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I think we need our own 'Post an Old Coin and and an Old Tune' thread


JeandAcre
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To my shame, I've yet to invite Stevex6 to the forum.  Stupid me.  But it was a brilliant thread.  (Oh, Expletive of Choice, I guess he was another casualty of ...well, you're likely to smell where the smoke is coming from.)

If you need some rules ...well, trust me (if you have to), you don't.  Just, any old coin, and any old tune, with or without the pretense of a connection between the two.

Given which, here's what I felt like starting with.  

image.thumb.jpeg.06ad5c269cab1c22d4f7ece3dd5fe3a5.jpeg

This is the first, and easily the best, of my imitations of Ayyubiid dirhams, from Frankish /Crusader Acre.  The guy who sold it to me (on ebay, back when it, like the internet in general, was actually About something) was a grad student at some very impressive school in New England.  ...Or other.  Accordingto folks like Metcalf and Malloy, the primary way you can distinguish the Frankish imitations from the Ayyubid originals is that the dates are always posthumous, relative to the sultans' names.  And Yes, the Franks had been there long enough to be that literate in Arabic.  ...Which I kind of need, for one because I'm pretty emphatically not.  (As in, more emphatically than pretty.)  The graduate student dated this one to an AH date corresponding to 1217 CE.

Here are a couple of tunes demonstrating a comparable dynamic.  First, Jelly-Roll Morton, 'Jelly Roll Blues,' recorded by the composer himself, from what has to be the best piano roll extant.  Followed by a creditable reading of a typical French Baroque chaconne.  See if you can tell how closely they resemble eachother, just structurally, along the lines of a series of dance-based variations.  ...Morton has gotten into lots of trouble, once he died and couldn't defend himself, for allegedly overemphasizing his light-skinnededness.  But even when he said (direct quote ...I think), 'all my peoples were Frenchmens,' he just might have been saying as little as, 'all my peoples were Francophones.'

 

Followed by this chaconne:

 

 

Edited by JeandAcre
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4 hours ago, JeandAcre said:

To my shame, I've yet to invite Stevex6 to the forum.  Stupid me.  But it was a brilliant thread.  (Oh, Expletive of Choice, I guess he was another casualty of ...well, you're likely to smell where the smoke is coming from.)

If you need some rules ...well, trust me (if you have to), you don't.  Just, any old coin, and any old tune, with or without the pretense of a connection between the two.

Given which, here's what I felt like starting with.  

image.thumb.jpeg.06ad5c269cab1c22d4f7ece3dd5fe3a5.jpeg

This is the first, and easily the best, of my imitations of Ayyubiid dirhams, from Frankish /Crusader Acre.  The guy who sold it to me (on ebay, back when it, like the internet in general, was actually About something) was a grad student at some very impressive school in New England.  ...Or other.  Accordingto folks like Metcalf and Malloy, the primary way you can distinguish the Frankish imitations from the Ayyubid originals is that the dates are always posthumous, relative to the sultans' names.  And Yes, the Franks had been there long enough to be that literate in Arabic.  ...Which I kind of need, for one because I'm pretty emphatically not.  (As in, more emphatically than pretty.)  The graduate student dated this one to an AH date corresponding to 1217 CE.

Here are a couple of tunes demonstrating a comparable dynamic.  First, Jelly-Roll Morton, 'Jelly Roll Blues,' recorded by the composer himself, from what has to be the best piano roll extant.  Followed by a creditable reading of a typical French Baroque chaconne.  See if you can tell how closely they resemble eachother, just structurally, along the lines of a series of dance-based variations.  ...Morton has gotten into lots of trouble, once he died and couldn't defend himself, for allegedly overemphasizing his light-skinnededness.  But even when he said (direct quote ...I think), 'all my peoples were Frenchmens,' he just might have been saying as little as, 'all my peoples were Francophones.'

 

Followed by this chaconne:

 

 

I invited SteveX6 last week. He said he is no longer collecting, but may check us out. I told to come on over to just have some FUN!

Edited by Alegandron
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This one depicts the apotheosis of Faustina the Younger.

Faustina Jr CONSECRATIO S C Eagle flying left sestertius.jpg

Diva Faustina II, AD 147-175.
Roman orichalcum sestertius, 25.23 g, 30.2 mm, 11 h.
Rome, early AD 176.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, veiled and draped bust, right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO S C, Faustina II carried by an eagle flying left, holding transverse scepter in her right hand and with veil decorated with stars floating above her head.
Ref: RIC 1701; BMC 1572; Cohen 68; RCV 5226; MIR –; Cayón p.153, 32.

 

 

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Listen to Leo Sayer's lyrics... I think this appropriate for recent experiences in a past Coin Site... 

And, hey, Three Dog Night is always good!

 

 

North Africa

[IMG]
Carthage - Zeugitana
AV 1/10th Stater-Shekel
350-320 BCE
0.94g 7.5mm
Palm-
Horse Head
SNG COP 132

Edited by Alegandron
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5 hours ago, JeandAcre said:

To my shame, I've yet to invite Stevex6 to the forum.  Stupid me.  But it was a brilliant thread.  (Oh, Expletive of Choice, I guess he was another casualty of ...well, you're likely to smell where the smoke is coming from.)

If you need some rules ...well, trust me (if you have to), you don't.  Just, any old coin, and any old tune, with or without the pretense of a connection between the two.

Given which, here's what I felt like starting with.  

image.thumb.jpeg.06ad5c269cab1c22d4f7ece3dd5fe3a5.jpeg

This is the first, and easily the best, of my imitations of Ayyubiid dirhams, from Frankish /Crusader Acre.  The guy who sold it to me (on ebay, back when it, like the internet in general, was actually About something) was a grad student at some very impressive school in New England.  ...Or other.  Accordingto folks like Metcalf and Malloy, the primary way you can distinguish the Frankish imitations from the Ayyubid originals is that the dates are always posthumous, relative to the sultans' names.  And Yes, the Franks had been there long enough to be that literate in Arabic.  ...Which I kind of need, for one because I'm pretty emphatically not.  (As in, more emphatically than pretty.)  The graduate student dated this one to an AH date corresponding to 1217 CE.

Here are a couple of tunes demonstrating a comparable dynamic.  First, Jelly-Roll Morton, 'Jelly Roll Blues,' recorded by the composer himself, from what has to be the best piano roll extant.  Followed by a creditable reading of a typical French Baroque chaconne.  See if you can tell how closely they resemble eachother, just structurally, along the lines of a series of dance-based variations.  ...Morton has gotten into lots of trouble, once he died and couldn't defend himself, for allegedly overemphasizing his light-skinnededness.  But even when he said (direct quote ...I think), 'all my peoples were Frenchmens,' he just might have been saying as little as, 'all my peoples were Francophones.'

 

Followed by this chaconne:

 

 

I always though Harpsichord was cool music.  The plucking of the strings vs. a velvet hammer gave a cool sound.

Edited by Alegandron
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A coin of Gallienus honouring Bacchus...

image.thumb.jpeg.79af48bf918bb0ac9dfd3de92700eb71.jpeg

This is a great band with amazing singers, that does not have a lot of recognition, for those of you who enjoy neoclassical stuff in the vein of Dead Can Dance and others... I recommend you "Lacrime di Gioia", but this track is great too and was fitting the coin.

Edited by Lhevae
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5 hours ago, Alegandron said:

I always though Harpsichord was cool music.  The plucking of the strings vs. a velvet hammer gave a cool sound.

My favorite thing about harpsichord has to be the bass you can get from a good instrument with appropriate tuning, as in that reading.  The French composers especially --Couperin le Grand, for another-- could get amazing, often enough really poignant effects with it.  ...The caveat is that even the earlier 'original instruments' players frequently used modern, higher tuning.  ...Just not as good.

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22 minutes ago, Helvius Pertinax said:

Glad to see this thread revived! Ill just post my favourite coin, along with my favourite tune.

20220525_191955.thumb.jpg.cbc4a59468be02442f5e6f636b5ba4ea.jpg

Siglos, type IIIa, 495-475 BCE, Darius I - Xerxes I

Epic performance!!

Terrific, even (or especially?) for people who don't do much Prokofiev.  But what is that ms. leaf your (solid) siglos is on?  Has a vaguely 17th-century look to it, but I can't even figure out what language it is!

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6 minutes ago, JeandAcre said:

Terrific, even (or especially?) for people who don't do much Prokofiev.  But what is that ms. leaf your (solid) siglos is on?  Has a vaguely 17th-century look to it, but I can't even figure out what language it is!

Thanks! Im not that much into Prokofiev either personally. But when my classmates blast out Eminem music i just silently slide in my headphones and listen to this tune 🙂 I made a post on these pics, took them last week. Im in an internship at an archive right now, used one of the documents as background. Its german, from the 1830s.

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...Right, so I was only only off by about a century and a half.  No big deal....  And I promise you, it almost had a Slavic look to me.  I guess the language that gave us Fraktur had equally idiomatic conventions (--from here) where handwriting was concerned.

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[IMG]
Faustina II, AD 147-175.
Roman oricalchum sestertius, 22.36 gm, 33.7 mm, 12 h.
Rome, December AD 160.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: FECVND AVGVSTAE S C, (Faustina as) Fecunditas standing left, between two children (thought to represent Faustina III and Lucilla), holding two infants in her arms (thought to represent Fadilla and Cornificia).
Refs: RIC 1635; BMCRE 902-904; Cohen 96; Strack 1336; RCV 5273; MIR 10.

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7 minutes ago, Roman Collector said:

 

[IMG]
Faustina II, AD 147-175.
Roman oricalchum sestertius, 22.36 gm, 33.7 mm, 12 h.
Rome, December AD 160.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: FECVND AVGVSTAE S C, (Faustina as) Fecunditas standing left, between two children (thought to represent Faustina III and Lucilla), holding two infants in her arms (thought to represent Fadilla and Cornificia).
Refs: RIC 1635; BMCRE 902-904; Cohen 96; Strack 1336; RCV 5273; MIR 10.

Tragedy of her passing... really liked her voice!

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[IMG]
Plautilla, AD 202-205.
Roman AR denarius, 3.40 g, 17.80 mm, 12 h.
Rome, AD 202.
Obv: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, right; hair firmly waved and drawn down on neck.
Rev: CONCORDIA FELIX, Caracalla, togate, standing left, clasping right hands with Plautilla, draped, standing right.
Refs: RIC 365b; BMCRE5 418; RSC 12; RCV 7066; Hill 584, 586; CRE 433.
Notes: The British Museum incorrectly cross-references 418 to RIC 365a.
 
 
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image.thumb.jpeg.775d7d46a58765e0534b2b68f5c2c479.jpeg

Marcus Aurelius, 161-180 AD.
Æ Sestertius, 24.52 g, 32.0 mm, 12 h.
Struck under Commodus.
Rome mint, 180 AD.
Obv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS; Head of Marcus Aurelius, bare, right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO S C; Eagle, flying right, grasping thunderbolt in talons, and bearing on its back Marcus Aurelius, holding sceptre.
Refs: RIC 660, Sear RCV 5984.
Acquired from Classical Numismatic Group, Electronic Auction 487, Lot 589, 10 March 2021.

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  • Benefactor

Hey, thanks for the invite!!

=> sweet idea for a thread!!

 

AWOLNATION - Burn It Down (Official Video) - Bing video

 

CARTHAGE Æ20 (below)

Circa 300-264 BC

Diameter: 20 mm

Weight: 4.79 grams

Obverse: Wreathed head of Tanit left

Reverse: Horse’s head right; palm tree before, pellet below

Reference: MAA 57m; SNG Copenhagen 175

Other: 7h … brown patina with some light earthen deposits

Ex-stevex6

 

carthage.jpg

Edited by Steve
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Between Carthage and Libya
[IMG]

Carthage-LIBYAN UPRISING - Mercenaries issue
Mercenary War 241-238 BCE
7.36g AR DiShekel
Herakles Head in Lion's Head-
Lion walking; Punic M above; LIBYA below
R SNG Cop 240f
Overstrike
Coins were struck in the name of Libya and "M", which has been taken as either "machanat" - the Camp (of the mercenaries), or perhaps Matho, their leader

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605067253_DomnaVENERIVICTRSestertius.thumb.jpg.e0efbb14e50e0deb8d6af3ada97e81d9.jpg

Julia Domna, AD 193-217.
Roman oricalchum sestertius, 21.41 gm, 28.8 mm.
Rome, AD 194, issue 4.
Obv: JULIA DOMNA AVG, bare-headed and draped bust, r.
Rev: VENERI VICTR SC, Venus, naked to waist, standing r., holding apple and palm, resting l. elbow on column.
RIC-842; BMCRE-488; Cohen-195; Sear-6631; Hill-113.

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Like I need another one of these laying around!

2897292_1653466299.l.jpg.a29689b2ae70fab40c0d2036fc7763d4.jpg

(That felt dirty. When I went to add the image it made me insert it🍆)

But to the ancient Romans these brought good luck. Like our modern rabbits foot or four leaf clitorus. 

It was going cheap so I picked up a little snack. Oh, wait. Don't post that! That's not what I meant!!!

 

 

Edited by Ryro
Roman Collector made me post this
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