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What is your "worst" coin, and why do you like it?


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CILICIA. Anazarbus. Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus.(161-169). Ae.

Obv : СЄΒΑС ΑΝΤΩΝЄΙΝΟV ΚΑΙ ΟVΗΡ ΟΜΟΝΟΙΑ.
Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus standing facing one another, clasping hands and each holding scroll.

Rev : ΚΑΙ ΤΩΝ ΠΡΟС ΤΩ ΑΝΑΖΑΡ / ЄΤ ΒΠΡ.
Decastyle temple, with star in pediment.
RPC IV online 3647.

Weight : 8.2 gr
Diameter : 23 mm

 

I just like it for having both Marcus and Verus, but I love the depiction of the temple. The patina is not bad, but that is not why I got it. It was relatively cheap, and not especially pleasant but I like it for the historical connections of the 2 emperors and the nice architecture.

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A relative subject. Eye appeal, commonality and condition, are things that each individual values differently. For me there are no worst coins as each one brings with it so much history that I can only imagine. The only coin I feel sad for is this Lucilla with unfortunately a lot of the legend missing.

299742651_Lucilla164169ADAEAsStruck.jpg.1eb8d297ca41daaf6de4461586650656.jpg

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I have lots of uglies from group lots that were bonus wins or from unclean lots… but of those uglies, only a few are in my real “collection.”

My two ugliest are probably this Alexandrian Obol that turned out to be my only Otho…
OthoAlexandriaEmmett192.JPG.8afc683fc72ac4c11b5cb35077c073d8.JPG

Image.GIF.d44c3990b057323b6036d18f982b8b8b.GIF

…and this Faustina II that was the target or someone’s anger or boredom. 

FaustinaII.PNG.c1a3c210c41eb7803b82cc0ac571a7cb.PNG

Edited by Orange Julius
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This is probably my worst for detail.

fau_sestertius.jpg.00aa7fafe6ac82a14d85c216672e1f6f.jpg

Diva Faustina Senior. Æ Sestertius (32mm, 21.19 g.)
Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, circa AD 146-161.
Obv. DIVA FAVSTINA draped bust right.
Rev. AETERNITAS S-C seated left, holding scepter and globe surmounted by phoenix....RICIII #1103 (Antoninus Pius)
Reddish-brown patina.

But I do love this coin...It was cheap, has a beautiful red/brown patina, it's big and feels great in hand...

 

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7 minutes ago, Spaniard said:

 beautiful red/brown patina, it's big and feels great in hand...

 

The most important IMO. If coins could talk it would have far more to say about where it had been and who had it in their hand, than a coin that was hidden away soon after being struck, IMO.

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If by "worst" you mean "worn," this is the most worn but still identifiable coin in my collection. The ID is made by recognizing the portrait as belonging to Julia Domna by her distinctive hairstyle and by recognizing that corn ears and a long torch are attributes of Ceres. I like the coin because it was fun to identify and it comes in handy for threads such as this one.

[IMG]
Julia Domna, AD 193-217.
Roman Æ as, 13.49 g, 27.6 mm, 5 h.
Rome, AD 198.
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: CERES S C, Ceres standing left, holding corn ears and long torch; altar at feet, left.
Refs: RIC 870; BMCRE 781; Cohen 19; RCV 6636; Hill 346.

Here's the example in the British Museum for comparison:

[IMG]
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Most of my coins are worn. I prefer a coin to have a story, particularly those that aren’t all that pretty even in perfect condition.

Caligula As, 37-41image.jpeg.28a71baaec213658d5df7a001f6883df.jpegRome. Bronze, 27mm, 10.26g. Agrippa (45-12BC) issued by Caligula (37-41) and countermarked by Claudius (41-54). Head of Agrippa, left wearing rostral crown; M AGRIPPA L F COS III. Neptune standing left holding dolphin and trident; S C; TIAV countermark (RIC I, 58). Ex James Pickering. The countermark was applied to barbarous imitations and worn coins to allow their use in provinces like Britain, where there was a coin shortage.

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5 hours ago, Spaniard said:

This is probably my worst for detail.

fau_sestertius.jpg.00aa7fafe6ac82a14d85c216672e1f6f.jpg

Diva Faustina Senior. Æ Sestertius (32mm, 21.19 g.)
Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, circa AD 146-161.
Obv. DIVA FAVSTINA draped bust right.
Rev. AETERNITAS S-C seated left, holding scepter and globe surmounted by phoenix....RICIII #1103 (Antoninus Pius)
Reddish-brown patina.

But I do love this coin...It was cheap, has a beautiful red/brown patina, it's big and feels great in hand...

 

I think this is in a similar condition to my best sestertius 😂 

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I present "Nightmare Vitellius", he's seen a lot in his 2000+ years. Now, he worse for wear and has had the dreaded "Bronze Disease"  several times. He's been in remission for about 2 years now, but still needs his several months check up, just to be sure.

Hang in here, buddy, I am pulling for you and will do what I can to keep you comfortable for the next care taker.

vitelltet.jpg.c7f05a0286dc52db00676a80eec749a1.jpg

Vitellius (69 A.D.)

Egypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: ΩΛΟΥ ΟΥΙΤ ΚΑΙΣ ΣΕΒ ΓΕΡΜ ΑΥΤ, laureate head right.
R: Nike advancing left, holding wreath with her extended right hand and palm frond with her left; LA (date) to left.
26mm
12.1g
RPC 5372; Köln 260-2; Dattari 340; K&G 19.1. Emmett 196.1

 

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I'm not sure what my 'worst' coin is.  Probably some semi-identifiable, bd-encrusted piece that I acquired in 'uncleaned' lots.  I'm quite sure I don't like my worst coin.

But playing along with the spirit of the thread, that's a tough question, maybe this?

RIC I 267 Italian mint, 30-29 BC, 18mm, 2.63g  VG

Rx: quadriga set atop triumphal arch (Actian arch)

 

 

679770754_Octavian-44-27BC-ARDenarius-RIC126718mm.2.63gActianArchaF.jpg.27a1a2a65972bdb6a65311db3f852d32.jpg

 

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This may be my worst looking coin and my worst photo of a coin. It does look better in hand. I mainly picked it up because it's one of the few ancient coins believed to have been minted within modern-day Luxembourg, which is important to me since I'm Luxembourgish.

678A3583-Edit.jpg.a00adaecd3b960ba5951b394f220822b.jpg

Celtic Gaul. Treveri.
50-30 BCE
AE 16.51mm 3.23g
Obverse: Elephant walking right, trampling on horned serpent
Reverse: Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head), and apex (priest's hat)
De la Tour 9235, RPC I 501
Ex Marc Breitsprecher

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Here's some competition.

image.jpeg.59aa2aaeaca7a06f80dc2c8aa728e856.jpeg

Hugo Magnus, Ct. of Paris and Duke of Francia 923-956.  Denier of Senlis, formerly attributed to his son, Hugh Capet.  

This CNG listing gives the full (re-)attribution, more succinctly than I could.

https://www.cngcoins.com/Lot.aspx?LOT_ID=4470&BACK_URL=%2fLots.aspx%3fIS_ADVANCED%3d1%26ITEM_IS_SOLD%3d1%26ITEM_INVENTORY_NUMBER%3d%26CONTAINER_NAME%3d%26ITEM_LOT_NUMBER%3d%26ITEM_DESC%3dsenlis%2bdenier%26SEARCH_IN_CONTAINER_TYPE_ID_1%3d1%26SEARCH_IN_CONTAINER_TYPE_ID_3%3d1%26SEARCH_IN_CONTAINER_TYPE_ID_2%3d1%26SEARCH_IN_CONTAINER_TYPE_ID_4%3d1%26VIEW_TYPE%3d0 

I found it on Delcampe, 'unattributed as the driven snow.'  Initially, all I could tell was that it was 10th century, and the price was right.  Thanks to this and a more recent, dramatic foray into the last Elsen auction, I now have Robertians and early Capetians from Robert I through Philippe I.  If I ever found an example of Henri I, I'd have the run of them down to Philippe III (1270-1285).

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Maybe not my worst (I have plenty to choose from) this one is poorly struck.  I like it for this history of this time period

:the time of a siege of Caffa that ends with the spreading of the plague to Europe.

image.png.761221b6af81fba4892cf567bb77f904.png

more on this story here:

https://www.sullacoins.com/post/coin-of-the-silk-road

 

 

Edited by Sulla80
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I have many coins in less than stellar condition. I like most of them as much as any other coins in my collection. 
Honest wear does not bother me as long as the coin can be identified without doubts and the aspect is still attractive for me. I think a worn coin has character and shows its journey through history. 

I don't buy group lots -usually I have clear targets. If a coin is important for me AND I like it enough to buy it even if it's not in the best condition AND the price is a bargain = win. 

image.png.7c7d667ed68a33493e5739540bf68512.png

 

image.png.33986b3e9f4085f341e296e053df89b9.pngimage.png.1c9a1fbaa801ea7fc53c40f9f159668d.png

 

image.png.ea3ef3a523f89dd2a6aaa3a5e68c9509.png

image.png.a501d5802387ffce8620c17e93965d73.pngimage.png.af35d8102cc23b2da3f6f2edfe2a71b1.png

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In terms of wear, plus weak strike, plus somewhat rough surfaces, no doubt due to many centuries in the ground, this is likely my worst coin, a sestertius of Faustina II, which came as part of a group lot from France.  I'm still not sure what the reverse design is.  This could be Faustina with a baby, or Faustina with more than one of her children.  It's a bit of a puzzle.

Edit:

I just did a reshoot of the coin.  The original image was pretty bad.  This one is somewhat better.  I also added the new attribution.

Faustina II, AE sestertius, Rome Mint, 161-176 AD, HILARITAS SC.

C 112; RIC 1642

22.85 grams

 

1629278737_D-CameraFaustinaIIAEsestersiusRomeMint161-176ADHILARITASSCC112RIC164222.85g12-26-22.jpg.68b7a75b03e7734e7b41d09b4c4de0b0.jpg

Edited by robinjojo
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3 minutes ago, robinjojo said:

In terms of wear, plus weak strike, plus somewhat rough surfaces, no doubt due to many centuries in the ground, this is likely my worst coin, a sestertius of Faustina II, which came as part of a group lot from France.  I'm still not sure what the reverse design is.  This could be Faustina with a baby, or Faustina with more than one of her children.  It's a bit of a puzzle.

1575264267_D-CameraFaustinaJuniorsestertiuschildren-babies22.8gmseBayRIC16358-23-20.jpg.df9cc43f485ab133f50376b5d76f9cb1.jpg

HILARITAS maybe?

1097120762_FaustinaJrHILARITASSCSestertius.jpg.58778a8c1d2e4deb8842efe14a49e6fb.jpg

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  • Benefactor

Thanks!  That is certainly more plausible than my guess!  I couldn't, for the life of me, figure out how that object she is holding to the right is an infant.  I also see traces of a drapery line to the right, part of her gown.  

Thank you for the assistance!

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My worst isn't a coin but a jeton. Of course of the Dombes principality. It's a rare jeton issued by Gaston d'Orleans that you seldom see for sale. That one was really cheap du to its horrible condition

7c5965af0f2046659e6e07bd9f6911fa.jpg

1623 - Gaston d'Orleans (1627-1650), Jeton, laiton - Atelier de Trévoux

* GASTON. DE. FRANCE - FRERE. VNICQ. D. ROY. Écu d’Anjou (de France à une bordure) couronné et entouré des colliers des ordres du roi.
.SERVAT. VT. SERVIAT. VNI. Pentagramme dans un cercle fleurdelisé (Il les maintient pour servir à un seul.). A l'exergue 1623.
Laiton - 5,02 gr
Ref : Feuardant # 8082

 

A few weeks ago, thanks to a friend of mine I was able to snag its brother in a silver version at auction :

8af2a872ec384d8bb26112daf0d236dd.jpg

1623 - Gaston d'Orleans (1627-1650), Jeton, Argent - Atelier de Trévoux

* GASTON. DE. FRANCE - FRERE. VNICQ. D. ROY. Écu d’Anjou (de France à une bordure) couronné et entouré des colliers des ordres du roi.
.SERVAT. VT. SERVIAT. VNI. Pentagramme dans un cercle fleurdelisé (Il les maintient pour servir à un seul.). A l'exergue 1623.
Argent - 5,37 gr, 27 mm, 6h
Ref : Feuardant # 8082

Q

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I bought this coin thinking it was a Shekel of Tyre.  But, once it came in, I realized quickly that it’s a Demetrius II tetradrachm.

031A17C5-1BCF-4801-B4FC-A5E4DFF233F8.jpeg.0d57a781af3e0869613fe8ba62fbcd88.jpeg1EEC940F-84D7-4F35-AFAB-0069ECB80CDB.jpeg.d3df5f4ffaccb5dceb457ac7fc91dc2b.jpeg

At first I was disappointed because it’ll likely be a very long time before a shekel enters my budget range.  But, then I chose to embrace the coolness of the sea find that it is.  
 

I carry it around in my wallet to show people if a conversation ever visits the subject of coins.  

Erin

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To many rough ones to have a worst. That's way harder than finding my best!

Liked the representation of the Boule on this one.

apa.jpg.50628ae9d2fd1a61c344c416da7fbc09.jpg

Phrygia, Apamea. Pseudo-autonomous AE22. Time of Severus Alexander

Obv: ΒΟΥΛΗ; veiled and draped bust of Boule, r.
Rev: ƐΠΙ Π ΑΙΛ Τ ΙΠ ΑϹΙ ΑΠΑΜƐΩΝ; bundle of corn ears.
RPC VI, 5714 (temporary)

 

 

I would have kept this even if it was in worse shape.

domsec2.jpg.dbdc427ae55932d1f45012668d326691.jpg

Saecular Games sestertius of Domitian

Obv. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P
Rev. COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC S C, Domitian sacrificing from patera over altar, Tellus reclining at left, on right Victimarius holding sacrificial pig, lyreplayer and fluteplayer in background. 35mm, 25.1 gm. BMC 425, Cohen 84, RIC II : 378 (r3).

 

 

This ones so ugly I don't think I've ever showed it.

Patrae.jpg.d0d24d5589e3e93a142ba8a480e5bb33.jpg

Achaea. Achaea, Patrae. Commodus AE28

Commodus, 177-192AD. AE28, 11.21g.
Obv: IMP COMMODVS ANTO AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust r.
Rev: COL A A PATR, Zeus seated l. holding Nike and sceptre.
Ex. BCD. Peloponnesus 563.

 

The definition of ugly and beautiful. 

normal_nerovote.jpg.53ad4ebba2fbb88b28a0c37a6938447f.jpg.

Cilicia, Anazarbus. Nero, 54-68. Hemiassarion AE17. Boule voting.

Obv: NЄPΩN KAICAP Laureate head of Nero to right; on neck, countermark: male head to right within round incuse. Rev: ЄTOVC ςΠ KAICAPЄωN Veiled Boule seated left on throne, dropping voting pebble or tessera into amphora to left.
CY 86 = 67/8.
RPC I 4063. SNG Paris 2010.

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I cherry picked these two from a large lot of worn Parthian and Elymaean AE’s. Made the VCoins seller an offer on just the two since I spotted them in the group shot (of a hundred or so coins) and immediately recognized what they are. He must have thought I was nuts. They are certainly ugly. He surely had no idea about their attribution or how rare they are. He willingly accepted the offer and pulled them from the lot for me. They are the oldest coins from Elymais that I own, issued by the second ruler of that kingdom. These don’t appear on the market very often, and when they do they are usually in this kind of shape - or even worse. So, I’m quite pleased with them.

 

8217665F-62DC-49AC-82B7-016AB1EFCD5F.jpeg.6856fefd12da1b8366ea747a1968edac.jpeg

0B9DC91D-2E04-4E42-804F-DA1A99653482.jpeg.e0c2f78321c9711c5c7d601ec2920b3e.jpeg

Kamnaskires II Nikephoros
AE unit, c. 147 - 139 BC
Van't Haaff 2.7

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Possibly this one. I like it, not only because it  is extremely rare, but more important, because the depiction  of Callisto is unique and interesting.

 

Septimius_Severus_Orchomenos_R814_fac.jpg.e190543e1d76576a909326b165f8ac89.jpg

Arkadia, Orchomenos, Septimius Severus

Septimius Severus
Arkadia, Orchomenos
Diassarion (2 Assaria) Æ
Obv.: [...]CEOVHP[...], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: [ΟΡΧΟ]ΜΕΝ[ΙΩΝ], Artemis expels Callisto: Artemis standing facing left, her head to right, holding bow (?) with her right hand and extending her left to Callisto right, who holds a bow.
AE, 23 mm, 5,50 g
Ref.: -

Edited by shanxi
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Probus

Obv:– IMP C PROBVS AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust left with spear over right shoulder
Rev:– TEMPOR FELICIT, Felicitas standing right, holding caduceus and cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (II in exe) Emission 8 Officina 2. Autumn to Late A.D. 281
Reference:– Cohen -. Bastien -. RIC 108 (Rare)
Obverse die match to the plate coin in RIC

Weight 3.81g. 22.50mm. 0 degrees

RI_132pf_img.jpg

An awful example but a vrey rare bust for Probus at this mint with very few examples know to exist

Edited by maridvnvm
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