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I think we need our own 'Post an Old Coin and and an Old Tune' thread


JeandAcre

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To continue the fool theme is an 80´s "hair metal band", Cinderella. They were recommended to a record company by Jon Bon Jovi.

I don´t think Vespasian was anybodys foll

Vespasian Denarius, RIC 360, (RIC [1962] 50), RSC 574, BMC 71 SEAR 2316
IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right / VES-TA to either side of Vesta standing left, holding simpulum & scepter.

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Edited by expat
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This hasn't been reposted for a short minute, at least.  It's my only brakteat that's either from the initial, 12th-century phase, or of the corresponding, larger module.  Both bases covered.  (...It's now the background of the home screen on my desktop.  That happened by accident, but I  never found occasion to argue.)

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Bishopric of Magdeburg.  Wichmann von Seeburg, 1152-1192.

St. Maurice, haloed. holding a palm frond (traditional symbol of martyrdom) and a (funly Patriarchal) cross.  +SC-S MAVRICIVS . DVX.  (The last not a title, but a more generalized medieval Latin honorific for an accomplished soldier; likely following Classical Latin precedent, but I'm already in over my head.  I guess they thought that martyrdom (c. Diocletian) could be its own accomplishment.)

And this just happens to be the first reading of the Pachelbel Kanon that I ever heard. 

-->Yes, with only, what, two Baroque violins, a Baroque cello, and a chamber organ doing most of the continuo.  Regarding the forces, this will always be informed minimalism at its very best.  As with so many first versions of anything I heard (Mahalia Jackson, 'How I Got Over' at the Apollo Theater immediately comes to mind), it's never stopped being my favorite.  Sweet music for chaotic times.

 

 

Edited by JeandAcre
Just, 'end parentheses.'
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With apologies for the scale of the seller’s pics; I was still learning how even to reproduce them.  A lot of this is lifted directly from an epic-length document going back to the late 20-oughts, which, apart from random excerpts like this, has never seen the light of day.
C:\Users\alan\Pictures\IIIb,OXFORD,obv.jpg

C:\Users\alan\Pictures\III B OX 1 REV.jpg

King John with an unsteady crown, depicted in a manuscript of 'Abbreviatio chronicorum Angliae', an abridged version of the chronicle of Matthew Paris, produced in St Albans 1250-59

Henry III, AR penny of Oxford, long cross type, Class IIIb, c. 1248-1250.  (Weakness of strike obscuring some elements of the legends and designs.)
Obv.  Henry facing, crowned.
*hEN2ICV[S RE]X III’  (“HENRICVS REX III[VS];” King Henry III[rd]).  
Rev.  Voided long cross, three pellets in each angle.  
[From 1 o’clock:]  A)A [/] MO\I [/  O]XO [/] NFO  (“ADAM ON OXONFO[RD];” Adam [Feteplace, moneyer] in Oxford).
North 987 (and p. 228 for mint and moneyer); Spink (2009) 1363 (and p. 147 for mint and moneyer); Stewartby pp. 82-3, 86 (for mint and moneyer).
This example provides an amusing evocation of political developments within a few years of its issue.  Relative to the alignment of the eyes and nose (although not the initial star in the legend), Henry’s crown seems to be slightly askew.  (Of this class, North notes only that the portrait is “usually of coarse work.”  See p. 226, entry for 987 /Class 3b.)  
A contemporary instance of similar visual rhetoric (below) is found in a manuscript illustration of Henry's father, King John.  (Matthew Paris, Abbreviatio chronicorum Angliae, 1250-59.  Picture from the website for the UK magazine, History Today: http://www.historytoday.com/graham-e-seel/good-king-john.)  
Funly, the University of Oxford was granted a royal charter in 1248 –by, yep, our guy here.  
…In case you can’t manage the suspense, Nope, never went there.  My real ‘old schools,’ including a very nominal state university, where I pursued a fictional graduate program before giving up in despair, were on a level below the ones mentioned here.  But I can readily share the sentiment.

 

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The Roman Republic
L. Procilius. Denarius, AR 3.48 g. Laureate head of Jupiter r.; behind, S•C. Rev. L•PROCILI / F Juno Sospita standing r., holding shield and hurling spear; at her feet, snake. Babelon Procilia 1. Sydenham 771. RBW 1406. Crawford 379/1.

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Let's keep it celestial...

 

 

Macedonian Kingdom, Reign of Perseus

171-170 BC
AR Drachm (15mm, 2.81g)
Uncertain mint in Thessaly
Hermios magistrate.
O: Head of Helios facing 3/4 right, hair loose.
R: Rose with bud on right; I-Ω to either side of stem, EPMIAΣ (magistrate) above.
Price, Larissa p. 241; SNG Keckman 795; Sear 5092
ex Jack H. Beymer

Originating from the Sitichoro, Thessaly hoard of 1968, the long held attribution for this pseudo-Rhodian series was 'Rhodian Peraia' or 'Islands off Karia', etc, and probably used to pay mercenaries. This was the attribution I bought the coin with, and it served for nearly twenty years.
However a 1988 article by Richard Ashton claims these coins were actually issued by Perseus of Macedon during the Third Macedonian War to pay his Cretan mercenaries in a coin which was familiar to them, that is, the classic 'Helios/Rose' coinage of Rhodes. This is the attribution I use today.
Selene Psoma further suggests an even more specific location based on style and weight standard, pinpointing this issue in Thasian Peraia, so it will be interesting to see what further study may reveal.

~ Peter 

Helios_Rose.jpeg.jpg

Edited by Phil Anthos
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ANTONINUS PIUS AR Denarius CONSECRATIO
 DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right on garlanded altar, head turned left. RSC 156. BMC 48. SEAR 5192.
RIC 431 (Aurelius). Rome mint, after AD 161. 3,0 g - 18,5 mm

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Edited by expat
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Okay, some more Clapton.  Now I can't stop myself.

http://historiccoinage.com/collection/images/coins/73693WX,Aq,obv.JPGhttp://historiccoinage.com/collection/images/coins/72369WX,Aq,rev.JPG
Guillaume X, Duc d’Aquitaine 1126-1137.
AR denier of Bordeaux (variant without annulet).
Obv.  Cruciform arrangement of 4 crosslets.
+[-IVILILEMO  (‘GVILILEMO;’ a blundered rendering of ‘Guilielmo,’ Guillaume).
Rev.  Cross.
+BVRDIC-IIILA  (‘BVRDIGII[--V/A]LA;’ Bordeaux).
Boudeau 464, Duplessy 1020, Poey d’Avant 2733, Roberts 4311.

And, thank you, some Clapton.

 

 

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Very cool, @expat.  You have some real expertise (to which I only aspire on a good day) in integrating the coin and the tune.  And this time, it's topical!  That has to get you a slew more points. 

After this, I feel like shooting out a suitably expansive 'Happy Valentine's Day!' to anyone in the market for one.

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For Valentine's Day, I bring you The Brighter Side of Darkness. 

 

Of course, I have to post Venus and Cupid.

[IMG]
Julia Mamaea, AD 222-235.
Roman AR denarius, 3.36 g, 20.1 mm, 6 h.
Rome, AD 223, third emission.
Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, draped bust, right, wearing stephane.
Rev: VENVS GENETRIX SC, Venus standing left, holding apple in extended right hand and vertical scepter in left hand; at feet, Cupid standing right, reaching upwards.
Refs: RIC 355; BMCRE 152-3; Cohen 72; RCV 8215; CRE 509.

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After that, it's like, Oh, no, what coin could go with this.  It'll have to be a repost.

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Marguerite, heiress of Flanders, whose marriage to Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut made him the VIIIth of Flanders.  Petit denier of, well, Flanders; this cites an older reference that doesn't venture a mint town.  C. later 12th c.  Obv. (in field:) M; rev. +SIMON (the moneyer, comparable to contemporary Anglo-Norman practice).  Ghyssens p. 61 and (185,) Plate I; no. 118a.

And the only Al Green song that's better than the one that gets played at weddings, and elicited a vicariously embarrassing rendition by Obama.

 

 

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As the Greek mythological tale goes, after cutting the head off Medusa and using it to win several confrontations, Perseus finally gives the head to Athena. She attaches it as the central boss of her war shield.

Alexander III of Macedon, AE15. Salamis Mint, Cyprus, struck c. 323 - 315 BC, Facing gorgon with lolling tongue at center of ornamented Macedonian shield with alternate 5 pellets and double crescents. / B-A to left and right of Macedonian helmet, caduceus below left. Price 3158.

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21 minutes ago, Phil Anthos said:

Cool reverse.  🙂

Michael Jackson sang on that song. I believe he may have produced the album as well, but age is tasking my memory.

~ Peter 

"Rockwell" was the stage name of Kennedy Gordy. His Father was Berry Gordy, boss of Motown. It was Kennedy´s idea to invite Michael Jackson to participate on the single. The album it is from was co-produced by Rockwell and Curtis Anthony Nolen.

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I worked at a record store when this came out. I was supposed to play the hits in the store to encourage sales, but the Dr. Johnny Fever in me just couldn't do it. So I played what I liked and hoped the boss didn't come in.

Most of what I played was most definitely not commercial, but I played Rockwell. I still hear it on the radio occasionally. 

~ Peter 

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So much to say here...

Perinthos, Thrace

Pseudo-autonomous
Circa 3rd century AD
AE26 (6.56g)
O: Veiled bust of Demeter right, gazing at poppy in hand.
R: Artemis Tauropolis (Hekate?) advancing right, holding two torches; ΠEPINTIΩN, ΔIΣNEΩKOPON around.
Moushmov 4386v; RPC III 722
ex Civitas Galleries

This poor coin, common and worn, is one of my favorites from my entire collection. I have a small sub-collection of Veiled Goddess coins, mostly of Demeter, but none of them have the forlorn expression which so captures a mother's grief over Her lost daughter like this one. With the poppy in hand the Eleusinian connection seems strong enough to make me suspect Hekate as the reverse figure.

Kate Bush is a goddess in my eyes too. I fell in love when I saw her on SNL in 1979, and my wife understood before we got married that Kate was my 'free pass'. This song reminds me of her.

Copy_of_Perinthos_Demeter.jpeg~2.jpg

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@Phil Anthos Reminds me of when I used to DJ on a Friday and Saturday night at our pub. I had to play what I liked now and again or I would have lost my sanity. Which leads me to tell a small story. One of the songs I liked to play, for me, Milk and alcohol by Dr. Feelgood. I had the single in white vinyl. Move on to mid eighties and I met the band and their manager in London. On to the present time, we had a new client come to our insurance agency office to insure his villa and car. It was no other than the manager of Dr. Feelgood. Still their manager, even though there are no original members of the band left. Another 5 years and he will have been managing them for 50 years. Incredible.

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Alright, let's grind!

Ephesus, Ionia

390-320 BC
AR Diobol (10mm, 1.02g)
O: Bee with straight wings, within dotted border.
R: Confronted heads of two stags; EΦ above.
SNG Cop 242-43; SNG von Aulock 1835; SNG München 32; Sear 4375v; BMC Ionia 53, 53
ex Forvm Ancient Coins

 

 

Ephesus_AR.jpeg.jpg

Edited by Phil Anthos
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