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Posted (edited)

Four coins showed up in the mail today, hope I identified correctly in the next 4 posts. 

1714623671_14.00AntoninianusofProbusA.jpg.b9e0960753fca94a58d3760f58f10203.jpg

1636147816_14.00AntoninianusofProbusB.jpg.e70d5eb0408dad9c9cd95360421818cb.jpg

 

Antoninianus of Probus, Clementia Type. Natural Desert Patina.
Ancient Coins - Antoninianus of Probus, Clementia Type. Natural Desert Patina.

Probus was a successful general and a conscientious administrator. During his six-year tenure, he repelled numerous barbarian invasions and quelled several internal revolts. But according to Edward Gibbon in The Decline of the Roman Empire, he demonstrated leniency to the vanquished whenever possible. Hence, his most common coinage invokes Clementia, the goddess of mercy and acquittal.

Probus, AD 276-282.

AR antoninianus, 23mm, 3.7g, 12h; uncertain mint.

Obv.: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.

Rev.: CLEMENTIA TEMP; Emperor standing right holding scepter, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left leaning on scepter; uncertain letter in exergue.
 

Edited by thenickelguy
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1297148882_19.00EgyptianTetradrachmofDiocletianTycheHoldingRudderandCornucopiaA..jpg.6526097556fb0b24368032dafda4ec95.jpg

1001567717_19.00EgyptianTetradrachmofDiocletianTycheHoldingRudderandCornucopiaB..jpg.b82cfa567cb714b13a987f18ebad3a5f.jpg

Egyptian Tetradrachm of Diocletian, Tyche Holding Rudder and Cornucopia.
Ancient Coins - Egyptian Tetradrachm of Diocletian, Tyche Holding Rudder and Cornucopia.
EGYPT. Alexandria.

Diocletian, AD 284-305.

BI tetradrachm, 21mm, 7.7g, 12h; Struck 286/7.

Obv.: A K Γ OVA ΔIOKΛHTIANOC C?B, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.

Rev.: Tyche, kalathos on head, standing facing, head left, holding rudder and cornucopia; LΓ
Ref.: Milne 4079; Emmett 4082.

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616153459_19.00MaximianusHerculianusTetradrachmA.jpg.8a2a7badc79c5c8c5d2c6943afd3358c.jpg

227333480_19.00MaximianusHerculianusTetradrachmB.jpg.73cf45fa2c811b4ca4705ffa69376df7.jpg

Alexandrian tetradrachm of Maximian, Eirene (Pax) reverse.

EGYPT. Alexandria.
Maximianus Herculius, AD 286-305.
Æ Tetradrachm, 20mm, 6.9g, 12h; Dated RY 1.
Obv: A K M OVA MAZIMIANOC CEB; Laureate, draped bust right.
Rev: Eirene standing left, holding scepter and branch; L - A
Ref.: Dattari 5860.

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2143287643_24.00FollisofLiciniusIJupiterA.jpg.7613e0b8afa916e5013cf4c5f908e00f.jpg

10828956_24.00FollisofLiciniusIJupiterB.jpg.21c1150d33a02875494e144de1833373.jpg

Follis of Licinius I Jupiter, Antioch Mint. Natural Desert Patina. RARE Variant, R2 in RIC.
Ancient Coins - Follis of Licinius I Jupiter, Antioch Mint. Natural Desert Patina.


The IOVI CONSERVATORI types are an important part of the history of Christendom, as they were struck immediately after the Edict of Milan (an agreement between Licinius I and Constantine I) which gave Christianity legal status and a reprieve from persecution.
Eventually Licinius would renege on the agreement and the empire would be plunged into a civil war from which Constantine would emerge as victor.

These coins were struck during the uneasy peace between the cousin kings. Jupiter is the special protector of Roman emperors. This is a very rare variant in the RIC sample, R2. The coin has a completely natural and attractive "desert" patina.

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Posted (edited)

This came on from the latest Kunker. Was on my wishlist for a long long time. 
First Meris tetradrachm from Macedonia. 
-Not the best photos. Havent set up my camera properly.  So iphone photos. 

 

 

7B126374-52AC-4B17-B51B-644060E19789.jpeg

409AAF0A-AA18-4EBF-907D-22C1430648A0.jpeg

Edited by Pantoffel
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6 hours ago, Pantoffel said:

This came on from the latest Kunker. Was on my wishlist for a long long time. 
First Meris tetradrachm from Macedonia. 
-Not the best photos. Havent set up my camera properly.  So iphone photos. 

 

 

7B126374-52AC-4B17-B51B-644060E19789.jpeg

409AAF0A-AA18-4EBF-907D-22C1430648A0.jpeg

Wow, that is a beautiful example! 

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PUBLIUS QUINCTILIUS VARUS
[IMG]
AE OF ANTIOCHEIA, SYRIA

RPC 4252, SNG Cop. 92, 20.4mm, 8.03 grams, Dated year 27 = 5/4 B.C.E.

Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus to right

Reverse: Tyche of Antioch seated to right, holding palm branch; below, river-god Orontes swimming right, in right field, date ZK (year 27 = 5/4 B.C.E.)

This rare coin was struck during Varus' assignment as Governor of Syria from 7 - 4 B.C.E. Varus guarded the borders from Parthia and violently quelled unrest in Judaea and Samaria. Josephus records an incident wherein after the death of Herod., Varus occupied Jerusalem and crucified 2,000 Jews.

Later Varus was transfered to the Northern front, where he met disaster fighting the Germanic tribes in the Teutoburg forest. Three legions under his command, legions XVII, XVIII and XIX were completely annihilated. This caused emperor Augustus great grief and he was said to have cried out on occasion "Quintili Vare, legiones redde!" or "Quinctilius Varus, give me back my legions!"

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Posted (edited)

This arrived in the mail today. I'm no @Roman Collector, but I do like coins of Faustina II, especially the ones showing her with her children in various numbers and combinations.

The dealer described the coin as an orichalcum dupondius, but it's one of those types described in the reference books as a "dupondius or as." I suspect that it may well be the latter, since the weight (11.5 g.) is a bit low for a dupondius, and I see nothing more than a slight hint of the telltale yellowish color of orichalcum (although it is a bit paler than most of my non-dupondius bronzes). Also, all but one bronze coin of this type listed on ACSearch were sold as asses, including a number that weighed over 12 g.

Faustina II [Junior] (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AE As or orichalcum Dupondius, Rome Mint, 161 AD. Obv. Draped bust right, hair in chignon behind, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Two infant boys seated on draped throne (pulvinar), each raising an arm towards the other, with hands touching, SAECVLI FELICIT; S - C across fields. RIC III [Marcus Aurelius] 1666, BMCRE IV Marcus Aurelius 991, Cohen 194, RCV II 5302, Dinsdale 006660 [variety without stars above boys’ heads] [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (2020) at p. 69; photo at p. 75 (see http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04%20-%20Faustina%20II%20-%20Undated,%20158-176%20%28med_res%29.pdf)]. 25 mm., 11.5 g. Purchased from Incitatus Coins (Steve McBride), St. Johns, NL, Canada, May 2022.*

 image.jpeg.8143e86991521638df0a947577a770cc.jpeg

*The two infant boys are Faustina II’s twin sons b. 31 Aug 161 AD: Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus (the older twin, d. 165 AD) and Commodus, the ninth and tenth children of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina II.

I already had the denarius version of this type:

Faustina II [Junior] (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 161 AD. Obv. Draped bust right, hair in chignon behind, wearing stephane, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Two infant boys seated on draped throne (pulvinar), each raising an arm towards the other, with hands touching [compass dot between them], SAECVLI FELICIT. RIC III [Marcus Aurelius] 712, RSC II 191 [variety without stars above boys’ heads], Sear RCV II 5260 (ill.), BMCRE IV Marcus Aurelius 139, Dinsdale 005600(a) [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (2020) at p. 57; photo at p. 62 (see  http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04 - Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (med_res).pdf)]. 17.5 mm., 3.39 g., 12h. [Same footnote as preceding coin.]

image.jpeg.9b28f314c713e5ef61af279c01be88a8.jpeg

Here's Faustina II with one child:

Faustina II (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius, ca. 162/163 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. draped bust right with hair in chignon behind, wearing double strand of pearls, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA ./ Rev. Fecunditas (or Faustina as Fecunditas) standing facing, head right, holding long scepter in right hand and, with left hand and arm, infant with its arms raised towards its mother (representing Marcus Annius Verus, b. ca. 162 AD*), FECVNDITAS. RIC III MA 677, RSC II Faustina II 99c (Faustina with double strand of pearls), Sear RCV II 5252, BMCRE Marcus Aurelius 92 (var. with Faustina wearing single strand of pearls). 18.46 mm., 3.54 g. 

image.jpeg.39c3f051d2af0522b596fcae7fb5c41d.jpeg

*See Dinsdale Ch. 4 p. 51 & n. 1 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04 - Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (med_res).pdf) at p. 51] ("This issue refers to the birth of M. Annius Verus in 162"). See also https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Marcus_Annius_Verus_Caesar : “Marcus Annius Verus Caesar (born 162 or 163 – 10 September 169) was the 12th of 13 children of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius and Empress Faustina the Younger. Annius was made caesar on 12 October 166 AD, alongside his brother Commodus, designating them co-heirs of the Roman Empire. Annius died on 10 September 169, at age seven, due to complications from a surgery to remove a tumor from under his ear. His death left Commodus as the sole heir. . . . He was given the name of Marcus Annius Verus because it was the original name of his father, Marcus Aurelius” -- as well as his grandfather and great-grandfather. [Remaining footnotes omitted.]

So that's Faustina II with one and two children. Here she is with three children:

Antoninus Pius Æ Dupondius, Rome, ca. 159-160 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Radiate head right, ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII / Rev. Pietas [representing Faustina II] standing left, holding globe in extended right hand and infant in left arm, two children standing at her feet, one on each side , each with one arm raised [probably representing the Emperor’s three granddaughters then living, namely Marcus Aurelius’s and Faustina II’s daughters Annia Faustina (a/k/a Faustina III), Lucilla, and Fadilla; issued before birth of Cornificia in Aug. 160], PIET-ATI - AVG COS IIII, S-C across fields. RIC III 1035, Sear RCV II 4280 (ill.), Cohen 625. 25.5 mm., 15.57 g. [Ex. Naville Numismatics, Auction 28, Jan. 22, 2017, Lot 611, previously in Italian collection (with old ticket in Italian in name of “Antonino Pio”)

image.jpeg.5a3169c0b066d8fe207949cb1eaf361e.jpeg

And here she is with four children:

Faustina II [Junior] (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius, Rome Mint, Dec. 160 AD. Obv. Draped bust right, hair in chignon behind, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Faustina as Fecunditas, standing front, head left, holding infant in each arm, two other young children standing beside her to left and right, holding onto her gown; FECVND AVGVSTAE.  RIC III [Marcus Aurelius] 676, RSC II 95, Sear RCV II 5251, BMCRE 89, Dinsdale 005120 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176  (http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04%20-%20Faustina%20II%20-%20Undated,%20158-176%20%28med_res%29.pdf) at p. 54; photo at p. 60]. 17.0 mm., 3.29 g.*

 image.jpeg.0311b9876c4d45ac7b0b96a15a9bf396.jpeg

*See Foss, Roman Historical Coins, page 143, identifying the two standing children depicted on this coin as Annia Faustina [a/k/a Faustina III] (oldest child) and Lucilla (third oldest child), and identifying the two infants in Faustina’s arms as Fadilla (seventh child) and Cornificia (eighth child). The coin was probably issued to celebrate the birth of Cornificia, the then-youngest child, in August 160 AD.

I have nothing showing Faustina II with five children, but here she is with six:

Faustina II (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AE Sestertius, ca. 161 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Draped bust right, low chignon at back of head, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Felicitas (or Faustina as Fecunditas) standing left, between four girls (two standing at each side), holding two infants in her arms, each with a star over its head (representing the Dioscuri), TEMPOR FELIC [-IC almost entirely worn off], S - C across fields. RIC III 1673 (at p. 147), var. [no stars above infants’ heads]; BMCRE MA 949 var [same]; Cohen 222; Dinsdale 006760 & n. 1 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04 - Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (med_res).pdf) at p. 70] (“Minor rev. variation: sometimes each infant held in arms has star above head”). 31 mm., 24 gm. Purchased from Victor’s Imperial Coins, March 2021. Ex. CNG E-Auction 476, 9/09/2020, part of Lot 762; ex. BLS Collection.*

 image.jpeg.6348b94c71c2704e3c4829dcf99d267e.jpeg

*This variation of RIC III 1673 (with stars above the two infants’ heads) is unlisted in RIC or BMCRE, and appears to be mentioned only in the footnote to Dinsdale 006760. (RIC III 1677 does have stars above the infants’ heads, but is an as, not a sestertius.)  Of the 14 other examples found on acsearch of RIC 1673 and 1674 (the same design as 1673 but with a diadem on Faustina’s head; see Sear RCV II 5284), only one other example (of RIC 1673) has the stars above the infants’ heads. See https://www.acsearch.info/image.html?id=6215913 (Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 568, 4 Aug 2019). 

The four girls standing on either side of Felicitas on the reverse of this type have been identified as Marcus Aurelius’s and Faustina II’s daughters Annia Faustina (a/k/a Faustina III), Lucilla, Fadilla, and Cornificia -- the last of whom was born in 160 AD. The two infants held in her arms have been identified as Faustina II’s twin sons b. 31 Aug 161 AD: Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus (the older twin, d. 165 AD) and Commodus, the ninth and tenth children of the royal couple. See Foss, Roman Historical Coins.

Edited by DonnaML
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That's a very nice example of the middle bronze of that coin, @DonnaML. Mine's not exactly FDC, but I really like it because it was a gift to me from Henry Clay Lindgren back in the 1990s. Even though the highlights in the photo appear brassy, it's clearly an as in-hand, with reddish copper on the high points. Should I upgrade it? Perhaps, but even if I do, I'm not going to remove this one from my collection -- it has too much sentimental value.

Faustina Jr SAECVLI  FELICIT S C As.jpg

Faustina II, AD 147-175.
Roman Æ as, 9.78 g, 26.1 mm, 5 h.
Rome, AD 161.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, r.
Rev: SAECVLI FELICIT SC, draped throne on which there are two infant boys with stars above their heads.
Refs: RIC 1666; BMCRE 991; Cohen 194; RCV 5302.
Notes: Ex Henry Clay Lindgren.
 
This coin is also known with a stephaned bust, but it's rare. The stephaned busts on the denarii and sestertii, however, are quite common. This is NOT my coin:
 
Faustina Jr SAECVLI  FELICIT S C As diademed M&M GmbH.jpg
Roman Æ as or dupondius, RIC—; BMCRE 991n. Münzen & Medaillen GmbH (Auction 41), 11 December 2014, lot 154.
 
Edited by Roman Collector
Add an apostrophe -- yes, I'm that OCD.
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This type seems to almost always be in pretty rough condition.. I purchased this example as the detail of Homer is quite pleasing to me - for the price..

 

 

image.png.8ac7cd581e5537dbf5add4ff7b6fa3fd.png

Ionia, Smyrna, c. 75-50 BC. Æ (22mm, 6.94g, 12h). Pasikrates, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo r. R/ Homer seated l., holding scroll; two monograms to l.

 

Edited by Constantivs
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Just to show how difficult it is sometimes to distinguish a dupondius from an as -- especially when it's an empress and you can't try to make the determination from whether an emperor's portrait is laureate (as) or radiate (dupondius), something that itself isn't always possible -- here's my new Faustina II as/dupondius (see above) between a Julia Titi dupondius to its left, and an Antoninus Pius dupondius to its right, with an Antoninus Pius as below. The weights of the four coins, respectively, are 12.23 g. (Julia Titi), 11.5 g. (Faustina II), 15.57 g. (Antoninus Pius dupondius), and 10.4 g. (Antoninus Pius as).

image.jpeg.9ca8334f0c67443202186fcb0975778e.jpeg

The Faustina II coin's shade of brown is rather close to the Julia Titi dupondius. On the other hand, it doesn't look much at all like the Antoninus Pius dupondius, and its weight, 11.5 g., is lower than both dupondii. On the third hand, its weight is higher than the Antoninus Pius as, which is only 10.4 g. despite having a 29 mm. diameter, the largest of any of these coins. And I do have this Hadrian dupondius, whose weight is only 11.36 g., essentially the same as the Faustina II coin:

image.jpeg.f5e92c84d6e6af0fae061dab090f9dec.jpeg

If anyone wants to offer an opinion on whether the Faustina II which is the subject of this thread is an as or a dupondius, please feel free!

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16 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

 

Just to show how difficult it is sometimes to distinguish a dupondius from an as -- especially when it's an empress and you can't try to make the determination from whether an emperor's portrait is laureate (as) or radiate (dupondius), something that itself isn't always possible -- here's my new Faustina II as/dupondius (see above) between a Julia Titi dupondius to its left, and an Antoninus Pius dupondius to its right, with an Antoninus Pius as below. The weights of the four coins, respectively, are 12.23 g. (Julia Titi), 11.5 g. (Faustina II), 15.57 g. (Antoninus Pius dupondius), and 10.4 g. (Antoninus Pius as).

image.jpeg.9ca8334f0c67443202186fcb0975778e.jpeg

The Faustina II coin's shade of brown is rather close to the Julia Titi dupondius. On the other hand, it doesn't look much at all like the Antoninus Pius dupondius, and its weight, 11.5 g., is lower than both dupondii. On the third hand, its weight is higher than the Antoninus Pius as, which is only 10.4 g. despite having a 29 mm. diameter, the largest of any of these coins. And I do have this Hadrian dupondius, whose weight is only 11.36 g., essentially the same as the Faustina II coin:

image.jpeg.f5e92c84d6e6af0fae061dab090f9dec.jpeg

If anyone wants to offer an opinion on whether the Faustina II which is the subject of this thread is an as or a dupondius, please feel free!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orichalcum

 

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This just in! My Timoleon. My big bro is Tim, but our grandmother used to call him Timo every now and again. So I picked this up to give to my niece and got to tell her that story (plus giving a 2,400 yo coin with the Pegasus on it to a 13 yo girl scored me major uncle points):

2844965_1652362054.l-removebg-preview.png.53011fa1492a9146d3cd984532eac14f.png

 

Edited by Ryro
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On 6/11/2022 at 5:07 PM, DonnaML said:

This arrived in the mail today. I'm no @Roman Collector, but I do like coins of Faustina II, especially the ones showing her with her children in various numbers and combinations.

The dealer described the coin as an orichalcum dupondius, but it's one of those types described in the reference books as a "dupondius or as." I suspect that it may well be the latter, since the weight (11.5 g.) is a bit low for a dupondius, and I see nothing more than a slight hint of the telltale yellowish color of orichalcum (although it is a bit paler than most of my non-dupondius bronzes). Also, all but one bronze coin of this type listed on ACSearch were sold as asses, including a number that weighed over 12 g.

Faustina II [Junior] (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AE As or orichalcum Dupondius, Rome Mint, 161 AD. Obv. Draped bust right, hair in chignon behind, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Two infant boys seated on draped throne (pulvinar), each raising an arm towards the other, with hands touching, SAECVLI FELICIT; S - C across fields. RIC III [Marcus Aurelius] 1666, BMCRE IV Marcus Aurelius 991, Cohen 194, RCV II 5302, Dinsdale 006660 [variety without stars above boys’ heads] [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (2020) at p. 69; photo at p. 75 (see http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04%20-%20Faustina%20II%20-%20Undated,%20158-176%20%28med_res%29.pdf)]. 25 mm., 11.5 g. Purchased from Incitatus Coins (Steve McBride), St. Johns, NL, Canada, May 2022.*

 image.jpeg.8143e86991521638df0a947577a770cc.jpeg

*The two infant boys are Faustina II’s twin sons b. 31 Aug 161 AD: Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus (the older twin, d. 165 AD) and Commodus, the ninth and tenth children of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina II.

I already had the denarius version of this type:

Faustina II [Junior] (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 161 AD. Obv. Draped bust right, hair in chignon behind, wearing stephane, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Two infant boys seated on draped throne (pulvinar), each raising an arm towards the other, with hands touching [compass dot between them], SAECVLI FELICIT. RIC III [Marcus Aurelius] 712, RSC II 191 [variety without stars above boys’ heads], Sear RCV II 5260 (ill.), BMCRE IV Marcus Aurelius 139, Dinsdale 005600(a) [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (2020) at p. 57; photo at p. 62 (see  http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04 - Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (med_res).pdf)]. 17.5 mm., 3.39 g., 12h. [Same footnote as preceding coin.]

image.jpeg.9b28f314c713e5ef61af279c01be88a8.jpeg

Here's Faustina II with one child:

Faustina II (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius, ca. 162/163 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. draped bust right with hair in chignon behind, wearing double strand of pearls, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA ./ Rev. Fecunditas (or Faustina as Fecunditas) standing facing, head right, holding long scepter in right hand and, with left hand and arm, infant with its arms raised towards its mother (representing Marcus Annius Verus, b. ca. 162 AD*), FECVNDITAS. RIC III MA 677, RSC II Faustina II 99c (Faustina with double strand of pearls), Sear RCV II 5252, BMCRE Marcus Aurelius 92 (var. with Faustina wearing single strand of pearls). 18.46 mm., 3.54 g. 

image.jpeg.39c3f051d2af0522b596fcae7fb5c41d.jpeg

*See Dinsdale Ch. 4 p. 51 & n. 1 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04 - Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (med_res).pdf) at p. 51] ("This issue refers to the birth of M. Annius Verus in 162"). See also https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Marcus_Annius_Verus_Caesar : “Marcus Annius Verus Caesar (born 162 or 163 – 10 September 169) was the 12th of 13 children of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius and Empress Faustina the Younger. Annius was made caesar on 12 October 166 AD, alongside his brother Commodus, designating them co-heirs of the Roman Empire. Annius died on 10 September 169, at age seven, due to complications from a surgery to remove a tumor from under his ear. His death left Commodus as the sole heir. . . . He was given the name of Marcus Annius Verus because it was the original name of his father, Marcus Aurelius” -- as well as his grandfather and great-grandfather. [Remaining footnotes omitted.]

So that's Faustina II with one and two children. Here she is with three children:

Antoninus Pius Æ Dupondius, Rome, ca. 159-160 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Radiate head right, ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII / Rev. Pietas [representing Faustina II] standing left, holding globe in extended right hand and infant in left arm, two children standing at her feet, one on each side , each with one arm raised [probably representing the Emperor’s three granddaughters then living, namely Marcus Aurelius’s and Faustina II’s daughters Annia Faustina (a/k/a Faustina III), Lucilla, and Fadilla; issued before birth of Cornificia in Aug. 160], PIET-ATI - AVG COS IIII, S-C across fields. RIC III 1035, Sear RCV II 4280 (ill.), Cohen 625. 25.5 mm., 15.57 g. [Ex. Naville Numismatics, Auction 28, Jan. 22, 2017, Lot 611, previously in Italian collection (with old ticket in Italian in name of “Antonino Pio”)

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And here she is with four children:

Faustina II [Junior] (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AR Denarius, Rome Mint, Dec. 160 AD. Obv. Draped bust right, hair in chignon behind, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Faustina as Fecunditas, standing front, head left, holding infant in each arm, two other young children standing beside her to left and right, holding onto her gown; FECVND AVGVSTAE.  RIC III [Marcus Aurelius] 676, RSC II 95, Sear RCV II 5251, BMCRE 89, Dinsdale 005120 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176  (http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04%20-%20Faustina%20II%20-%20Undated,%20158-176%20%28med_res%29.pdf) at p. 54; photo at p. 60]. 17.0 mm., 3.29 g.*

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*See Foss, Roman Historical Coins, page 143, identifying the two standing children depicted on this coin as Annia Faustina [a/k/a Faustina III] (oldest child) and Lucilla (third oldest child), and identifying the two infants in Faustina’s arms as Fadilla (seventh child) and Cornificia (eighth child). The coin was probably issued to celebrate the birth of Cornificia, the then-youngest child, in August 160 AD.

I have nothing showing Faustina II with five children, but here she is with six:

Faustina II (wife of Marcus Aurelius & daughter of Antoninus Pius), AE Sestertius, ca. 161 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Draped bust right, low chignon at back of head, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / Rev. Felicitas (or Faustina as Fecunditas) standing left, between four girls (two standing at each side), holding two infants in her arms, each with a star over its head (representing the Dioscuri), TEMPOR FELIC [-IC almost entirely worn off], S - C across fields. RIC III 1673 (at p. 147), var. [no stars above infants’ heads]; BMCRE MA 949 var [same]; Cohen 222; Dinsdale 006760 & n. 1 [Dinsdale, Paul H., The Imperial Coinage of the Middle Antonines: Marcus Aurelius with Lucius Verus and Commodus, Ch. 4, Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (http://romanpaulus.x10host.com/Marcus/04 - Faustina II - Undated, 158-176 (med_res).pdf) at p. 70] (“Minor rev. variation: sometimes each infant held in arms has star above head”). 31 mm., 24 gm. Purchased from Victor’s Imperial Coins, March 2021. Ex. CNG E-Auction 476, 9/09/2020, part of Lot 762; ex. BLS Collection.*

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*This variation of RIC III 1673 (with stars above the two infants’ heads) is unlisted in RIC or BMCRE, and appears to be mentioned only in the footnote to Dinsdale 006760. (RIC III 1677 does have stars above the infants’ heads, but is an as, not a sestertius.)  Of the 14 other examples found on acsearch of RIC 1673 and 1674 (the same design as 1673 but with a diadem on Faustina’s head; see Sear RCV II 5284), only one other example (of RIC 1673) has the stars above the infants’ heads. See https://www.acsearch.info/image.html?id=6215913 (Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 568, 4 Aug 2019). 

The four girls standing on either side of Felicitas on the reverse of this type have been identified as Marcus Aurelius’s and Faustina II’s daughters Annia Faustina (a/k/a Faustina III), Lucilla, Fadilla, and Cornificia -- the last of whom was born in 160 AD. The two infants held in her arms have been identified as Faustina II’s twin sons b. 31 Aug 161 AD: Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus (the older twin, d. 165 AD) and Commodus, the ninth and tenth children of the royal couple. See Foss, Roman Historical Coins.

Nice Faustina II coins collection, Donna. 

Here is my recent Lucilla denarius, with Faustina II's grandkids on the reverse.  🙂  

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Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus AD 161-169, AR Denarius (18mm, 3.19 gram) Rome
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA; draped bust r.
Rev: FECVNDITAS; Fecunditas seated r., holding child, young girl standing before her

RIC 765

Edited by happy_collector
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Posted (edited)

This arrived yesterday via DHL Express, along with the other two coins I purchased at the June 16 Roma Numismatics auction. As I mentioned before, I had no particular reason for buying it, other than the fact that I liked the two Victories and the palm tree:

Valerian I, Billon Antoninianus, AD 255-256 [Sear RCV III p. 269], Antioch Mint [or, “uncertain Syrian mint”; see id.]. Obv. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG / Rev. Two Victories affixing shield inscribed S.C to palm tree between them, VOTA ORBIS. RIC V.1 294, RSC IV 280 var. [no cuirass on RSC coin], Sear RCV III 9996 (ill. p. 269); Göbl MIR 1682e [R. Göbl et al., Moneta Imperii Romani, Band 35: Die Münzprägung des Kaiser Valerianus I / Gallienus / Saloninus / (253/268), etc. (Vienna, 2000)]. Purchased from Roma Numismatics Ltd., E-Sale 98, 16 Jun 2022, Lot 1411.  

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If anyone has any thoughts on the varying identifications of the mint that produced this coin, please share them.

 

Edited by DonnaML
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I'm waiting on many coins at the moment - I hope some will arrive next week.   This is the latest one I've added to Tantalus.

It's a diobol of a Thraco-Macedonian tribe - the Mygodonians or Krestonians, possibly.   These coins with the goat were attributed to Aigai, a city established bu Perdikkas, founder of the Macedonian monarchy.   Perdikkas had been instructed by the Delphic Oracle that he would found the capital of a great kingdom where he found a herd of nanny goats.   The coins were attributed to Agiai as they feature a goat, though as it's a billy goat rather than a nanny goat, they're likely not from Aigai.

This particular coin has an interesting provenance daating back to 1971 and it belonged to the late Sheik Saud al Thani, who famously spent billions on artworks for himself and museums in Qatar.   He spent $20 million on coins from the Prospero Collection (and then didn't pay).   He was sued eventually by a number of auction houses for being slow to pay up the very large bills he was accumulating - apparently, a satisfactory outcome was reached for all concerned!   This little coin would have been a very minor treasure for the Sheik, but it's an interesting piece.

Silver Diobol
Obv. - He-goat kneeling to right, head turned back to left; above and to right, pellet
Rev. - Quadripartite incuse square
Mint: (ca. 480-470 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 0.95g / 11mm / -
References:
  • HGC 3.1, 368 ("Aigai")
  • Lorber, Goats, Issue 15
  • SNG ANS 60 ("Aegae")
Provenances:
  • Ex. Collection Sheik Saud al Thani, NAC 123, 9 May 2021, lot 255
  • Ex. Elsen 89, 9 Sep. 2006, lot 749
  • Ex. Collection J. Desneux, Hess-Leu, 27-28 Apr. 1971, lot 107
Acquisition: Leu Numismatik Online auction Auction 11 #53 14-May-2022

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Edited by akeady
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Posted · Supporter

Just got a batch in today. Here's one of them, my very first Byzantine coin! It's a hefty piece. It's not in the best shape, but I thought for ~$25 it wasn't a bad deal:

 

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A recent 6 buck addition...

A very common ruler but has nice surfaces..

1911336918_s-l400(1).png.7e0a3a67a177553629dbf695613742b1.pngs-l400.png.b71d639a12a1c7a8233ec0a2607dd279.png

 

Harsha 1089-1101 AD (1st Lohara dynasty)
Copper Kaserah or Punchshi 18mm (6.12gr)
Obverse- Goddess Ardochsho/Lakshmi seated facing in half lotus position, with Nagari legend 'Ha' to left 'rsha' to right
Reverse- King standing facing and sacrificing at altar holding trident, with Nagari legend 'Deva' bottom
right

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Galatia. Ancyra. Septimius Severus AD 193-211. Ae 30 mm. 15.2 gm. Obv: AVT K A CЄΠT CЄOVHPOC AV, Laureate bust of Septimius right. Rev: MHTPOΠOΛЄΩC  ANKYPAC, Cybele facing left. sitting astride on lion walking right. Not found in the major references.  Apparently unpublished?

RPA6476.JPG

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CS2m6McJSaqltPJSRMGt_6bvfOLq.jpg

Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine AR Hexagram. Constantinople  Obv: Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine seated facing on double throne, each holding globus cruciger. δδ NN ҺЄRACILЧS ЄT ҺЄRA CONST.   Rev: Cross potent set upon globus set upon three steps; K to right. δЄЧS AδIЧTA ROMANIS. SB 798. 6.06 g. 610-641 AD.

 

 

 

Edited by MrMonkeySwag96
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