial aurei -- Claudius I, Nero, Antoninus Pius, Hadrian, and Maximian. With a special shout-out to the ADVENTVI AVG AFRICAE reverse design on the Hadrian. Not one found on the silver and bronze Travel Series coins as far as I know. 

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Top marks to all of your acquisitions!  I'm especially partial (of course) to your Nero and Hadrian -- the Nero was quite a find and is a tribute to your persistence for both a better example as well as a Boscoreale coin.  You couldn't have done better!

Plus, really, the Kyrene tetrobol silphium reverse is just cool and goes to show that good things do come in small packages!

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Might as well rename this thread to "NumisForums Overall Top 10 Coins 2022". 🙂

Absolutely stunning coins. I'm not as into Roman, but I was drooling over most of them. The "Three Sisters" coin is actually on my "dream list" but it's probably the least amazing of the coins here.

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7 hours ago, AncientJoe said:

2022 has proven to be a remarkably busy year for me and one where acquiring coins proved to be difficult, given the emergence of a few new very well-heeled buyers. They've more than made up for a few exited/paused collectors: there always seems to be a new buyer sweeping up the lion's share of the big auctions.

Despite this, I did have a good year for new additions, although it ended up being focused unintentionally on upgrading rather than many net-new additions: six of my top ten are types I've owned before. Unlike recent years, none of these coins have made my own (subjective and fluid) overall Top Ten list but they have added breadth to my deliberately small collection.

This year also marks ten years of solely focusing on collecting ancient coins. I collected US and World coinage for the a while prior to this period but I mark the acquisition of my Antoninus Pius avatar as when the "ancient bug" bit me. Time permitting, I'm planning to post a "Top Ten of Ten Years" thread soon as well.

But for now, this year's list, starting with the upgrades:


Claudius IMPER RECEPT aureus: 

Claudius. AD 41-54. AV Aureus (19mm, 7.65 g, 1h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck AD 44-45. TI CLAVD • CAESAR • AVG • P • M • TR • P • IIII, laureate head right / IMPER RECEPT across top of front wall, view of the praetorian camp; in front is a wall with two small arched openings below and five battlements on top; above and behind it stands a soldier on guard left, holding a spear in right hand; to his right, an aquila; behind him is a pediment, in which is a crescent, on two pillars, flanked left and right by walls, each with a battlement above and an arch below. RIC I 25 (Rome); von Kaenel Type 21, – (unlisted dies); Lyon 40 (unlisted dies); Calicó 361b; BMCRE 23 (Rome); BN 43-4; Biaggi 206

Ex Heath Collection, Triton XXII, January 8-9, 2019, lot 1006; LHS 100, April 23-24, 2007, lot 466; Gerhard Hirsch 3, 1954, lot 224; Münzhandlung Basel 8, March 22, 1937, lot 575 (there purchased by Cahn)

image.jpeg.97ad45f148500a7fe9e51079b471e078.jpeg


I'm very grateful to a good friend for being willing to sell this coin. He's a pedigree hound and bought it with virtually no pedigree, connecting the dots to the 1937 catalog. I've owned an example of the type before but never successfully tracked a pedigree myself and wasn't as happy with the condition: this is an upgrade in condition, style, and pedigree and certainly a "keeper" for me.


Nero Colossus aureus:

NERO. 54-68, aureus. 64-68. NERO CAESAR Laureate head r. Rev: AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS Nero standing facing, dressed in toga and wearing radiant crown. He is holding a branch and a victoria on a globe. C. 44. RIC 46. Calico 402. 7.34g, St. 6h. High relief. Ex. Boscoreale Hoard 1895; Ex. H. P. Smith Esq Sotheby Wilkinson & Hodge, June 5 1905, lot 405; Ex. Sotheby Wilkinson & Hodge, December 6, 1907 lot 111; Ex. Dr Eugen Merzbacher Munchen, November 2, 1909, lot 1204; Ex. Dr Jacob Hirsch Auction 33, November 17, 1913, lot 1144; Ex. Robert Ball Nachf Auction 6, February 9, 1932, lot 1037; Ex UBS 72, 2007, lot no. 209

 image.jpeg.5920b8a72d214040d26b044b4aa4ad43.jpeg

This coin is also an upgrade - it's the third example of the type I've owned but by far the nicest. The auction picture showed a bit of toning which I thought could be Boscoreale. With the help of some catalog sleuthing and Ex-Numis, I'm able to confidently state it is indeed Boscoreale and has a lengthy ownership history in the intervening years as well.

 

Antoninus Pius Liberalitas aureus:


Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. AV Aureus (20mm, 7.15 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 147. ANTONINVS AVG PI VS P P TR P COS IIII, laureate head right / LIB IIII in exergue, Antoninus Pius, togate, seated left on curule chair on platform, extending right hand and holding volumen in left; to left, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand and cornucopia in left; on ground to left, citizen, togate, standing right, holding out fold of toga with both hands to receive distribution. RIC III 141c; Strack 149δ; Calicó 1571; BMCRE 546 note; Biaggi 739 var. (bust type); Jameson 115 var. (break in obv. legend); Mazzini 496 var. (bust type). Toned with underlying luster. EF.

Ex Arthur Bally-Herzog Collection (Münzen und Medaillen AG 93, 16 December 2003), lot 170, purchased from Spink & Son, 3 March 1905 (for 200 francs); A. Bain Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, July 11th, 1901), lot 33.

image.jpeg.8eff780c3558ec364a062d809a863b77.jpeg

 

Another upgrade and again the third example of the type I've owned. This coin has a more refined style, nicely detailed reverse strike, and an early pedigree.

Carthage Trihemistater

Zeugitania, Carthage. AU Trihemistater; Zeugitania, Carthage; c. 264-260 BC, Trihemistater, 12.49g. Jenkins and Lewis-Group IX, 396 (this coin). Obv: Head of Tanit l., wearing wreath of grain ears, triple pendant earring, and necklace with hanging pendants. Rx: Rev. Unbridled horse standing r. on exergual line, head turned back. Ex Catherine E. Bullowa/Coinhunter, with original ticket. Ex R. B. Lewis Collection. Ex 1948 Tunis Hoard (ICGH 2271)

image.jpeg.ea8c8e3c6b2a410c540080e164b266e0.jpeg

And another upgrade: this coin is notable for its minimal amount of die rust, something which bothered me about my previous example. It being a plate coin in an important work adds further appeal, and the reverse style of the horse is dramatic and well executed.


Acanthus tetradrachm:

Tetradrachm (Silver, 14.28 g 2), c. 370. Bull, with head raised, collapsing to left, attacked by lion leaping on his back to right; in exergue, ΑΛΕΞΙΟΣ. Rev. ΑΚΑ-Ν-ΘΙ-ΟΝ around quadripartite square with raised fields; all within incuse square. Desneux 147-148 (same obverse die). Gulbenkian 397

image.jpeg.5c2d34cd974f7b0244fa48cd98fc1a70.jpeg

This is an upgrade in style and pedigree (my previous example was from the recent group that's been percolating out for the last few years). Although I haven't yet been able to track down a pedigree for it, I know it's from a well-known collector who bought his coins in the early 90s... it'll just be a matter of time/catalog sleuthing.

 

Cilicia trihemiobol

UNCERTAIN MINTS. Trihemiobol (?), 4th c. BC. AR 0.99 g. Janiform head, bearded male head on the l., female head r. Rev. Three faced bearded male head. SNG Levante 201 ­ 202

image.jpeg.335e7c469b4a3c17c46da4666b02ac8d.jpeg

 

And one final upgrade for this year, a small yet artistically remarkable trihemiobol from Cilicia. This is listed "from an old Swiss collection started in the 19th century" which is almost meaningless but the toning indicates it should have a pedigree... alas, not one I've tracked down yet. But, the metal quality and style are both drastically better than my previous example so I'm very happy with the coin.


And the net-new types:

Maximian "Hercules fighting Hydra" aureus:

Maximian Hercules 286-310. Aureus 293-294, Rome. MAXIMIA-NVS PF AVG Laureate head of Maximian right / HER-CVLI D-EBELLAT Hercules standing left knocking out the hydra with his club; in the epigraph, PR. 5.30g. c.253-; RIC-; Depeyrot 6/13; Calico 4659a (this coin)

image.jpeg.879aca9b9901ac3b71128cea3c1a9819.jpeg


I was very disappointed to underbid this exact coin last year (after wanting to bid on it the year prior). I was shocked to find it in a dealer's case at the ANA show and managed to buy it for less than the hammer price of my bid would have been... evidently it was reserved and didn't sell. Auction records can be deceiving but I'm very glad to have the coin in the end!

Caligula Three Sisters sestertius:

Æ-Sestertius, 37/38, Rome; 26.52g C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT head l. with laurel wreath//AGRIPPINA-DRVSILLA-IVLIA Agrippina, Drusilla and Julia stand as Securitas, Concordia and Fortuna vv BMC 36; coh 4; RIC² 33.

image.jpeg.f33c12cd225beb993b7094fba50bd0b7.jpeg

 

I've wanted a Caligula Three Sisters sestertius for years and had not found the right balance of detail and lack of tooling/smoothing. This coin satisfied that for me, validated by an in-hand assessment from a trusted dealer (buying bronze from an image is inadvisable).


Hadrian Africae aureus:

Hadrian. Aureus; Hadrian; 117-138 AD, Rome, c. 130-3 AD, Aureus, 7.26g. RIC-1554 (R), pl. 34 (same dies); Calicó-1170 (same dies); BMC-786 note (citing Vienna); bust var. of C-8 (150 Fr.). Obv: HADRIANVS - AVG COS III P P Bare-headed, draped bust l. Rx: ADVENTVI - AVG - AFRICAE Hadrian raising r. hand in greeting stands r. before tripod altar at which Africa sacrifices from patera, she wears drapery to feet and an elephant-skin headdress and also holds two wheat stalks in l. arm, a sacrificial bull emerges from behind her and falls towards altar.
Ex: Michael F Price Collection, Stacks Dec 3rd, 1996, lot 175; Stacks Fixed Price List, 1990, Lot 25; Ex. Enrico Caruso Collection, Canessa sale June 28, 1923, lot 298

image.jpeg.efe0b53688350399da052f1ea24d18fd.jpeg

I purchased this coin from HJB for the portrait and rare travel type and was pleasantly surprised to find a meaningful pedigree myself and to then be contacted by Aaron Berk to inform me that one of his customers found that it was Ex. Enrico Caruso! Thank you, Aaron and the helpful collector!


Kyrene Tetrobol:

CYRENAIC, CYRENE, AV Tetrobol, 308-305 BC. J.-C. D/ Rider riding in step to the left, the petasus in the back. A d., a star. R/ Silphion plant. A d.,  (Sosis). Naville 160; SNG Cop. 1232. 2.84g; Ex. Jean Elsen & Sons sale 87, March 11, 2006, 1252; Ex Leu 36, May 7, 1985, 222; Ex Leu 25, April 23, 1980, 200

image.jpeg.d14ee016ccb04161093f9eb0f5ead949.jpeg

This coin has deep luster and an attractive rider but the notable side is the silphium on the reverse. I have another Kyrene stater but haven't owned any coin depicting silphium yet: it's a "must have" for my collection for its historical significance and, while small, this coin has one of the more artistic renderings of the plant.

 

Thanks for reading and let me know your favorites or which ones jump out to you!

I've enjoyed everyone else's Top Ten lists so far - looking forward to seeing more - and here's to a healthy and successful 2023 for all of us!

A.J. Congrats on another sensational year 😊! One coin that seized my attention was the Carthaginian gold coin with Tanit & the horse 😮. I think this coin represents the apogee of Carthaginian die engraving, it doesn't get any better. This coin seems more like a medal than a coin. The image of Tanit now appears Punic instead the typical Sicilian Arethusa image. What really enhances the beauty of this coin is the absence of distracting inscriptions. So much is said without words. The Hadrian aureus has a wonderful portrait & excellent reverse composition. 

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Stunning, absolutely stunning coins!  It's hard to pick a favorite; all are museum quality.  Of the gold, I'd pick the Claudius aureus, but really its a "dead heat" with the other gold coins (the Kyrene Tetrobol is exquisite!).  Between the two silver coins, I'd chose the Acanthus tetradrachm, but again I think both are meritorious coins.  The Caligula sestertius is one of the best that I have ever seen.

Congratulations!

Edited by robinjojo
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Spectacular as usual, AJ.  Wow!

Impossible to pick a favorite with a group like that, but I suppose my favorite is probably the Hadrian/Africa aureus…just an incredible portrait and reverse design.  I also love that amazing A Pius portrait, the Hercules/hydra reverse, and the Acanthus tet.
 

Truly wonderful group, congrats on another great year!

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