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Newest Nerva and Cool Goddess


LONGINUS
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Posted (edited)

I had a Nerva denarius of this type a few years ago but in a moment of poor decision making,

I decided to sell it. This one surpasses it’s predecessor on many levels.

 

image.jpeg.63a2de3b994031c27d8d03a5fe3b0a0d.jpeg

On a related topic —  here are my denarii featuring Concordia. She’s one of my favorite Roman deities.

I like to think of her as the goddess of getting along.

 

image.jpeg.7432bccb04ae791079d5befcc143ba54.jpeg

image.jpeg.d0a8aa0a329a066b92bb87a102bfaffc.jpeg

 

Feel free to post your experiences relating to replacing your lost, stolen, sold, or just misplaced coins.

and / or

Coins featuring your favorite gods and goddesses.

Edited by LONGINUS
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Excellent coin(s) and info, as always. But I also have to say: From a visual standpoint (meaning layout and presentation), your posts are great. Always enjoy looking at them. As someone who has taught design for more than thirty years, I appreciate the aesthetic consideration you devote to your posts. Well done.

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Wonderful coins and great displays, Ray! Your denarii collection is really developing quite nicely.

I have never sold a coin before so I have never had to replace an example I used to own. I have given some coins away as gifts but I have never regretted doing so. Sometimes I have a duplicate and sometimes not. I suppose I’ll “replace” some of the gifted coins with new examples at some point. Cant think of an instance where I have done so yet.

Here are my favorite Nerva and Concordia denarii in honor of your awesome additions DRay.

B5D9EA64-13FB-4658-B5D2-AA7213478317.jpeg.495d13b9360374b133a44168859fb448.jpeg

Roman Empire
Nerva (AD 96-98)
AR Denarius, Rome mint, struck October AD 97
Dia.: 17 mm
Wt.: 3.47 g
Obv.: IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P II COS III PP; Laureate bust right
Rev.: SALVS PVBLICA; Salus, seated left, holding grain ears
Ref.: RIC II 20 

 

9FB51ECD-7A55-4DA3-A372-08788DA6AB24.jpeg.8503819261b7d95a70572a275c7f46ea.jpeg

Roman Empire 
Faustina I
AR Denarius, Rome mint, struck AD 139-140
Dia.: 18 mm
Wt.: 2.77 g
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA; Draped bust right.
Rev.: CONCORDIA AVG; Concordia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
Ref.: RIC 335 (Antoninus Pius)
Ex Collection of a Hanseatic Roman-friend. Ex Auktion Münzzentrum 94, Lot 420 (Cologne; May 13, 1998)

 

Edited by Curtisimo
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Posted · Benefactor
Posted (edited)

Longinus => congrats on replacing that great coin-type (your OP-coin is a total winner!)

image.gif.46461cc5d5281fda59139ba18c1b5cd7.gif

I only had one Nerva example, but it was one of my favourite coins (batter-up!!)

 

Nerva Club.jpg

 

I didn't realize until now that I had so many Cool-Concordia examples (fun, thanks for the heads-up!)

=> Vitellius, Julia Paula, Orbiana, Otacilia Severa, Severina and Probus ... 

 

Vitellius (below)

Vitellius AR Denarius.jpg

 

Julia Paula (below)

Julia Paula AR Denarius.jpg

 

Orbiana (below)

Orbiana.jpg

 

Otacilia Severa (below)

otac a.jpg

otac b.jpg

 

Severina (below)

Severina Antoninianus.JPG

 

Probus (below)

probusaa.jpg

probusbb.jpg

 

(sorry for the poor photography ... sadly, I never caught the shutter-bug)

 

... hey, congrats again on your sweet collection (thanks for sharing)

 

 

Edited by Steve
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Nerva Ae Sestertius 97 AD Obv Head right laureate Rv Fortuna standing left holding rudder and cornucopia RIC 83  28.47 grms 33 mm Photo by W. Hansennervas1.jpg.1502df97f7b43e75eb855d894c1e3be3.jpg

Sandwiched as he is between the last of the 12 Caesars and Trajan   Nerva does get rather short shrift. However I have always found his portraits to be quite interesting. He has a very thin face his skin stretched taught over the boney substructure all perched on a rather long neck. He has a full head of curly hair as well as a large aquiline nose. This image is the more striking when you compare it to that of Domitian. 

Edited by kapphnwn
word change
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Beautiful coins, everyone!  Here's my "clasped hands" Nerva (CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM) denarius:

image.jpeg.56f58a9f2600ac51af562a934a270ea5.jpeg

Some Concordias issued for various empresses, most of them with rather similar reverses -- the only major difference being whether the personification stands or sits:

Sabina:

image.jpeg.3b00785e77203802f35c511cb9d82c8b.jpeg

Faustina I (lifetime)

image.jpeg.54b32a4b69046b3604150d8d8bb1f2ed.jpeg

Lucilla

image.jpeg.3c8eecc158592c901788c039a0839fb4.jpeg

Julia Paula

image.jpeg.85faffdbeb5c15bc956b4ffa3153ab6c.jpeg

Aquilia Severa

image.jpeg.486dff40194c85e1f29ec2cace4c785f.jpeg

Sallustia Orbiana

image.jpeg.f771116e9c12cfe5032da967e41a1828.jpeg

Otacilia Severa

image.jpeg.b8c2c49dac0f8d49f90f75f90b4b3324.jpeg

 

 

 

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Posted · Supporter
3 hours ago, kapphnwn said:

Nerva Ae Sestertius 97 AD Obv Head right laureate Rv Fortuna standing left holding rudder and cornucopia RIC 83  28.47 grms 33 mm Photo by W. Hansennervas1.jpg.1502df97f7b43e75eb855d894c1e3be3.jpg

Sandwiched as he is between the last of the 12 Caesars and Trajan   Nerva does get rather short shrift. However I have always found his portraits to be quite interesting. He has a very thin face his skin stretched taught over the boney substructure all perched on a rather long neck. He has a full head of curly hair as well as a large hooked nose. This image is the more striking when you compare it to that of Domitian. 

I agree that Nerva doesn't get the credit he deserves, probably due to his short reign and being overshadowed by his successor. Whether or not he was involved in the plot to assassinate Domitian, he came to power and was known for his temperance, fairness, and sense of propriety (all of which were sharply lacking in his predecessor.)

Among other things, Nerva released those who were on trial for maiestas - ostensibly, the crime of acting in a way that degraded the Roman name, but which quickly became a catch-all charge for practically anything the emperor didn't like - employed with carefree abandon by Domitian. Nerva also (in a more conservative vein) forbade servants from conspiring and accusing their masters, which had been encouraged under Domitian and which was wreaking havoc in Roman society. Nerva also forbade that gold statues be made in his honor, he restored to many their property which had been confiscated under Domitian.

He may have been older, but the man had nerve (pun unintended but welcome) - being made known of a senatorial conspiracy against him, Nerva had the two leaders of the conspiracy sit beside him at the public games (they were unaware that he knew of the plot.) Nerva then had the cool to hand the pair a couple of swords, "just to check and make sure that they were sharp", as a part of the ceremony, but also sending them a subtle yet powerful message that he knew and did not fear their disloyalty.

And of course, one of the last acts of Nerva as emperor was to appoint his successor, Marcus Ulpius Trajanus. In doing this, he broke from the vaguely hereditary system of dynastic succession which had been unofficially adopted by Augustus, and instead, not wishing to appear guilty of favoritism, chose to nominate a successor based solely on merit. Not only was his choice a great one for the Roman Empire, but he also set the precedent for what many have called the most humane and peaceful era of the Empire - the time of the Adoptive Emperors.

Hats off to Nerva is about what it amounts to! 

 

 

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Lovely denarius, @LONGINUS! Here's a Concordia without the aquila or prow.

[IMG]
Nerva, AD 96-98.
Roman AR denarius, 3.21 g, 18.5 mm, 7 h.
Rome, January - September, AD 97.
Obv: IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head, right.
Rev: CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM, clasped hands.
Refs: RIC 14; BMCRE 25-26; Cohen/RSC 20; RCV 3020; CBN 15.

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59 minutes ago, Roman Collector said:

 without the aquila or prow.

But with an obverse that has the champion nose among all the noses posted here!

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Posted · Administrator
8 hours ago, CPK said:

He may have been older, but the man had nerve (pun unintended but welcome) - being made known of a senatorial conspiracy against him, Nerva had the two leaders of the conspiracy sit beside him at the public games (they were unaware that he knew of the plot.) Nerva then had the cool to hand the pair a couple of swords, "just to check and make sure that they were sharp", as a part of the ceremony, but also sending them a subtle yet powerful message that he knew and did not fear their disloyalty.

 

 

I have never heard of this story before, and it paints quite a different picture of my view of Nerva. From The History of Rome podcast I always thought Nerva was a push over- a competent bureaucrat no doubt, but sort of spineless as emperor. This completely flips that notion on its head! 

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Great coins everyone. Here is a Concordia with clasped hands reverse (one of my favorite reverse types) from an emperor you wouldn't normally expect

image.png.f7f8a0e067308bdd3904f65e6b3c3fb4.png

Gallienus AD 253-268. Rome
Antoninianus AR
22 mm, 1,99 g
RIC V Gallienus (joint reign) 131, Cohen 125
Date: AD 253
IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, Bust of Gallienus, radiate, draped, right / CONCORDIA AVGG, two right hands clasped together

Another interesting one, at least for me, has the portrait of Honorius and a Concordia reverse legend but the character is Constantinople.

 

image.png.57dbe453a93f4e229053373f62b51ee9.png

Honorius AD 393-423. Cyzicus

Follis Æ

18 mm, 2,63 g

401-403 AD

D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, bust of Honorius, helmeted, pearl-diademed, cuirassed, facing front, holding spear in right hand behind head and shield decorated with cross on left arm / CONCORDI-A AVGG, Constantinopolis, helmeted, draped, enthroned, enthroned, facing front, head right, holding long sceptre in right hand and Victory on globe in left hand; beneath her right foot, prow.

RIC X Arcadius 95

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35 minutes ago, ambr0zie said:

Another interesting one, at least for me, has the portrait of Honorius and a Concordia reverse legend but the character is Constantinople.

I have an AE3 from his father, Theodosius I, that also has a Concordia reverse legend combined with the figure of Constantinopolis. Perhaps it was seen as a bit less pagan?

Theodosius I, AE3 (Sear: Centenionalis), AD 379-383 [Emperor AD 379-395], Alexandria mint, 3rd Officina. Obv. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG - Diademed (Pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right /  Rev. CONCORDIA AVGGG - Constantinopolis, helmeted, seated facing on throne, head right, holding spear and globe, right foot on prow. ALE(Γ) [gamma] in exergue. RIC IX 11 (p. 300), Sear RCV V 20535. 17.72 mm, 1.9 g.

image.jpeg.681e56e5c42abf943d6aa87e91b09c2d.jpeg

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I own a “handshake” denarius without the Aquila:

image.jpeg.4a5805684af0fb700226071183d31502.jpeg

Nerva. 96-98 AD. AR Denarius (17mm, 3.23 gm, 6h). Struck 97 AD. Obv:. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P II COS III P P, Laur. head of Nerva to right. Rev: CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM Clasped hands. RIC 26,RSC 22.

Ex. Akropolis Coins

Edited by MrMonkeySwag96
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@LONGINUS...Super looking coins and as always wonderfully displayed. 

Here's my nose....

7787660_1-image00785(1).jpg.5fe91754bdb0128111a002a7373582fe.jpg

Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 97.
Obverse..IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR POT, laureate head right
Reverse..COS III PATER PATRIAE, Priestly emblems: simpulum, aspergillum, guttus, and lituus.
RIC 24; RSC 48. 3.12g, 17mm, 6h.
Near Very Fine.
 

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  • 2 weeks later...

My one and only Nerva, Great Nose

Silver coin (AR Denarius) minted at Rome during the reign of NERVA in 97 A.D. Obv. IMP.NERVA.CAES.AVG.TR.P.COS.III.P.P.: laur, hd. r. Rev. FORTVNA.AVGVST.: Fortuna stg. l., holding rudder and cornucopia. RCS #953. RSCII #66 pg. 79. RICII #16 pg. 224. DVM #8. RCVSII #3025.

 

CA-211 OBV.jpg

CA-211 REV.jpg

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On 7/19/2022 at 3:03 AM, Restitutor said:

I have never heard of this story before, and it paints quite a different picture of my view of Nerva. From The History of Rome podcast I always thought Nerva was a push over- a competent bureaucrat no doubt, but sort of spineless as emperor. This completely flips that notion on its head! 

Restitutor, I love Nerva also. He also contributed some early steps towards building the social safety net--measures that the other "good emperors" would expand on.

But about choosing his successor, my understanding was that this was essentially forced on him. Of course, we are glad he went along with it!

Edited by NathanB
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