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King Edward VIII


Topcat7
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@DonnaML (On another thread you asked "EDWARD VIII"?)

As we all know, King Edward VIII abdicated (before his Coronation) so that he could marry an American divorcee who went by the name of Mrs Wallace Simpson. (Didn't we do this all too recently with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle?)

Anyway, to the best of my (limited) knowledge the UK did not release into circulation any coins that bore King Edward VIII's name, however, some British dependencies did.

One of those was British West Africa, and together with a Commemorative (Coronation) Medallion (not a coin) of King Edward VIII, I have posted the coin that I have, here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magical_Snap_-_2022.08.23_11.48_-_051-removebg-preview.png

Ref: KM#16

Magical Snap - 2022.08.23 11.50 - 052.jpg

Edited by Topcat7
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This is the East Africa version.

Edward VIII East Africa Ten Cents, 1936-Himage.png.d51cdefe4226c67f7540f1ccc28d9003.pngHeaton's Mint, Birmingham. Bronze, 30.6mm, 11.19g. Central hole divides crown and denomination; EDWARDVS VIII REX ET IND:IMP: / TEN CENTS / KN (engraver). Curved tusks flank the centre hole; EAST AFRICA 10. Edge: Smooth (KM 24). Edward VIII abdicated before any coins were struck of him in Britain, but some exist for overseas territories.

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3 minutes ago, Furryfrog02 said:

These are cool. 
I didn't know that there were any coins minted for Edward VIII. 
Now I have something else to look for!

Not very expensive either. Unlike the British patterns, which were never put into mass production.

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Just now, John Conduitt said:

Not very expensive either. Unlike the British patterns, which were never put into mass production.

I like inexpensive 🙂
Next time I go to a show with some world bins, I will have to check more closely. I've seen George VI East Africa and some other Edward VII but since I saw "Edward" I never thought to check for a VIII. 

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Edward VIII broke with a tradition that went back to Henry VIII(1485-1509) by having his portrait facing to the left whereas George V's portrait also faced to the left.  In essence the portrait had to face the opposite of the previous monarch.  The new coins in Britain would only be released in the following year, ie 1937 but Edward VIII had abdicated in December 1936.  The British possessions such as West Africa, and Fiji etc were not bound by tradition or having to prepare portraits etc - just legends on the coin without a portrait.  Curiously Kutch was an Indian Princely State that also issued coinage in the name of Edward VIII but in their language.

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Posted (edited)

Topcat7 => congrats on snagging that cool OP-coin

 

Ummm, I don't have any coins of Horny Eddie, but I do have this sweet $5 Bank-note from 1935 ... 

=> here is the "Future King Edward VIII" ... poor horny bastard

zzzzz20.jpg

Edited by Steve
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49 minutes ago, Steve said:

Topcat7 => congrats on snagging that cool OP-coin

 

Ummm, I don't have any coins of Horny Eddie, but I do have this sweet $5 Bank-note from 1935 ... 

=> here is the "Future King Edward VIII" ... poor horny bastard

zzzzz20.jpg

And it is the scarcer French variety.  The same 1935 series also had then Princess Elizabeth on the $20 - she was only 9 years old - so she has been on money for 87 years!

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2 hours ago, UkrainiiVityaz said:

Edward VIII broke with a tradition that went back to Henry VIII(1485-1509) by having his portrait facing to the left whereas George V's portrait also faced to the left.  In essence the portrait had to face the opposite of the previous monarch. 

I believe this tradition only went back to William III (1689-1702).

Henry VIII: front or right.

Edward VI: front or right.

Mary: left (but Philip right, facing her).

Elizabeth: left.

James I: right, or left on laurel denominations.

Charles I: left.

(Cromwell: left).

Charles II: left or right.

James II: left, or right on tin farthings and halfpennies.

William III and Mary II: right.

William III: right.

Anne: left.

The 6 Georges, William IV, Victoria, Edward VII and Elizabeth II all then follow correctly, on the assumption that Edward VIII would have also followed had he had any coins circulated.

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Posted (edited)

UkrainiiVityaz =>   "And it is the scarcer French variety.  The same 1935 series also had then Princess Elizabeth on the $20 - she was only 9 years old - so she has been on money for 87 years!"

 

I have Princess Liz as well ... very cool bank-note (pink)

zzzzz24.jpg

Edited by Steve
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Posted (edited)

I kinda like her portrait on this classic 1954 series ... man, I wish I had a Devil's Face $1000, but I only have this lil' beauty ... 

 

zzzzz26.jpg

... sorry, now I'm just showin' off!! (my bad ... but I absolutely "love" these sweet ol' paper-notes ... they're kinda like geek-collector artwork, right?)

 

Cheers, coiners!! (oh, and paper-boyz!)

😉

 

Ooops, sorry Topcat7 ... apparently I derailed your cool Edward VIII thread (yah sorry ... I tend to do that from time to time to time to time)

Edited by Steve
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Posted (edited)

I have no coins of Edward VIII as far as I know, but in addition to a couple of inexpensive bronze and tin medals issued for his anticipated coronation and an AR abdication medal issued by Pinches (which I need to photograph), here is the official medal issued in 1911 for his Investiture as Prince of Wales:

Great Britain, AR Official Medal for Investiture of Prince of Wales [the future Edward VIII], 1911, by W. Goscombe John, in red leather case of issue. Obv. Bust three-quarters l., crowned and draped, CARNARVON IVLY. XIII MCMXI across the field; INVESTITURE OF EDWARD PRINCE OF WALES. K.G. / Rev. Caernarvon Castle; the Welsh dragon, below; GORPHENAF MCMXI above, on a radiate sky decorated with the Prince's crest within Garter, crowned; ARWISGIAD. IORWERTH TYWYSOG. CYMRU. M.G. 35 mm., 22.5 g. Eimer 1925 & Pl. 214, BHM 4079. Purchased from Karl Stephens, Inc., Oct. 13, 1999.

image.jpeg.6f552288217ab4cbfb57bea65216efaf.jpeg

(I don't know why it has the bluish toning, but it's been that way since I bought it.)

The case of issue:

image.jpeg.5d97db0743d2b8edb36481d548b65328.jpeg

image.jpeg.c7b5bf214924af7d85c1b8cf260654a2.jpeg

Edited by DonnaML
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