Jump to content

Would you buy this coin for this price?


JayAg47

Recommended Posts

Probably the cheapest Aureus I've seen for retail in years. If I were to buy this coin it would definitely be my most expensive coin, 3 times as costly as my Justinian Solidus. Although an Aureus would be a crown jewel in my collection, the condition is what keeps me from pulling the trigger. If I'm going big, I'd rather have a nice coin which would somewhat reduce the regret. Hoping someone would buy this before I loose my sanity and spend three grands and have no coin budget for the coming years. 

Untitled.png.68666a8ac8a9d113e41a5f42d3e4dd12.png

 

Edited by JayAg47
  • Like 3
  • Thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

I noticed this coin when it appeared and remarked how cheap it is for an aureus.

I would not buy it for the following reasons:

  • Although I'm no expert in this coinage, from a quick look the weight seems a bit low. Most others I see are around 7.5g vs 6.98g for this one. For this amount of money, that would make me suspicious enough to do a good amount of research to try to uncover some provenance.
  • I'm not familiar with the seller and from a look at their coins they don't seem to specialize in ancients. Do they have the knowledge therefore to guarantee this type of coin?
  • While I'm usually fine with a certain amount of wear, gold coins typically are well-preserved. I did spend this much once on a very worn coin, but it was also exceedingly rare. I would therefore have difficulties spending so much on a very poor copy of a relatively common coin.

IMHO the price is correct on it, but this coin will require the right kind of buyer, and that buyer is not me.

  • Like 5
  • Yes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, kirispupis said:

I noticed this coin when it appeared and remarked how cheap it is for an aureus.

I would not buy it for the following reasons:

  • Although I'm no expert in this coinage, from a quick look the weight seems a bit low. Most others I see are around 7.5g vs 6.98g for this one. For this amount of money, that would make me suspicious enough to do a good amount of research to try to uncover some provenance.
  • I'm not familiar with the seller and from a look at their coins they don't seem to specialize in ancients. Do they have the knowledge therefore to guarantee this type of coin?
  • While I'm usually fine with a certain amount of wear, gold coins typically are well-preserved. I did spend this much once on a very worn coin, but it was also exceedingly rare. I would therefore have difficulties spending so much on a very poor copy of a relatively common coin.

IMHO the price is correct on it, but this coin will require the right kind of buyer, and that buyer is not me.

You are right about gold coins in general being well preserved, but aureii of Nero in particular are often well-worn - a tribute to the wealth and prosperity of the Empire he inherited, but also a consequence of his debasement of the aureus that caused the earlier, heavier coins to disappear from circulation, and his own lighter coins to be used in commerce.

I don't know, an aureus at this price would be tempting, but if I had $2,000 to spend I would probably either buy a nice Julius Caesar lifetime portrait denarius, or else several $400 - $500 coins.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was about to write "No way! - you'll get better for less at auction", but after looking at some recent prices the difference isn't as great as I'd assumed.

I still wouldn't buy it - Nero aurei are relatively common and you will get something nicer for the same money or a bit less.

I've got 4 Nero aurei, all of which cost less than this (though I haven't bought one since 2014) - ranging from less than $300 in 2010 from CNG for this Indian imitation:spacer.png

to a half-decent Nero & Poppaea frm Gitbud & Naumann in 2014:spacer.png

I remain a sucker for something cheap - e.g. this from Naville in April (£1236 with fees):spacer.png

I just need to get someone to fill in the holes and fix the nick and I can sell it for megabucks 😄

Good luck in your quest!

Aidan.

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

I urge you to pass. It probably won't be tomorrow, but I really think that with patience and diligent searching, you'll find a more pleasing aureus of Nero or maybe Tony Pius at this price point or lower; quite possibly with more wear, but without the surface issues that make this coin remarkably unpleasant, to my eye anyway.

Edited by Phil Davis
  • Like 5
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely understand the temptation, but I have generally regretted the coins cheap for their type that I have purchased "just to have one." If a coin doesn't please me in some way visually, with some exceptions, I typically don't want it and I've found my appreciation for it won't increase over the years. It often decreases. I'd rather buy fewer, more expensive, coins, than more cheaper ones. I've found that "less is more" (at least less of higher visual appeal) works for me and sustains my interests for longer periods. I'm in the pass camp on this one as well.

  • Like 4
  • Yes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Purely as an aesthetic judgement, I don’t like the damage on it.  Of course, de gustibus non est disputandum.

I will freely confess to buying an aureus in much worse shape.

image.jpeg.cb96ff1d7b5da093ea17b28d589dcd6d.jpeg

 

There are several differences which drew me to this coin.  First, the damage is part of its value as a historical relic of Barbarian Europe.  Second, it was way cheaper.  

Incidentally,  Leu misattributed the coin.  The figure on the reverse is actually Fides, thus it is a very appropriate pendant to present to one’s spouse.  It is not often a winning bid at auction can actually be used to make my wife happy - such opportunities need to be seized with both hands.  
 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

By way of comparison, this Nero hammered at 950 GBP + juice in Naville earlier this month. More actual wear than the OP coin, but it's nonetheless worlds more pleasant to my eye. There'll be other opportunities like this:

image00506.jpg

The OP will always be a problem coin; this is simply a worn one.

Edited by Phil Davis
  • Like 11
  • Yes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, kirispupis said:

I noticed this coin when it appeared and remarked how cheap it is for an aureus.

I would not buy it for the following reasons:

  • Although I'm no expert in this coinage, from a quick look the weight seems a bit low. Most others I see are around 7.5g vs 6.98g for this one. For this amount of money, that would make me suspicious enough to do a good amount of research to try to uncover some provenance.
  • I'm not familiar with the seller and from a look at their coins they don't seem to specialize in ancients. Do they have the knowledge therefore to guarantee this type of coin?
  • While I'm usually fine with a certain amount of wear, gold coins typically are well-preserved. I did spend this much once on a very worn coin, but it was also exceedingly rare. I would therefore have difficulties spending so much on a very poor copy of a relatively common coin.

IMHO the price is correct on it, but this coin will require the right kind of buyer, and that buyer is not me.

But you'll jump right in..

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm never going to spend this much money at this stage in life, I just wanted to see what you guys think of acquiring such a coin at this unusual price. I hope to see this Nero do rounds on eBay for 2-3 times of what it's worth, on top of being slabbed 😂

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
2 hours ago, JayAg47 said:

I'm never going to spend this much money at this stage in life, I just wanted to see what you guys think of acquiring such a coin at this unusual price. I hope to see this Nero do rounds on eBay for 2-3 times of what it's worth, on top of being slabbed 😂

It's one coin that won't  be slabbed.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there's too many reasonable alternatives to this:

If it's gold your after, you can get almost flawless Constantius II/Valentinian/Valens for close to that price.

If it's Nero your after, you can get a beautiful Nero Denarius for a fraction of that price.

If it's a gold Nero you're after, an increase in budget by X percent will get you an example that is more than X percent nicer.

E.g. doubling your budget will get you an example that's more than twice as attractive. 

  • Like 4
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll echo the other comments. Yes, aureii are expensive, but there are better options out there, and I would never buy this one. An aureus a big chunk of the coin budget, and Im not loaded like many buyers out there, so be patient and critical..... And if I would have loads of cash to spend, I surely would not go for this one either! 

And the retail price for aureii are aimed at the buyers who dont take time to do proper research and have the patience to do so. There are better buys out there, at auctions. 

Just my opinion, though. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Silly of me to forget to post my only aureus. I think its safe to say that many buyers would move on and not spend their budget on this coin. Its worn, scratched, no provenance (that I can find anyway) and nothing special in terms of rarity. And when it comes to the budget (2500  euro's including the fees, I'm okay with it to share this, as one can look it up online anyway), I think there are better aureii of e.g. Nero out there. So why did I buy this one? I got this one for the reverse, as it has a special meaning regarding a personal circumstance and the birth of our youngest child.

So, guess what I am trying to say is that a certain coin may have a special, personal meaning for the buyer, while in the eyes of others that coin may be nothing special. (And yes, of course I would prefer to buy a beautiful aureus of Faustina tossing all those kids around, but there's also the case of budget and a wife overflowing with hormones.) My advice: when willing to spend most of your budget on one coin, you'd better make sure it's something special or because of a special occassion. It will make you enjoy the coin for a very long time, despite its flaws. 

16.5.png.3646049366e1c9fd6517fa93c55f487c.png

  • Like 8
  • Heart Eyes 1
  • Popcorn 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any time you buy a coin, ask yourself, "Is this a coin I will be happy with long term?" Long after the "At least it was affordable" feeling has passed, you'll say, "Man, that's an ugly coin."

It's true that I own some ugly coins -- but they are rare AF and I had no choice. But this one is not a rarity, it's a IVPPITER CVSTOS, for crying out loud.

Edited by Roman Collector
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to pile on - I'd recommend raising your budget to $2500 USD. My observation is that for less than $2000 you will rarely find a nice early Aureus that has good eye appeal and no hidden issues, at least in today's market. In the $2000 to $2500 range, you should be able to get a very pleasant example of a common issue of Vespasian, Titus or Domitian in Very Fine. In the $2500 to $3000 range, you can find a Good Very Fine or a Very Fine issue with a more interesting or popular reverse type. That type of money will get you a coin you will enjoy looking at, you will be proud to show to others and you won't have any trouble selling when the time comes. And I am speaking of Roma and CNG auctions or similar, not from a second-tier firm with a spotty reputation. Everyone makes mistakes, but a pedigree from a better auction house will let you sleep better and serve to protect your investment. 

A second recommendation is to be very selective and only buy and example that has an artistic quality that really appeals to you. Choose an example with a style that appeals to you over a better-quality specimen that might be the same price. Most early Aurii have a good style of engraving, but the styles do vary and everyone has their own personal preferences. Vespasian can look "jolly" or very "stern" depending on the Celator.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" and I'm not seeing any compliments. I would pass on it personally for every reason mentioned so far.

I try to find positives in everything and the only positive I can say about this coin is that you would never have to have an argument about condition if you could find a future buyer. 

I've seem much better for less money over the past year or so at auction. You need the right auction and Fortuna on your side and not on the side of the competition.

Here's a slabbed coin that sold last week at Tauler & Fau for  1300 Euros or about 2500 Australian Dollars when you include the buyers fee. To my eye, it's a more attractive coin and over 7 g.

image01363.jpg

 

  • Like 6
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...