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CPK's Top 13 Coins of 2023 (Sorry, I just couldn't limit it to ten!)


CPK

CPK's Top 13 Coins of 2023 (Sorry, I just couldn't limit it to ten!)  

33 members have voted

  1. 1. Which coin(s) are your favorite?

    • John Hyrcanus Prutah
      0
    • Constantine I AE3
      3
    • Commodore Turner Coins
      3
    • Justinian I Solidus
      0
    • Septimius Severus Denarius
      8
    • Augustus Quinarius
      1
    • Antoninus Pius Denarius
      5
    • Septimius Severus Bridge As
      1
    • Akragas Hemidrachm
      9
    • Domitian Quadrans
      13
    • Trajan ITALIA REST As
      2
    • Lysimachos Tetradrachm
      13
    • Julius Caesar Lifetime Portrait Denarius
      14


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Hello to all my fellow Numisforum members! I hope that you are all doing well.

2023 has been a great collecting year for me. As a relative newcomer to this hobby, there is so much to learn and study - not just about the coins, but about ancient history in general. I owe much to all of you here on Numisforums for being so generous with your knowledge, for helping me with questions, and for inspiring me in my own collecting goals. Thank you!

My interest in ancient history is wide and varied, and my list reflects a bit of that wide general interest - coins of Judaea, Greece, Rome, and Constantinople - and others which I was compelled to leave off the list. I tried very hard to limit it to a Top Ten, but I just couldn't! So instead, I will present..

CPK's Top 13 Coins of 2023!

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13 – John Hyrcanus Prutah

JohnHyrcanusIprutah.jpg.ef8d582ec45b2171a2a2133d29328deb.jpg

HASMONEAN DYNASTY, John Hyrcanus, 134-104 BC
AE Prutah (14.32mm, 2.05g, 12h)
Struck 134-104 BC. Jerusalem mint
Obverse: Paleo-Hebrew inscription "Yehonanan the High Priest and Head of the Council of the Jews" surrounded by wreath
Reverse: Two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, pomegranate or poppy between the horns
References: Hendin 6177
Excellent obverse with complete inscription. Off-center reverse. Light orange earthen patina.

The main reason I purchased this coin was to go along with a presentation I did a few months ago on the Dead Sea Scrolls. The coin carries a few connections: first, not only being from the time period when the Qumran community was flourishing and engaged in writing the scrolls, but also struck a mere dozen miles away in Jerusalem; second, the coin's issuer, John Hyrcanus I, being the son of Simon Thassi, who has been identified by some as being the "Wicked Priest" referred to in some of the Qumran texts; and third, the coin's inscription being written in the same type of Paleo-Hebrew script that was used in many of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Since the main interest in the coin lay in the inscription, I took some pains to find an attractive specimen with a full obverse. Forvm Ancient Coins was the vendor of choice – and though it was not an inexpensive purchase, I think it was well worth it.

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12 – Constantine the Great AE3

ConstantineIAE3VOTXXX.jpg.de63557f63c24f62de95fd0fc521eb12.jpg

CONSTANTINE I, AD 306-337
AE3 (20.86mm, 2.66g, 6h)
Struck AD 329-330. Rome mint
Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Constantine I right
Reverse: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG around edge, VOT • XXX in two lines within laurel wreath; RFP below
References: OCRE VII 322, RCV 16226
Well centered and struck. Area of flatness on reverse. A magnificent portrait with toned silvering.

I’ve taken something of a mild specialist interest in Constantine. Probably not since Augustus had there been such a pivotal figure in ancient history – it is well-nigh impossible to imagine world history from the 4th century onwards without the influence of Constantine. His conversion to Christianity, the establishment of Constantinople, and his other reforms/building projects essentially marked the close, for better or for worse, of the traditional Roman empire and ushered in the new age of Byzantine and medieval history. I would rank Constantine along with Alexander the Great and Augustus as the three most influential rulers in all of ancient history.

I purchased this coin solely for the magnificent obverse portrait. It is certainly (IMO) one of the finest numismatic portraits of Constantine I’ve ever seen – including those on solidi and commemorative types. This is all the more extraordinary since during the late 3rd and early 4th centuries numismatic portraiture had declined sharply in realism. A minor “renaissance” seems to have happened under Constantine, exemplified by this coin.

What strikes me most about this portrait is its sense of majestic gravity and regal splendor. I see in it the true Constantine - Dominus Noster, Maximus Augustus - sole ruler over the largest and most powerful Empire on Earth. The proportions are exquisitely executed; the detail is superb. Constantine's expression is serious and grave but not without its humanity - he almost looks like he is about to smile. Crowned with a beautifully rendered rosette diadem, cuirassed, and draped, he presents an impressive, kingly figure, surrounded by his name and titles.

The reverse is a common type but also is very attractive - well-struck (although with a few areas of flatness.) I do really like the balance and symmetry of these VOT reverse types. All in all, very nice coin, and not that expensive to boot!

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11 – Commodore Turner coins

GratianAE3TurnerColl.jpg.379cc46c3f1ad1034272da1716401362.jpg

GRATIAN, AD 367-383
AE3 (18.37mm, 2.51g, 6h)
Struck AD 375-378. Siscia mint
Obverse: D N GRATIA-NVS P F AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Gratian right
Reverse: GLORIA RO-MANORVM, emperor advancing right, dragging captive with right hand and holding labarum in left; P|S/P in fields, ΔSISCA in exergue
References: OCRE IX 21b, subtype xlvb; RCV 20066
Pleasant brown surfaces with good detail.
From the collection of Commodore Daniel Turner (1794-1850), naval veteran of the War of 1812 and later captain of the USS Constitution.

MaximianRadiateTurnerColl.jpg.a5d909c1fb0dd85408b8733bfa5ce68e.jpg

MAXIMIAN, AD 286-305
AE Post-Reform Radiate (22.17mm, 2.91g, 12h)
Struck AD 295-299. Cyzicus mint
Obverse: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust of Maximian right
Reverse: CONCORDIA MI-LITVM, Maximian, in military attire, standing right holding short scepter and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, holding long vertical scepter; KS in center field
References: OCRE VI 15b, RCV 13315
Old collection patina with copper-bronze highlights.
From the collection of Commodore Daniel Turner (1794-1850), naval veteran of the War of 1812 and later captain of the USS Constitution.

 

I’m cheating a bit here by including two coins under this heading. But in this case the attraction for me is not so much in the coins themselves (although they are perfectly fine) so much as the historical provenance. They are both from the collection of US Commodore Daniel Turner.

Turner.png.936e885706db74bf64bf29940637db67.png

Daniel Turner was born in 1794 on Staten Island, New York. On January 1 of 1808 he received his midshipman’s warrant and was assigned to the USS Constitution. Later, he was transferred to the USS President – another of the six original frigates built by the fledgling United States Navy.

During the War of 1812, Turner assumed command of several different vessels, and distinguished himself enough to receive a Congressional silver medal for action and a sword from the State of New York.

After the war, Turner served on various ships in the Mediterranean Squadron and in the West Indies Squadron. Turner returned to the USS Constitution as captain in 1839, a position he held until 1841, after which he was placed in command of the Brazil Squadron. Turner returned to the US in 1846, where he died suddenly on February 4, 1850.

In addition to being a competent naval commander, Daniel Turner was also a keen coin collector, and during his career he accumulated a large collection of ancient coins, which he stored in a wooden chest along with his own handwritten labels.

165 years later, the Turner descendants consigned this collection to Cowan’s Auction house. The coins had sat undisturbed in the chest for 165 years; apparently nobody in the family shared the Commodore’s collecting passion. Their loss was my gain, I suppose!

As you can see, the coins themselves are quite nice. The Gratian is actually a rather rare subtype, and both have good eye appeal and are well-preserved. And you can see the Maximian coin pictured in one of the auction photos.

At least as appealing, though, are the nearly 200-year-old handwritten labels penned by Daniel Turner himself. The paper is very fragile, but the writing is still clear, done by fountain pen (or possibly quill?) in a neat script.

Maximian label, showing both sides:

CommodoreTurnertag(Maximian).jpg.92f21931e556f8513c48090794491a3e.jpg

Gratian label, one-sided:

CommodoreTurnertag(Gratian).jpg.48f99d4ca3493084d06451b9cb89526c.jpg

Attractive coins with a 200-year-old provenance steeped in old Americana – what’s not to like?

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10 – Justinian I Solidus

JustinianIsolidus.jpg.20e5068e7c5975ca1e5da7de85270a5f.jpg

JUSTINIAN I, AD 527-565
AV Solidus (20.95mm, 4.32g, 6h)
Struck 542-565. Constantinople mint, 5th officina
Obverse: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian I facing, holding globus cruciger in his right hand and with a shield over his left shoulder
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGGG E, angel standing facing, holding long staff surmounted by a staurogram in right hand and a globus cruciger in left; star in right field, CONOB in exergue
References: DOC 9e, MIB 7, SB 140

As my first ancient gold coin – and only my second Byzantine coin – this solidus was something of a bucket list item. Like the Athenian Owls, these solidi of Justinian I are common and run about the same in cost. There’s nothing too remarkable about the coin itself and I don’t have much to say about it. The condition isn’t that great, but it’s respectable and helped make the coin affordable to me.

Justinian I was one of the last great Latin-speaking emperors; he gave his name to the monumental legal reforms in the Code of Justinian, built the Hagia Sophia, and generally expanded the power and grandeur of the Byzantine Empire. His wars to retake the West were less beneficial and had the ultimate effect of draining the finances of the Empire without offering any lasting gain. Still, he is justly regarded as being one of the great rulers of antiquity, and I’m happy to own a small piece of this history.

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9 – Septimius Severus Denarius

SeptimiusSeverusdenariusNeptune.jpg.7c45a806d5acb9367c1f651e5e6b1a5a.jpg

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS, AD 193-211
AR Denarius (19.71mm, 3.70g, 12h)
Struck AD 209. Rome mint
Obverse: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimius Severus right
Reverse: P M TR P XVII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, foot on rock, right hand resting on upper leg, left hand holding long trident
References: RIC IV 228, RCV 6346
A beautiful specimen, choice EF with lustrous fields, perfectly centered on a large and heavy flan.
From the Mark Salton Collection. (1914-2005)

This coin is one of my more recent acquisitions. It’s a case of where everything comes together – style, condition, eye appeal, and provenance – to create a wholly attractive specimen.

The coin itself has a lovely old cabinet tone, with hints of iridescence and rich mint luster. I love the fact that it’s so perfectly centered and struck that the dotted border is complete on the reverse and nearly so on the obverse. Also, I find the heavy weight of 3.70 grams really satisfying for some reason.

The provenance to the Mark Salton Collection is the icing on the cake. Salton (born Max Schlessinger) came from a long line of established German coin dealers, going back to the early 1800's. His father, Felix Schlessinger, ran a coin dealership until he was imprisoned and murdered by the Nazis during the Holocaust; Max and his brother managed to escape, eventually settling in America. Their story is a fascinating one - you can read more about it here.

The coin also came with Salton's hand-written paper envelope, dated 1946:

SeptimiusSeverusdenSaltonColl.jpg.9c3de55a88f89a7192e2944a31141dfb.jpg

It will remain a favorite in my collection.

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8 – Augustus Quinarius

Augustusquinariusvictory.jpg.8c1ab35ed7c38ab47da363938130c3cd.jpg

AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - AD 14
AR Quinarius (16.11mm, 1.76g, 4h)
Struck 25-23 BC. Emerita Augusta mint
Obverse: AVGVST, bare head of Augustus right
Reverse: P CARISI LEG, Victory standing right, crowning trophy
References: RIC I 1a, RCV 1642
Attractive dark cabinet toning with a particularly fine portrait.
"The colony of Emerita Augusta (modern Mérida) was founded in 25 BC by P. Carisius, governor of Lusitania, for veterans of legions V Alauda and X Gemina who had recently participated in Augustus' campaigns in north-western Spain."
- David R. Sear, Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. I (p. 324.)

The quinarius is an interesting denomination. A small silver coin valued at half a denarius, they were struck intermittently from around 211 BC until the 3rd century AD. This is my first example of the denomination, struck under Augustus early in his reign. The portrait on this coin is unusually fine – and a great example of the earlier, more idealized bust style of Octavian/Augustus. The reverse is well-preserved with some mineral deposits. The coin is also deeply toned which I find very appealing.

The provenance of this coin is interesting as well – from the collection of William Taylor McAnich (sic?), U.S. Army Lt. Col UN Peacekeeper during the Palestine/Israel conflict from 1951-1955. Lt. Col. McAnich apparently accumulated a very large collection during his time in the Middle East, which was auctioned off by Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc. a few years ago. According to the auction house’s information, these coins were acquired from “Shlomo, a well known and respected antiquities dealer, in the Old City of Jerusalem.” Same Shlomo as this gentleman?

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7 – Antoninus Pius Denarius

AntoninusPiusdenariusMoneta.jpg.9c1d47fc5395236ab5e61819246bcbe2.jpg

ANTONINUS PIUS, AD 138-161
AR Denarius (16.38mm, 3.29g, 6h)
Struck AD 144. Rome mint
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P COS III, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right
Reverse: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae
References: RIC III 76b, RCV 4092
A scarce type, with attractive old cabinet toning and a wonderful portrait struck in high relief.

I had been looking for a top-quality portrait denarius of Antoninus Pius (partly inspired by @Severus Alexander's fabulous specimen) when I saw this one come up for sale. It didn’t take me long to hit the ‘buy’ button.

In hand the coin was even better than the photos. The portrait is undoubtedly one of the best I’ve ever seen, struck in high relief and beautifully toned. The reverse is also well done and crisp in its detail. The one drawback is the rather tight flan, but I guess you can’t have everything!

This type, as it turns out, is pretty scarce. I think I found maybe 6 or 7 on acsearch.info. Rarity always adds appeal to a coin, for me anyway.

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6 – Septimius Severus Bridge As

SeptimiusSeverusasbridge.jpg.8e057433317a2193790c6a128f2863d6.jpg

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS, AD 193-211
AE As (25.59, 9.08g, 12h)
Struck AD 208. Rome mint
Obverse: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust of Septimius Severus right, with aegis on left shoulder
Reverse: P M TR P XVI COS III P P S C, bridge of single curved span, flanked by triple triumphal arches surmounted by statuary, five figures crossing bridge, boat in river below
References: OCRE IV 786b, RCV 6472

Speaking of rarity, here is a good example of what is meant by the term ‘decrepit rarity’. Visually, there isn’t a lot to recommend this coin. But the combination of extreme rarity, and the satisfaction of not having paid much for it, gives this coin a high spot on my list of favorites.

How rare is the type? The coin is given a rating of R3 in the RIC reference work – meaning 6 to 10 specimens known in the examined collections. In my online searches at the time, I was able to find 16-17 specimens total. The renowned expert on Severan coinage (and ancient numismatics in general), Curtis Clay, also commented: “My die catalogue of Severan asses, which I drew up mainly in the 1970s, with only occasional later additions, now includes 32 Bridge asses of Septimius, struck from three reverse and five obverse dies.”

The exact identity of the bridge depicted on the reverse is uncertain, but theories include a military bridge built over the Firth of Forth during Severus's Caledonian campaign, the Milvian Bridge north of Rome, or some other bridge in Rome.

See this thread for more information.

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5 – Akragas Hemidrachm

SicilyAkragashemidrachmeagle-crab.jpg.e3bd040d7bdef5ad10da81a61a558bba.jpg

SICILY, AKRAGAS
AR Hemidrachm (14.76mm, 1.86g, 2h)
Struck 420-406 BC
Obverse: Eagle facing left, standing on and tearing at hare
Reverse: Crab; below, fish swimming right
References: SNG ANS 1003-9
Toned. Well centered strike. A pleasing example of the artistic talents of classical Akragas.

The coins of classical Akragas are famously among the most beautiful and recognized coins of the ancient world. The city itself was founded around 582 BC by Greek colonists from Gela, a nearby city about 40 miles to the east. Akragas quickly became one of the leading centers of art and culture in the Classical world and this is reflected in the coinage.

Of the larger denominations, such as the tetradrachm or decadrachm, I could only dream. But the hemidrachm, though a smaller canvas, also features the same degree of artistry, and are much more affordable. But even so, a nice specimen doesn’t come super cheap, so it was a while before I found one that struck a good balance between affordability and quality.

The strike on this coin is even and centered, and the silver toning helps bring out the details. It’s a very pleasing little coin aesthetically and I’m delighted to own one of these iconic coins.

See this thread for more about the coin.

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4 – Domitian Quadrans

DomitianquadransRhinoceros.jpg.48a1ceffa31b2ab6f21a23cb8ec159ab.jpg

DOMITIAN, AD 81-96
AE Quadrans (17.62mm, 2.58g, 6h)
Struck AD 84/5. Rome mint
Obverse: African rhinoceros, head down, charging left
Reverse: IMP DOMIT AVG GERM around large S C
References: OCRE II 250, RCV 2835
A choice specimen, perfectly centered and well-struck from artistic dies. This type recalls a rhinoceros which fought in the Colosseum during Domitian's reign; these coins were likely distributed as largesse to the crowds in attendance on that occasion.

There are several areas of interest for me in collecting ancient coins – historical significance, fine artistry, and coins with animals, to name a few. This coin fulfills those and more.

Aside from fascinating and unusual rhino obverse, I’d been attracted to this type ever since reading about the theory that they were handed out as souvenirs to the crowds at the Colosseum during the public games under Domitian. To me, owning such a coin is what this hobby is all about – that connection through thousands of years to a specific event, a time and place.

The coin is, unsurprisingly, a popular type, and this one is an unusually fine specimen. It was one of the few times I’ve ever bid live on a coin, and I just barely won it. But I’ve been repaid many times over by the satisfaction it gives me in my collection.

The rhinoceros on this coin is very well-done – perhaps the engraver had been to the games and seen the actual animal? The strike is strong and centered, both obverse and reverse. A true masterpiece.

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3 – Trajan ITALIA REST As

TrajanasITALIAREST.jpg.83168c0e892fb07719257b743bb7b78f.jpg

TRAJAN, AD 98-117
AE As (27.59mm, 10.04g, 6h)
Struck AD 103-111. Rome mint
Obverse: IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate head of Trajan right, with paludament on left shoulder
Reverse: SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan standing left holding eagle scepter, extending hand to Italy kneeling before with two children between; ITALIA REST in exergue
References: RIC -, BMCRE -, RCV -, C -, Woytek 367b (same dies), Strack 412. This coin published on Numista (369513)
R4. Extremely rare, apparently the fourth specimen known.

My third favorite coin of 2023 is this extremely rare as struck under Trajan. Though I’ve posted about this coin before, I hope you’ll forgive me going through the story again!

Trajan’s ‘ITALIA REST’ or ‘REST ITAL’ (Italy Restored) series of coinage was struck in aurei as well as the three main AE denominations. All types must have been struck in very limited numbers, but the as is perhaps the rarest of them all. Extensive research has uncovered just three other specimens besides this one: one in the Munich collection, one in the Vienna collection, and a very worn specimen pictured on Wildwinds.com. Strack and Woytek are the only references I know of which even mention the type, and both cite just two specimens (Munich and Vienna.)


This coin is a double-die match to the Vienna specimen illustrated in Woytek. It also appears to be a double-die match to the Wildwinds coin, though given that coin’s state of wear it’s hard to be certain. I have so far not been able to examine and compare dies with the Munich specimen, but it is at least plausible to suppose that it too is a double-die match given the extreme rarity of the type – which, if it were the case, would mean that all known examples were struck from a single pair of dies.


Moreover, in my research I was also able to examine 6 of the 8 dupondius versions of this type known to Woytek, and it appears that all 6 share the same reverse die as the asses. Could it be that only one reverse die of this type was produced, and used for both denominations? It's certainly possible if not likely, given the available evidence.

The reverse scene itself is interesting and recalls the ‘ALIM ITAL’ series of coinage struck at the same time or immediately afterwards. David R. Sear comments on that type:

“The alimenta was a scheme under which needy children were provided support through the investment in agriculture of funds donated by wealthy philanthropists (including the emperors Nerva and Trajan).”
- David R. Sear (Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II, p. 95)

Though this coin does not explicitly mention the ‘alimenta’, the presence of the children raising their hands to the emperor, and the legend ‘Italy Restored’, both suggest a commemoration (at least in part) of that beneficent program.

The research is still ongoing, and most recently I’ve reached out to the wildwinds coin contributor to see if he has any other information about the type. I also am still trying to establish contact with the Munich Collection to see if they can send me pictures of their specimen.

See this thread for the more information.

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2 – Lysimachos Tetradrachm

LysmiachostetradrachmAlexander-Athena.jpg.3b6f93106b2493bb947b0c38dfba41a4.jpg

LYSIMACHOS, 306-281 BC
AR Tetradrachm (28.30mm, 16.15g, 12h)
Struck 297 - 281 B.C. Alexandreia Troas mint
Obverse: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with the horn of Ammon
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; cornucopia to inner left, Λ under throne
References: SNG Stockholm 845 (same dies)
A rare variant. Toned with scratches on reverse. Well centered portrait of Alexander in fine style.

There isn’t much to say here – I think the coin is self-explanatory: a fantastic portrait of the one and only Alexander the Great. Though it is No. 2 on my list, it is without question my most "awe-inspiring" coin in hand: the large heavy silver, beautifully toned, struck in such high relief as to be practically round sculpture. The reverse is a little worn and scuffed, but it’s not too bad and anyway the obverse is the main focus on these coins.

As it happens, this is a somewhat rare variant and is a double die-match to several auction listings which themselves claim to be double die-matches to the Stockholm plate coin.

See this thread for more on the coin.

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1 – Julius Caesar Lifetime Portrait Denarius

JuliusCaesardenariuslifetime.jpg.7979f4ae0a1e124de285d1ad0f46db19.jpg

JULIUS CAESAR, 49-44 BC
AR Denarius (18.91mm, 3.53g, 12h)
Struck late February to early March, 44 BC. Rome mint
Obverse: CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, wreathed head of Julius Caesar right
Reverse: L·BVCA, fasces and winged caduceus in saltire; axe, clasped hands, and globe in three quarters
References: RRC 480/6, RCV 1409
Toned. A scarce, late-lifetime portrait denarius of Julius Caesar. Caesar received the title of Dictator Perpetuo (Dictator for Life) in February of 44 BC; this coin would have been struck mere weeks before his assassination on the Ides of March that same year.

A lifetime portrait denarius of Julius Caesar is a bucket list item for many collectors, and for good reason – there are few coins more weighted with historical significance, fascination, and intrigue. These coins aren’t terribly rare, but the sky-high demand means that they are among the priciest of ancient coins. I wasn’t sure when, if ever, I would get one.

When I saw this one come up for sale at a just-so affordable price, I bit the bullet and bought it. Wow! I couldn’t believe it at first. The coin took a while to come (some shipping mix-ups), but eventually I had it in hand. What an incredible piece of history – this type was struck at most maybe within a few weeks of Caesar’s assassination on the ides of March. Just holding it gives you a sense of awe – again, that connection through time. The coin is worn, but not too bad; the essential details are all for the most part intact. It’s also nicely toned.

The reverse type is a bit rare, which is a nice little bonus. But for me the primary attraction is the obverse portrait of Gaius Julius Caesar – DICT PERPETVO. This coin is without question my favorite in my entire collection – my top collecting goal achieved!

My original thread on this coin.

Thanks for looking! I can't wait to see what 2024 has to bring and I wish you all a very successful and satisfying year of collecting!

Edited by CPK
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As a retired Navy guy, I had to vote for the Commodore Turner coins. That history is just too cool!

I also voted for the Augustus quinarius since ya know...Victory...Also, I just learned about this denomination of coin this year and have been looking into them more. Very interesting little silver coins. Yours has a great portrait of Augustus.

All-in-all I'd say you had a great collecting year. Thanks for sharing!

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CPK, Congrats on a sensational year 🤩! Your photos, descriptions, documentation, & personal notes make this presentation one to enjoy 😍. My favorites are: #2, the Lysimachos Tet with a portrait of Alexander the Great, a wonderful example of Hellenistic art, #7, the finely engraved denarius of Antoninus Pius, with an exceptionally fine portrait, & #4, the finely engraved Rhino quadrans; the anepigraphic obverse adds beauty to the striding Rhino. I wonder if this coin was used to gain entrance to the Coliseum or if it was a souvenir to an event there 🤔?

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On 12/3/2023 at 6:12 PM, ambr0zie said:

Well done! 

I voted for the Akragas (great coin!), the Domitian rhino quadrans (a coin that was on my bucket list for a long time and I was delighted to get an example last year) and of course, Julius Caesar. 

Congratulations! 

 

 

On 12/3/2023 at 6:32 PM, Cordoba said:

great list, and neat provenances. my favs were the akragas and lysimachos!

 

On 12/3/2023 at 6:37 PM, Ryro said:

WoWiE! What a great year. I had to go with the beautiful Septimius Denarius, Akragas and the Lysimachos tet to top things off. And huge coingrats on such a lovely lifetime JC🤩

 

On 12/3/2023 at 6:48 PM, JayAg47 said:

Great provenances and great coins! my favourites are the JC denarius, Lysimachos tetradrachm, and the crab hemidrachm! I also like the denarius of Septimius Severus. 

 

On 12/3/2023 at 7:04 PM, Furryfrog02 said:

As a retired Navy guy, I had to vote for the Commodore Turner coins. That history is just too cool!

I also voted for the Augustus quinarius since ya know...Victory...Also, I just learned about this denomination of coin this year and have been looking into them more. Very interesting little silver coins. Yours has a great portrait of Augustus.

All-in-all I'd say you had a great collecting year. Thanks for sharing!

 

22 hours ago, kirispupis said:

Very nice additions for the year! I'd have to go with the Julius Caesar lifetime portrait. Someday I hope to add one myself.

 

22 hours ago, Nerosmyfavorite68 said:

It's a fun, well-presented list.  I'm voting #1 for the Lysimachos, followed closely by the Julius Caesar.

There's a well-balanced mix of rarity, iconic coins, and very old provenance. 

 

 

21 hours ago, David Atherton said:

Wow. What a great list, especially the top 5! Added bonus that your personal favourite is #1. You had a fantastic year!

 

11 hours ago, Qcumbor said:

Great additions. My preference goes to that APi denarius of tremendous style. Not far behind are the Akragas hemidrachm (love the crab on it) and the Septimius Severus denarius (for its provenance)

Congrats and thanks for sharing those beauties !

Q

 

10 hours ago, Al Kowsky said:

CPK, Congrats on a sensational year 🤩! Your photos, descriptions, documentation, & personal notes make this presentation one to enjoy 😍. My favorites are: #2, the Lysimachos Tet with a portrait of Alexander the Great, a wonderful example of Hellenistic art, #7, the finely engraved denarius of Antoninus Pius, with an exceptionally fine portrait, & #4, the finely engraved Rhino quadrans; the anepigraphic obverse adds beauty to the striding Rhino. I wonder if this coin was used to gain entrance to the Coliseum or if it was a souvenir to an event there 🤔?

Thank you all for your votes and comments! It was a good year - almost too good, actually. I need to slow down a bit. 😄

I'm glad to see that the Antoninus Pius denarius is getting a few more votes - in terms of portrait artistry alone, I think that one and the Constantine are my favorites (glad to see he got a vote too! 😉 ) Of course when taking everything else into account they rank lower on the list.

No votes yet for the decrepit Severus Bridge As. 😜 It's interesting how sometimes the uglier coins in our collections can mean more to us than the Choice EF beauties. It keeps the hobby varied and interesting!

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Excellent coins, congratulations. Voted for 5, 4 & 12. 

I collect Greek, so really appreciate your coin from Akragas, very fine style. Though I know nothing about it, the coin with the rhino is awesome! And I really liked your coin of Constantine the Great. 

And in hindsight should have given a vote to your Julius Caesar portrait coin, who wouldn't want to own one of those!

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What a fantastic year, Connor. No wonder you had trouble narrowing it down to 10.

My favorites are the Septimius Severus denarius (great style / centering / type / provenance), the Commodore Turner coins (one of the best provenance stories I’ve read in a while) and the Lysimachus tet (just an overall great coin!).

I will give a special mention to your A-Pi / Moneta for its excellent style and to your John Hyrcanus Prutah. I wrote a lengthy write up on JH prutat several years ago on CT where I made the case that this is the first ever Jewish coin.

John_Hyrcanus_Prutah.jpeg.3361084362d84f6c436194cc329d3109.jpeg

IMG_6613.jpeg.1b315c66aea4271ba95c9b031cdc8635.jpeg

Congrats on a great year!

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Great 2023 additions, Coingratulations! I really like the photos of the coins, and the digital display. Nicely done! Also the little write ups per coin are very interesting. Ill go through them more carefully. 

I decided to pick 3 favorites, but could have been more. But in the end I went for the Severus bridge reverse (i just love coins with structures/buildings on the reverse!), the Lysimachos tetradrachm and the Caesar portrait. Although i had difficulty with the last, because the Severus denarius with Neptune reverse is a stunner! 

Have a great 2024!

Edit: and the fact that the Severus bridge issue is very worn did not prevent me voting for it. Such a great coin and rarity! 

Edited by Limes
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I cannot blame you for posting 13/ instead of ten. I would have done the same. However, we the members will benefit the most, since we are now able to admire all thirteen beauties. My picks are the Septimus Severus and that great Rhino Quadrans.! Really amazed by some of your old provenances!

John

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So many beautiful coins , it was difficult to choose one or two , I took five. Also, superb photos. Congratulations !

2 – Lysimachos Tetradrachm
3 – Trajan ITALIA REST As
4 – Domitian Quadrans
7 – Antoninus Pius Denarius
12 – Constantine the Great AE3

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On 12/4/2023 at 7:52 PM, Di Nomos said:

Excellent coins, congratulations. Voted for 5, 4 & 12. 

I collect Greek, so really appreciate your coin from Akragas, very fine style. Though I know nothing about it, the coin with the rhino is awesome! And I really liked your coin of Constantine the Great. 

And in hindsight should have given a vote to your Julius Caesar portrait coin, who wouldn't want to own one of those!

Thanks for the kind words!

On 12/5/2023 at 3:35 AM, Curtisimo said:

What a fantastic year, Connor. No wonder you had trouble narrowing it down to 10.

My favorites are the Septimius Severus denarius (great style / centering / type / provenance), the Commodore Turner coins (one of the best provenance stories I’ve read in a while) and the Lysimachus tet (just an overall great coin!).

I will give a special mention to your A-Pi / Moneta for its excellent style and to your John Hyrcanus Prutah. I wrote a lengthy write up on JH prutat several years ago on CT where I made the case that this is the first ever Jewish coin.

John_Hyrcanus_Prutah.jpeg.3361084362d84f6c436194cc329d3109.jpeg

IMG_6613.jpeg.1b315c66aea4271ba95c9b031cdc8635.jpeg

Congrats on a great year!

Thanks Curtis! That is a really nice prutah - and I have to say I like the writing style better than on mine. It reminds me a bit more of the style of the DSS. 😉 

On 12/5/2023 at 7:51 AM, Limes said:

Great 2023 additions, Coingratulations! I really like the photos of the coins, and the digital display. Nicely done! Also the little write ups per coin are very interesting. Ill go through them more carefully. 

I decided to pick 3 favorites, but could have been more. But in the end I went for the Severus bridge reverse (i just love coins with structures/buildings on the reverse!), the Lysimachos tetradrachm and the Caesar portrait. Although i had difficulty with the last, because the Severus denarius with Neptune reverse is a stunner! 

Have a great 2024!

Edit: and the fact that the Severus bridge issue is very worn did not prevent me voting for it. Such a great coin and rarity! 

Thanks for the compliment! Those are excellent choices. I think we have some common collecting interests. 😉 

On 12/5/2023 at 8:07 AM, panzerman said:

I cannot blame you for posting 13/ instead of ten. I would have done the same. However, we the members will benefit the most, since we are now able to admire all thirteen beauties. My picks are the Septimus Severus and that great Rhino Quadrans.! Really amazed by some of your old provenances!

John

Thanks John!

On 12/5/2023 at 12:27 PM, happy_collector said:

Great coins, @CPK. I especially like your #1, 2 and 5. The first 2 are coin designs on my wishlist. I picked up a similar Akragas Hemidrachm (your #5) last year, and I like the design a lot. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

Thanks! There just is something charming about those Akragas coins - and artistically they are so well done! 👍

20 minutes ago, singig said:

So many beautiful coins , it was difficult to choose one or two , I took five. Also, superb photos. Congratulations !

2 – Lysimachos Tetradrachm
3 – Trajan ITALIA REST As
4 – Domitian Quadrans
7 – Antoninus Pius Denarius
12 – Constantine the Great AE3

Thanks! Nice to see Trajan getting some love. 😄

Edited by CPK
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  • 3 weeks later...

Really fine coins, thanks for sharing. I'm involved with wildlife conservation so I had to vote for the rhino.  Not that that the Romans were exactly kind to the animals, but still... I also voted for the lifetime Caesar portrait denarius; a bucket-list coin for anyone.

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