Jump to content

Another coin to add in my Dacia subcollection


ambr0zie

Recommended Posts

As some of you know, I live in the territory that was once Dacia. 
A powerful kingdom that wasn't in a perfect relationship with Rome. Unification of the Dacian tribes was performed under king Burebista (82-44 BC), who was allied with Pompey. This could have ended in an early Roman-Dacian war, as Caesar perceived Dacia as a threat to Rome. But Caesar was assassinated in the same year as Burebista. 

Here is the maximum territory of Dacian state under Burebista.  
I now live in the territory controlled by the Carpians. I was born and raised in the Britolages area. 

Approximate extent of Dacia circa 40 BC

After Burebista's death, Dacia was divided into smaller kingdoms and reunited again under king Decebalus (historians still do not have a clear theory about him - in the last years the consensus is that "Decebal" is a title, not a name).
Actually, there are not many things known about Dacians before the Trajanic wars. The language is a mystery (a small number of words suspected to be Dacian are still used in Romanian language, they are quite unique and the resonance is a little strange). No names are clearly known to be of Dacian origin. Just some deities and that's about it. 

Anyway when I started collecting ancient coins, one of the major goals is obtaining coins related to Dacia. From the Independent Dacia period, this is quite difficult as their (presumably) coinage meant mostly imitations of Philip II/Alexander drachms and tetradrachms - very stylized. BUT ... many specialists insist those are in fact celtic coins. 

I have a book treating Dacian coinage and I was surprised to see there were mints producing Republican coins. Clandestine? Semi-official? difficult to tell. 

There are also the Koson coins, but those are out of my price range. 

So.... the only thing remaining was to obtain Trajan coins with Dacian soldiers or clear connection to Dacian wars. Which I did and I am very glad to receive one of the Dacian soldiers denarius type I was missing. 

image.png.17d2a5a06ded210ac91da71cb514ceef.png

Trajan (98-117 AD) AR Denarius. 17,3 mm, 3,2g. AD 103-111.
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P. Bust of Trajan, laureate, slight drapery on left shoulder / COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC, DAC CAP. Mourning Dacian seated left on pile of arms.
RIC II 98; BMCRE 390; Woytek 283b; RSC 120

Very pleased with the portrait, the reverse artistry and the general aspect of this coin.

Here are my previous onesimage.png.0a0514503cb0f84bf596c4ed7289a32f.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome. AD 103 - AD 111
Denarius AR
19 mm, 3,13 g
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, bust of Trajan, laureate, right (draped on left shoulder) / COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC DAC CAP, Dacian, wearing peaked cap, his hands bound behind him, seated right on a pile of shields and arms
RIC II Trajan 96, RSC 118, BMC 385
 

 

image.png.9f5ca20d1a5d87ebcd60f340e051d95b.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome. AD 103 - AD 111
Denarius AR
19 mm, 3,02 g
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, bust of Trajan, laureate, right / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI Dacian (woman?), wearing peaked cap, in attitude of mourning, seated right on oval shield; curved sword (falx) below
RIC II Trajan 219, RSC 529, BMC 175
 

Always wanted these 3 denarii and this is an excellent addition for me. 

Other Trajan coins related to Dacia

image.png.4a5e6c2064c5fd15efaaaf3a679e21f6.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome Denarius AR 20 mm, 2,96 g. AD 103 - AD 111
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, bust of Trajan, laureate, right (sometimes draped on left shoulder)  / COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Victory, naked to hips, standing right, left foot set on a step, inscribing DACICA on shield
RIC II 130; BMCRE 322; Woytek 346b; RSC 80
 

And of course, a Trajan's column coin

image.png.02972364019133e4a71ba681d49c374a.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome. Denarius AR. 19 mm, 2,60 g. AD 112 - AD 114
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, bust of Trajan, laureate, draped, right / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Column of Trajan surmounted with a statue of Trajan; two eagles at base and a wreath with spirals and dots on column 
RIC II Trajan 292, RSC 558 
 

I also have the popular Decius antoninianus (probably his fascination for Trajan made a coin with Dacia mandatory)
Note - I noticed the interesting discussion regarding the symbol on the staff. On my coin the artistry is ... absent. Since the wolf was the symbol of Dacia, in my opinion this is what the engravers intended to depict. 

image.png.b950973c12ccb935e043f198d1b84f32.png

Trajan Decius AD 249-251. Rome Antoninianus AR 21 mm, 2,28 g. Struck AD 249 - AD 251 
IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, bust of Trajan Decius, radiate, draped, cuirassed, right / DACIA, Dacia, draped in long robe reaching feet, standing left holding staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco)
RIC IV Trajan Decius 12b
... and a very budget version sestertius 

image.png.ba7a9609b72f0cb8f707d5ae398b1209.png

Trajan Decius AD 249-251. Rome. Sestertius Æ. 30 mm, 15,13 g. AD 249 - AD 251
IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, bust of Trajan Decius, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right / DACIA SC, Dacia, draped in long robe reaching feet, standing left holding staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco)
RIC IV Trajan Decius 112 
 

The last coin I have related to Dacia is a Volusian provincial (difficult to photograph but it wasn't my best day as a photographer either)

image.png.ef15c46304513a4484647a9d96d6d6de.png

Volusian (251-253) Ӕ 26 of Dacia. 26 mm, 12 g. 
IMP CC VIB VOLUSIANVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / PROVINCIA DACIA, Dacia, standing left with branch & sceptre, between eagle & lion, AN V in exergue.
SGI 4360; RPC IX, 110; Varbanov 71
 

I don't know very much about this type of coins. It is clear that they were struck from Philip to Gallienus. Information I found

The issue of local coins began in Dacia in 246/247. At that time emperor Philip the Arab granted the right to strike coins in Dacia. The last provincial coins were struck in 255/257, with AN XI in exergue.

The coins PROVINCIA DACIA were also found in Pannonia and Moesia Superior, Roman provinces neighbouring Dacia. Most probably these coins were struck at Sarmisegetusa, but there are opinions that the coins were struck at Apulum or even at Viminacium. (The provincial coins struck at Viminacium in Moesia Superior have very similar design with the Dacian ones.) Many Provincia Dacia coins are heavily worn, a sign that they circulated for a long time.

I intend to buy a Hadrian coin related to Dacia (I lost one about a year ago, a Sestertius, but the condition was quite horrible, advanced bronze disease and very poor shape, I could have bought it for a very low price, but for my tastes it went for too much. I also know Pius had some (rare) coins with Dacian motifs. 

Let's see coins related to Dacia!

  • Like 23
  • Yes 1
  • Cool Think 2
  • Clap 1
  • Heart Eyes 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Silver coin (AR Denarius) minted during the reign of TRAJAN between 112 - 114 A.D. Obv. IMP.TRAIANO.AVG.GER.DAC.P.M.TR.P.COS.VI.P.P.: dr. and laur. bust r. Rev. S.P.Q.R.OPTIMO.PRINCIPI.: Genius stg. l., holding patera and grain ears. RCS #989. RSCII #398 pg. 97. RICII #275 pg.263. DVM #32/7.

 image.png.adc34cc8dd4d164c3f2bd6f20d642621.pngimage.png.29cc659846e8a8361f11a74271c99498.png

- Silver coin (AR Denarius) minted at Rome during the reign of TRAJAN in 108 A.D. Obv. IMP.TRAIANO.AVG.GER.DAC.P.M.TR.P.:  laur. hd. r. Rev. COS.V.P.P.S.P.Q.R.OPTIMO.PRINCIP.: Aequitas stg. l., holding scales and cornucopia. RCS #978. RSCII #85a. RICII #119 pg. 252. RCVSII #3122. (nearly centered, legends complete, good metal with light golden-grey tone, a pleasant coin).

image.png.bb0cc4287eed3f3638b5567941bfe1dd.png

 

image.png

  • Like 19
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my only coin related to Dacia, the same type as your new coin. 

88.jpg.21d42dd783f51c2c1dbe5ffa32a46ba9.jpg

Trajan, AD 98-117.
AR Denarius, 3.3 g, 18.1 mm, 6 h.
Rome mint, AD 103-111.
Obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P; Bust of Trajan, laureate, right, draped on left shoulder.
Rev: COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC DAC CAP; Dacian seated left on a pile of arms in an attitude of mourning; round him, left and right, various arms.
Refs: RIC 98.
Acquired from Silbury Coins, 30 September 2022.
This coin was part of the Ropsley hoard of 522 denarii found by a metal detectorist in Lincolnshire, England on 16 March 2018.  The hoard is believed to have been deposited between AD 150 and 152.
https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/894168
https://www.silburycoins.co.uk/hoards-and-research/the-ropsley-hoard/

Photo credit: Silbury Coins.

 

  • Like 20
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, ambr0zie said:

As some of you know, I live in the territory that was once Dacia. 
A powerful kingdom that wasn't in a perfect relationship with Rome. Unification of the Dacian tribes was performed under king Burebista (82-44 BC), who was allied with Pompey. This could have ended in an early Roman-Dacian war, as Caesar perceived Dacia as a threat to Rome. But Caesar was assassinated in the same year as Burebista. 

Here is the maximum territory of Dacian state under Burebista.  
I now live in the territory controlled by the Carpians. I was born and raised in the Britolages area. 

Approximate extent of Dacia circa 40 BC

After Burebista's death, Dacia was divided into smaller kingdoms and reunited again under king Decebalus (historians still do not have a clear theory about him - in the last years the consensus is that "Decebal" is a title, not a name).
Actually, there are not many things known about Dacians before the Trajanic wars. The language is a mystery (a small number of words suspected to be Dacian are still used in Romanian language, they are quite unique and the resonance is a little strange). No names are clearly known to be of Dacian origin. Just some deities and that's about it. 

Anyway when I started collecting ancient coins, one of the major goals is obtaining coins related to Dacia. From the Independent Dacia period, this is quite difficult as their (presumably) coinage meant mostly imitations of Philip II/Alexander drachms and tetradrachms - very stylized. BUT ... many specialists insist those are in fact celtic coins. 

I have a book treating Dacian coinage and I was surprised to see there were mints producing Republican coins. Clandestine? Semi-official? difficult to tell. 

There are also the Koson coins, but those are out of my price range. 

So.... the only thing remaining was to obtain Trajan coins with Dacian soldiers or clear connection to Dacian wars. Which I did and I am very glad to receive one of the Dacian soldiers denarius type I was missing. 

image.png.17d2a5a06ded210ac91da71cb514ceef.png

Trajan (98-117 AD) AR Denarius. 17,3 mm, 3,2g. AD 103-111.
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P. Bust of Trajan, laureate, slight drapery on left shoulder / COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC, DAC CAP. Mourning Dacian seated left on pile of arms.
RIC II 98; BMCRE 390; Woytek 283b; RSC 120

Very pleased with the portrait, the reverse artistry and the general aspect of this coin.

Here are my previous onesimage.png.0a0514503cb0f84bf596c4ed7289a32f.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome. AD 103 - AD 111
Denarius AR
19 mm, 3,13 g
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, bust of Trajan, laureate, right (draped on left shoulder) / COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC DAC CAP, Dacian, wearing peaked cap, his hands bound behind him, seated right on a pile of shields and arms
RIC II Trajan 96, RSC 118, BMC 385
 

 

image.png.9f5ca20d1a5d87ebcd60f340e051d95b.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome. AD 103 - AD 111
Denarius AR
19 mm, 3,02 g
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, bust of Trajan, laureate, right / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI Dacian (woman?), wearing peaked cap, in attitude of mourning, seated right on oval shield; curved sword (falx) below
RIC II Trajan 219, RSC 529, BMC 175
 

Always wanted these 3 denarii and this is an excellent addition for me. 

Other Trajan coins related to Dacia

image.png.4a5e6c2064c5fd15efaaaf3a679e21f6.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome Denarius AR 20 mm, 2,96 g. AD 103 - AD 111
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, bust of Trajan, laureate, right (sometimes draped on left shoulder)  / COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Victory, naked to hips, standing right, left foot set on a step, inscribing DACICA on shield
RIC II 130; BMCRE 322; Woytek 346b; RSC 80
 

And of course, a Trajan's column coin

image.png.02972364019133e4a71ba681d49c374a.png

Trajan AD 98-117. Rome. Denarius AR. 19 mm, 2,60 g. AD 112 - AD 114
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, bust of Trajan, laureate, draped, right / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Column of Trajan surmounted with a statue of Trajan; two eagles at base and a wreath with spirals and dots on column 
RIC II Trajan 292, RSC 558 
 

I also have the popular Decius antoninianus (probably his fascination for Trajan made a coin with Dacia mandatory)
Note - I noticed the interesting discussion regarding the symbol on the staff. On my coin the artistry is ... absent. Since the wolf was the symbol of Dacia, in my opinion this is what the engravers intended to depict. 

image.png.b950973c12ccb935e043f198d1b84f32.png

Trajan Decius AD 249-251. Rome Antoninianus AR 21 mm, 2,28 g. Struck AD 249 - AD 251 
IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, bust of Trajan Decius, radiate, draped, cuirassed, right / DACIA, Dacia, draped in long robe reaching feet, standing left holding staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco)
RIC IV Trajan Decius 12b
... and a very budget version sestertius 

image.png.ba7a9609b72f0cb8f707d5ae398b1209.png

Trajan Decius AD 249-251. Rome. Sestertius Æ. 30 mm, 15,13 g. AD 249 - AD 251
IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, bust of Trajan Decius, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right / DACIA SC, Dacia, draped in long robe reaching feet, standing left holding staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco)
RIC IV Trajan Decius 112 
 

The last coin I have related to Dacia is a Volusian provincial (difficult to photograph but it wasn't my best day as a photographer either)

image.png.ef15c46304513a4484647a9d96d6d6de.png

Volusian (251-253) Ӕ 26 of Dacia. 26 mm, 12 g. 
IMP CC VIB VOLUSIANVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / PROVINCIA DACIA, Dacia, standing left with branch & sceptre, between eagle & lion, AN V in exergue.
SGI 4360; RPC IX, 110; Varbanov 71
 

I don't know very much about this type of coins. It is clear that they were struck from Philip to Gallienus. Information I found

The issue of local coins began in Dacia in 246/247. At that time emperor Philip the Arab granted the right to strike coins in Dacia. The last provincial coins were struck in 255/257, with AN XI in exergue.

The coins PROVINCIA DACIA were also found in Pannonia and Moesia Superior, Roman provinces neighbouring Dacia. Most probably these coins were struck at Sarmisegetusa, but there are opinions that the coins were struck at Apulum or even at Viminacium. (The provincial coins struck at Viminacium in Moesia Superior have very similar design with the Dacian ones.) Many Provincia Dacia coins are heavily worn, a sign that they circulated for a long time.

I intend to buy a Hadrian coin related to Dacia (I lost one about a year ago, a Sestertius, but the condition was quite horrible, advanced bronze disease and very poor shape, I could have bought it for a very low price, but for my tastes it went for too much. I also know Pius had some (rare) coins with Dacian motifs. 

Let's see coins related to Dacia!

Ozie, You've got an excellent group of Roman coins related to Dacia ☺️. Being born & raised in Romania, do you speak the native tongue 🤔? I'm also curious if you have ever hiked in the Carpathian Mountains? Many different barbarian groups moved through Dacia during the Migration Period. Consider yourself lucky to live in an area so rich in history 😉. I do have a Trajan Decius / Dacia issue pictured below. TrajanDeciusAD249-2514.2gm22mm12h.jpg.22e196529839f6556cc783f1b5ed354a.jpg

                                                   Trajan Decius, AD 249-251, AR Double Denarius: 4.2 gm, 22 mm, 12 h.

  • Like 18
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A really wonderful Dacia collection you are putting together, @ambr0zie.  Here are two from Trajan showing Pax stomping on the head of a Dacian - a pretty direct representation of the Roman idea of "peace" - not so peaceful!  

A sestertius:

Trajan-Sest.PaxstompingDaciaAug2022(0).jpg.562b51876c3e465ea19c9c1c51e2b816.jpg

Trajan  Æ Sestertius (103-111 A.D.)  Rome Mint IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG G[ER DAC P]M TR P [COS V P P], laureate head right, aegis on far shoulder / S P Q R O[PTI]MO  PRINCIPI, S-C, Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopiae, right foot treading down on Dacian's head and shoulders left. Attribution:  Some auctions say this was struck 104-107 A.D.  but OCRE says 103-111 A.D. RIC II 503; BMCRE 801; Cohen 407; Woytek 200c; (24.81 grams / 31 x 30 mm) eBay Aug. 2022

A dupondius: 

Trajan-DupondiusPaxDacianApr2020(0).jpg.0ea2ea280c2e209f0579debfc249e2b8.jpg

Trajan  Æ Dupondius (103-111 A.D.) Rome Mint IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER [DAC PM TRP COS V PP], radiate bust r., with aegis / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI SC Pax standing left holding branch & cornucopiae; foot on Dacian's head and shoulders.  RIC 505 var. (no aegis). (11.15 grams / 27 mm) eBay April 2020

 

  • Like 20
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trajan Ae Sestertius 194/5-107 AD obv Bust right laureate drapery on far shoulder. Rv Victory standing right affixing shield labeled VIC DAC on palm RIC 528 Woytek 204cA26.90 grms 33 mm Photo by W. Hansentrajans30.jpg.f1570e98d99f3fd905ee84194f1e70f6.jpg

At the time that I had purchased this coin in 2020 I knew of the auction that I had acquired it from (CNG) as well as an Heritage auction in 2016. Using ACsearch I subsequently discovered it was in a second Heritage auction also in 2016 as well as a Goldberg auction in 2004. However last year I was going through the Newman Numismatic portal and found that this coin was in a CNG auction back in 1996. So what am I saying. On another thread people are discussing provenances. With a little work and some luck  one can sometimes find them. 

  • Like 16
  • Yes 1
  • Cookie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a few coin related to Trajan's Dacian wars, They are on my page about coins of Trajan that relate to historical events:

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/Trajan/

Here is one of the coins:

Trajan3sest1985c.jpg.44d46a9013abb0300cf737ca762dcc69.jpg

Sestertius. Large. 33-32 mm. 27.24 grams.
Bust of Trajan right, with long legend including numerous titles:
IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TRP COS VI PP
Struck 112-114.

DACIA AVGVST PROVINCIA, SC below
Dacia seated left on rocks, holding legionary eagle in left, with child holding bunch of grapes at her feet and a child holding two ears of grain behind her right knee.

RIC 621. Sear II 3183.

This type explicitly celebrates the new province of Dacia. The tiny figures show its agricultural wealth in wine and grain. Its accumulated wealth and gold mines were even more important. 

Visit that page to see other coins. Here is the URL again:
http://augustuscoins.com/ed/Trajan/

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 1
  • Yes 1
  • Heart Eyes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Al Kowsky said:

Being born & raised in Romania, do you speak the native tongue 🤔? I'm also curious if you have ever hiked in the Carpathian Mountains?

Of course I speak Romanian in day to day life. I only use English at work and on this forum. 

As for hiking, I am not the #1 mountain fan, but I did this a few times. I am lazy and I prefer going to the beach 😐

Great coins everybody, special thanks to @Valentinian for the great website.

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice coins.

Here are two Trajan examples:

normal_Trajan_08.jpg.5d70b5cec075638ffb0faa48b1a3b221.jpg

Trajan
AR-Denar
Obv.: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate head right, drapery on far shoulder
Rev.: COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC, Dacian seated left in mourning, on pile of captured arms, DAC CAP in exergue
Ag, 3.44g, 18.5mm
Ref.: RIC 098

 

normal_Trajan_03.jpg.8941fa9b4e75275f6096e7f89b2e9c80.jpg

Trajan
AR-Denar
Obv.: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right with drapery on left shoulder.
Rev.: [S P Q R OPTI]MO PRINCIPI / Pax seated left, holding branch and sceptre; at her feet, kneeling Dacian
Ag, 3.46g, 17.4x18.5mm
Ref.: RIC 188, BMC 216, C 417

 

 

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Valentinian said:

I have a few coin related to Trajan's Dacian wars, They are on my page about coins of Trajan that relate to historical events:

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/Trajan/

Here is one of the coins:

Trajan3sest1985c.jpg.44d46a9013abb0300cf737ca762dcc69.jpg

Sestertius. Large. 33-32 mm. 27.24 grams.
Bust of Trajan right, with long legend including numerous titles:
IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TRP COS VI PP
Struck 112-114.

DACIA AVGVST PROVINCIA, SC below
Dacia seated left on rocks, holding legionary eagle in left, with child holding bunch of grapes at her feet and a child holding two ears of grain behind her right knee.

RIC 621. Sear II 3183.

This type explicitly celebrates the new province of Dacia. The tiny figures show its agricultural wealth in wine and grain. Its accumulated wealth and gold mines were even more important. 

Visit that page to see other coins. Here is the URL again:
http://augustuscoins.com/ed/Trajan/

Impressive website, thanks for sharing ☺️.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you mean Provincia Dacia coins? If so, yes, I saw them in auctions at a much lower frequency than Viminacium.  and when I did, the prices were bigger. 

Not sure what you mean by search terms for catalogs. Usually in auctions they are described as Provincia Dacia. They are also found in RPC.

I think once, for a house that uses very short descriptions for coins (ruler/city/year) I saw a coin that was incorrectly described as Viminacium. The reverse scenes are almost identical (the animals - symbolizing 2 legions - are different) and the portrait styles are also identical. This is why I mentioned, from a source I personally trust, that there is a chance that Provincia Dacia coins are struck in Viminacium. The mint is unsure. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have multiple Dacia coins, but this one from Traianus Decius i bought for the obverse text:

tras.jpg.7906f82624bc3776b74a096d0ca52fe4.jpg

obv : IMP CAE TRA DEC AVG, rev :  DACIA; RIC 36a, Milan

 

 

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's unlikely that the PROVINCIA DACIA coins were made at Viminacium, a better possibility would be that both coinages were developed by the same set of die workers who did the dies which were then used in Viminacium and somewhere in Dacia, possibly Apulum. It's worth noting that both coinages work not as local coinage but as 'provincial' coinage, which means that they have a wider distribution area than any local coinage at the time. Very likely the monetary system for both Moesia Superior and Dacia between ca. 240 to 256/7 was unified and the coinage worked in a similar manner with the coinage of the 'Koinon' of the Greek world under Roman rule. And I think that the presence of these coins from Dacia to Moesia, Pannonia and up to Raetia shows that.

The discussion about the pre-Roman coinage as either 'Celtic' or 'Getae' or 'Geto-Dacian' is mostly political: the first to study the silver-based coinage of the Philip-Alexander imitations were living in the Habsburg and then the Austro-Hungarian state and their closer relations were to the Celtic world. Afterwards, in the 20th century, the Iron Curtain and the imbecile nationalistic veil forced over history by the communist Romanian regime made any and every claim by Romanian historians unreliable, which only prolonged the earlier designations of the coinage as 'Celtic'. The research work of C. Preda did gain some recognition and after 1990 his catalog is used by some auction houses too. But many auction houses don't have numismatists which are up to date with the state of the research as it stands and is accepted in the academic world now. This happens in many other fields, one that I am familiar with is the 'Byzantine' coinage where denominations are mumbled and lumped together because getting on par with the numismatic research is hard work and needs actual numismatists doing the work.

The imitation of republican coinage by transdanubian tribes -- btw, there was never a Dacian homogeneous state with Burebista, it was at most a confederation of tribes which came undone in 44BC -- continued until at least the mid 1st century AD. I read about the discovery of some 'republican' denarii dies made by local minters as late as the 1st century AD in an article from one of the multiple Romanian periodicals that are digitalized. Romania does actually put a lot of its research online, which is great.

Edited by seth77
  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, seth77 said:

I think it's unlikely that the PROVINCIA DACIA coins were made at Viminacium, a better possibility would be that both coinages were developed by the same set of die workers who did the dies which were then used in Viminacium and somewhere in Dacia, possibly Apulum. It's worth noting that both coinages work not as local coinage but as 'provincial' coinage, which means that they have a wider distribution area than any local coinage at the time. Very likely the monetary system for both Moesia Superior and Dacia between ca. 240 to 256/7 was unified and the coinage worked in a similar manner with the coinage of the 'Koinon' of the Greek world under Roman rule. And I think that the presence of these coins from Dacia to Moesia, Pannonia and up to Raetia shows that.

The discussion about the pre-Roman coinage as either 'Celtic' or 'Getae' or 'Geto-Dacian' is mostly political: the first to study the silver-based coinage of the Philip-Alexander imitations were living in the Habsburg and then the Austro-Hungarian state and their closer relations were to the Celtic world. Afterwards, in the 20th century, the Iron Curtain and the imbecile nationalistic veil forced over history by the communist Romanian regime made any and every claim by Romanian historians unreliable, which only prolonged the earlier designations of the coinage as 'Celtic'. The research work of C. Preda did gain some recognition and after 1990 his catalog is used by some auction houses too. But many auction houses don't have numismatists which are up to date with the state of the research as it stands and is accepted in the academic world now. This happens in many other fields, one that I am familiar with is the 'Byzantine' coinage where denominations are mumbled and lumped together because getting on par with the numismatic research is hard work and needs actual numismatists doing the work.

The imitation of republican coinage by transdanubian tribes -- btw, there was never a Dacian homogeneous state with Burebista, it was at most a confederation of tribes which came undone in 44BC -- continued until at least the mid 1st century AD. I read about the discovery of some 'republican' denarii dies made by local minters as late as the 1st century AD in an article from one of the multiple Romanian periodicals that are digitalized. Romania does actually put a lot of its research online, which is great.

Thank you for that interesting and clarifying information, @seth77.  I think this is a Geto-Dacian, but I really don't know - 

RR-DanubianCeltsDenarius(0).jpg.7a687dfb3f30f412dd12f4566b4cf4ce.jpg

Geto-Dacian (?) Imitation Roman Republic Denarius L. Papius (c. 79 B.C.) Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; symbol behind (upside-down cauldron?) / Gryphon springing right; symbol below (knife?).  Sim. Crawford 384/1 (for symbols, see Plate LXVI 105); Papia 1.  (4.37 grams / 18 mm) eBay Nov. 2017 

 

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

A great theme, @ambr0zie, and certainly fitting for where you live!

Here are my coins that relate (or probably relate) to Dacia and/or the Dacian Wars.

Trajan AR Denarius, 106 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right; IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TRP COS V P P / Rev. Captive Dacian in peaked cap with wide brim, seated right on shield in mournful attitude with left elbow on raised left knee, and face resting in left hand; below, curved Dacian sword (falx) right; SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI. RIC II 219 (http://numismatics.org/ocre/results?q=RIC+II+Trajan+219); RSC II 529; Sear RCV II 3168 (obv. var.); BMCRE 175 (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_R-11584). 17 mm., 3.02 g., 6 h.

image.jpeg.db701670b5482d6a04dd5ca33b665b2f.jpeg

Trajan AR Denarius, AD 107 [Sear RCV II], Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P / Rev. Danuvius (the Danube), naked to waist, reclining with left elbow on rocks amidst reeds, looking right, cloak billowing out in circle behind head, right hand resting on ship behind him with prow in shape of bird’s head (swan?), COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC; in exergue, DANVVIVS. RIC II Trajan 100, RSC II 136 (ill. p. 88), Sear RCV II 3138 (ill. p. 102), BMCRE III 395. 19 mm., 3.05 g. Purchased from Silbury Coins, UK, Jan. 2022.*

image.jpeg.6a997719065b9347629f4579060817a0.jpeg

*According to Foss at p. 100 [Clive Foss, Roman Historical Coins (Seaby, London, 1990)], this coin (Foss, Trajan No. 22), together with two other types (RIC II 542-544 and RIC 556-569), commemorate the preparations for the second Dacian war in AD 106, including “crossing into Dacia by a bridge and with the aid of the god of the Danube who helped to overcome Dacia.” 

Trajan AR Denarius, AD 107-108, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P / Emperor standing in triumphal quadriga to right (decorated with image of Trajan standing left erecting trophy to right), holding branch with right hand extended and eagle-tipped scepter with left hand, COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC. RIC II 139 corr. (bust type); BMCRE III Trajan 349 at p. 78; RSC II 94; Sear RCV II 3131. Purchased Jan. 6, 2022 at Roma Numismatics E-Sale 93, Lot 974. 19 mm., 3.03 g., 6h.

image.jpeg.adba2e8cd29f1847b84003d85198a4f4.jpeg

Trajan AR denarius, AD 108-109, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate head right, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P / Rev. Dacian captive, wearing cloak and peaked cap, seated left on pile of arms in attitude of mourning; right elbow resting on raised right knee, and face resting on right hand; about him, two curved swords in front, two spears and an oblong shield behind; COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC around; in exergue, DAC CAP. RIC II 98; RSC II Trajan 120(a) (rev. ill. p. 87); see also Foss (Trajan No. 286(b) at p. 101). Black patina. Purchased from Herakles Numismatics, Jan. 2022, NYINC 2022. 19 mm., 3.05 g.

image.jpeg.4d365153b370e867905ceb1ae86c68d9.jpeg

Trajan AR Denarius, AD 108-109, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TRP / Rev. Dacian captive, wearing peaked cap, standing left with hands bound in front of pile of arms, including round shield to right, and, to left, two curved swords, two spears, and an oblong shield; COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC around; in exergue, DAC CAP. RIC II 99, RSC II Trajan 121 (ill. p. 87), Sear RCV II 3137 (ill. p. 101). 3.04 g. Purchased from Emporium Hamburg, Auction 100, 15 Nov. 2022, Lot 356.

image.jpeg.a282d8e6b53835410ec2c6867caad6aa.jpeg

Trajan AR Denarius, AD 113-114, Rome Mint. Obv. Laureate & draped bust right, seen from three-quarters behind; IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI PP / Rev. Trajan’s column, with spiral bands enclosing large dots on face, placed on decorated base with door in center, flanked by two eagles with beaks facing inwards, and surmounted by statue of Trajan standing facing, holding long scepter in left hand [right arm not visible]; SPQR OPTI-MO PRINCIPI. 17.5 mm., 3.06 g., 6 h. RIC II Trajan 293, RSC II Trajan 558 (laureate bust draped but rev. var.: OPTIMO rather than OPTI-MO), BMCRE III Trajan 455 & Pl. 17 No. 2 (laureate bust draped, OPTI-MO); Sear RCV 891 (3rd ed. 1981) [not in Millennium Edition]. Purchased from cgb.fr Internet Auction, 26 April 2022, Lot 95.

image.jpeg.46fec7c52dde7edde76ce224c38b842d.jpeg

Trajan Decius, AR Antoninianus, 249-250 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Radiate and cuirassed bust right, IMP C MA Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG / Rev. Dacia standing left, wearing cloak over left shoulder and, with right hand, holding Dacian battle-standard surmounted by Draco (dragon’s head or wolf’s head), D-A-CIA. RIC IV 12(b), RSC IV 16, Sear RCV III 9368. 22.28 mm., 4.09 g.

image.jpeg.ec36abfab704e8a755d934e18c60664a.jpeg

  • Like 10
  • Heart Eyes 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aurelian had a coinage to mark his reorganization of the Danube provinces in December 270 to January 271, before he ordered the retreat from transdanubian Dacia, to then reestablish Dacia Aureliana Felix south of the Danube with its new capital at Serdica.

 

aureliandf.JPG.ee8d5ce516dc1085de602ec8c1422d64.JPG

 

This coinage was likely done by the same die workers who had done the 'Aureolus' coinage in late 268 (and subsequently all the Mediolanum coinage of Claudius II Gothicus) and was reserved to a single issue at Mediolanum, to little to no circulation on the Danube. Aurelian's DACIA FELIX coinage is scarce overall.

And this is a pre-Burebista coinage that is readily available at most auction houses:

2090303_1627719353.jpg.c2ab1647872f353a5de2399dcc6eae43.jpg

Sattelkopfpferd (Varteju-Bucuresti) 'tetradrachm'

It's a 'tetradrachm' minted by the 'Piefiges' tribes (according to Preda) who resided around what is now the Romanian Plain and Bucharest (Ialomita-Vedea-Arges), between ca. 100 to 70s BC. This coinage is late in the series and it seems like once Burebista became ruler all 'Hellenistic' coinage north of Danube stopped and likely the new 'republican' variations started, perhaps as a nod to Rome itself. It's worth noting that the big money on the Danube at that time was not in republican denarii but Hellenistic tetradrachms and Mithridatic gold, so the introduction of 'republican' imitations could mean that a lot of the warlord elite from Transdanubia was already involved as foederati (or at the very least mercenary units) with the Roman military.

One of the main 'Dacian' minting centers around 100BC was at Malaia Kopania, in what is now the Carpathian region of Ukraine:

tetradrachm.jpg.c166a928de1bcb04c8c695e3e4d99a9d.jpg

 

Their coins circulated a lot in Pannonia and up to Raetia regions for a long time and the billon of which they were made drops in quality as the type gets past the 100BC ballpark. Preda assigns the type to the 'Costoboci' as 'Mediesu Aurit' type. A lot of these coins were offered at auctions in Poland in 2021, this one was offered by Lanz in September 2021.

 

Edited by seth77
  • Like 11
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is one that seems to be Scarce to Rare. Another somewhat random pickup from the great online flea market back in the day.

Hadrian, AD 117-138. Æ As (26mm, 8.16g, 6h). Struck AD 134-138. Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P; Bare headed bust of Hadrian, right, draped. Rev: D A-CIA; Dacia, wearing tunic and cloak, seated left on rock, holding standard, sloped upwards to left in right hand, and curved sword upwards in left hand, [SC] in ex. Ref: BMCRE 1741 (Pl 94, #13;  BMC Collection Online Museum Number R.8834 die match); RIC II.3 1663 (pictures the BM specimen). Very Fine, nice brown patina, SC on reverse off flan. BM example is 9.62g. Extremely Rare; rated R3 (highest rarity) by RIC II.3. One example on CoinArchives (Roma 96 (5 May 2022), Lot 1122 hammered for 480 GBP. Roma example is also a die match and is 10.45g).

image.jpeg.8bed1b79a6ad33ad70ac51624512c150.jpeg

  • Like 7
  • Heart Eyes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/29/2023 at 11:44 PM, ambr0zie said:

Let's see coins related to Dacia!

 

image.jpeg.87dad72312fc1ed428d21f8ceac8a4f7.jpeg

Marcus Ulpius Traianus as Imperator Caesar Nerva Traianus Augustus
Denarius of the Roman Imperial Period 103-111 AD; Material: Silver; Diameter: 19mm; Weight: 3.34g; Mint: Rome; Reference: RIC II Trajan 98

Obverse: Bust of Trajan, laureate, right. The Inscription reads: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P for Imperator Traiano Augustus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate (Imperator, of Trajan, Augustus, conqueror of the Germans, conqueror of the Dacians, high priest, holder of tribunician power); Reverse: Dacian seated left on a pile of arms in an attitude of mourning; round him, left and right, various arms. The Inscription reads: COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC DAC CAP for Consul Quintum, Pater Patriae, Senatus Populusque Romanus, Optimo Principi, Dacia Capta (Consul for the fifth time, father of the nation. The senate and the Roman people. The best of princes. Conquest of Dacia).

 

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...