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A trachy of Michael VIII with Andronicus II, Sear 2318

Obverse: Bust of St. Nicholas

Andronicus II on the left, Michael VIII on the right, holding patriarchal cross between them, crowned by Christ above

Next: A coin struck by the Latin Empire

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Just now, Ryro said:

Coin depicting an actual person and not a God or Goddess on an RR

0020-018.jpg.4dde1b51471bc773429bedd685f28158.jpg

Sextus Pompeius and Q. Nasidius, Denarius - Mint moving with Sextus Pompeius, Sicily, 42-39 BC
NEPTVNI, head of Pompey the great right, trident before head, dolphin below
Q.NASIDIVS at exergue, galley sailing right, star in upper field
3.92 gr
Ref : HCRI # 235, RCV # 1390, Crawford # 483/2, Sydenham # 1350, Cohen # 20
Ex Freeman & Sear, Ex Barry Feirstein collection (NAC auction # 42/279)
Ex Roma Numismatics

 

Next : someone from the pompeian party

Q

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  • Benefactor
Posted · Benefactor
7 hours ago, Ryro said:

 we're past six hours:

 

Is that the new time limit? If so, I approve. The 12-hour rule has stopped the thread at CT in its tracks too many times.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Ryro said:

share8020996571939975746.png.f50b8b0c8c62ced6423478046700e025.pngnext: strange symbolism

73515EF1-DE24-420A-BE4F-DFB8BA9BC51D.thumb.jpeg.de58cd7c82e2891a2d35c899ad40b96b.jpeg

This coin feature “Christ of the Chalke Gate”. It was a large icon of Christ which hung over the Chalke gate, itself leading into the imperial palace. This icon sparked the iconoclastic controversy 400 years earlier when its attempted removal caused a woman to kill a soldier and in turn be martyred. The descriptions of the icons don’t match up over time and its not even clear if the icon ever actually existed. Perhaps the removal in the iconoclast controversy was only later invented to have a public victory by “restoring” a “removed” icon.

And why does it never appear on a coin in that era but only 400 years later? The emperor wasn’t even based in Constantinople during this era. What does having a depiction of specific icon symbolize? Did this icon have significance in later centuries now lost to us? Was it saved during the sack of 1204 and thus seen as legitimizing? Was it destroyed and this is a memorial? Is it even the same icon from the iconoclast period? Does Christ Chalcities mean something else?…very strange symbolism indeed. What is this usage supposed to mean?

See my recent more in-depth write up here: 

 

Next up: Christ Emmanuel on a coin!

Edited by TheTrachyEnjoyer
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Posted · Supporter
25 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

Is that the new time limit? If so, I approve. The 12-hour rule has stopped the thread at CT in its tracks too many times.

Yep! I posted somewhere earlier that 12 was just like a punishment for people being too picky with their requests. 

Glad you like it a well😀

A real tough and old school SOB... and one of my favorite short lived emperors:

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Next: another worn rarity

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Pescennius Niger. AD 193-194. AR Denarius. Antioch mint.
Obverse..IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG, Laureate head right.
Reverse...FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae. RIC IV 26d.

1708330353_20201103_Pescennius-Niger(1).jpg.98217d67e5d3c7af80f9f58a6b0db920.jpg

Next....Usurper 

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Posted (edited)

Hard to find

5-Asses: (Similar to a Roman AR Quinarius)
[IMG]
ETRURIA, POPULONIA.
Etruria Populonia
AR 5 Asses 2.0g
3rd C BCE
Obv: Young Head L, V (denomination) behind
Rev: blank
HN 173 Vecchi Rasna III 52 ex NAC 29 No 9 RARE


AR-5 Asses

Ex: Künker Auction 295 Lot 124

Next: Another non-Roman Italia

Edited by Alegandron
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Lounging Bull

[IMG]
Marsic Confederation
AR Denarius
Bovianum(?) mint, 89 BCE.
3.93g, 20mm, 3h
Obv: Laureate head of Italia left, VITELIA = ITALIA in Oscan script
Rev: Soldier standing facing, head right, foot on uncertain object, holding inverted spear and sword, recumbent bull to right facing; retrograde B in exergue.
Ref: Campana 122 (same dies); HN Italy 407
Ex: Eucharius Collection.
Ex: Roma Auction 11, Lot 607

Next: Lounging Bull, again 😀

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