Jump to content

Julian II, The Apostate: Brings back the old gods and chews bubble gum...too bad for Christianity he was all out of bubble gum


Ryro

Recommended Posts

Likely having been killed via an assassin's spear (though, with Christian chroniclers being so hostile to his memory you'd think Jesus of Nazareth had been the one who threw the spear) it is somewhat ironic to see him sporting one on my new coin, left of him above his detailed shield:

4377676_1691143158.l-removebg-preview.png.9948d757ec29081dda70bd2b44b879ae.png

Julian II. Apostate. (361-363 AD). Æ Follis. (17mm, 2,96g) Antioch. Obv: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG. diademed, helmeted and armed bust left. Rev: VOT / X / MVLT / XX. legend in wreath.

1_Vvph_YuRDLpbD5Y1Q-8p6A.webp.d70252e3a9289c44d8e2db36c13fe325.webp

"Julian had been brought up as a Christian but preferred the pagan Hellenism and philosophy of the Greeks and rejected Christianity by the age of 20. He kept his pagan sympathies and feelings secret though, and that was to prevent getting estranged from the rest of the Imperial family which was now entirely Christian and increasingly intolerant of pagan values. Certainly coming out as a pagan would have ended any chance of him being raised to the purple. He did however openly came out as a pagan when he became Emperor and when it was safe to do so."

1200px-Raffaello_concilio_degli_dei_02.jpeg.527190bb3a274c7e6fb5ad8910724d1d.jpeg

A couple other coins of the well educated emperor:

C350D8D6-0E97-411A-B927-C1AAA03D5B27.png.27d0b49f38dd7b806a7f1ef55ca959ce.png

Julian II AD 360-363. Nicomedia Double Maiorina Æ 27mm., 8,68g. D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / SECVRITAS REI PVB, bull standing right, two stars above, (palm)-NIKΓ-(palm) in exergue. very fine RIC 121; LRBC 2319 

02188410-8E7D-47CD-8770-17438EB5721E.png.e41754bae973ad36114b178d4481068b.png

Julian II As Caesar, AD 355-360. Æ Aquileia mint, 3rd officina. Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right; M behind / Soldier standing left, holding shield and spearing fallen horseman; shield on ground to right; AQT(palm). RIC VIII 223; LRBC 940.

440px-264_arte_romana_sacrificio_forse_dellimperatore_giuliano_IV_sec._01.jpeg.ded1ea230076094edb35dc5d8c86b24f.jpeg4th-century cameo of an emperor, probably Julian, performing sacrifice (National Archaeological Museum, Florence)

Anyone have any coins of the Apostate they would like to share?

Edited by Ryro
  • Like 17
  • Thanks 1
  • Clap 2
  • Heart Eyes 2
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Ryro changed the title to Julian II, The Apostate: Brings back the old gods and chews bubble gum...too bad for Christianity he was all out of bubble gum

Mine either aren't photographed or in the case of the AE1, are too decrepit to share.

I'd like to get a really nice example of the bull type, from Antioch.  This https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/london_ancient_coins/89/product/julian_ii_360363___antioch__r_bull/1479076/Default.aspx    would have been ideal, but shipping woes from the UK made me delay too long.  i recently looked for one on vcoins, but they either had lousy (or fake) patinas, or were too expensive.  I rarely seek the Antioch mint out, but they produced the best portraits of this emperor, in my opinion.

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beautiful coin for your collection. Great acquisition. I can show the only Julian II in my possession, rather poor condition though

Julian II AE3. 355-361 AD struck under authority of Constantine II.
 DN IVLIAN-VS NOB C, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right /
SPES REI-PVBLICAE, emperor standing left, helmeted and in military dress, holding globe and inverted spear. Mintmark dot ΔSISV.
RIC VIII Siscia 402..
14mm, 2.25gr
Julian II, "The Apostate": Caesar 355-360 AD, Augustus 360-363 AD. The last true "pagan" emperor responsible for re-instating the Pagan religion, and who revered the ancient gods until the day he died in 363 from a javelin wound fighting the Persians.

 

20230501_081957__2_-removebg-preview-side.jpg

  • Like 11
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That Antioch AE is in great condition. Most I've seen are difficult even to identify.

Here's my best, but it's silver.

Julian II Siliqua, 361-363
image.png.a4ccc479ce2bc2e665d1ac4c800d781c.png
Lugdunum. Silver, 17mm, 1.90g. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; FL CL IVLIA-NVS P P AVG. VOTIS V MVLTIS X in laurel wreath; PLVG in exergue (RIC VIII, 227). From the Harptree (Somerset) Hoard 1887.

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 1
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is also silver, but he's looking a lot less himself 🤣

Julian II Contemporary Imitation Siliqua, 361-363
image.png.37298df0ecf2302838736a8c0cbc371f.png
Imitating Arles. Silver, 16mm, 1.63g. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; D N FL CL IVLIA-NVS P F AVG. VOT X MVLT XX within wreath, dot in medallion at top; CONS in exergue (cf RIC VIII, 312). From the West Norfolk/Grimston Hoard 2018. Portable Antiquities Scheme: NMS-963FF1.

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 1
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is my Julian II "Bull" coin.

360_to_363_JulianII_AE1_BIMalorina_01.png.bcbce848ee00e3805cd57f10922d78b3.png360_to_363_JulianII_AE1_BIMalorina_02.png.fb18d2deb83bd88fd5256c8a611bd9f6.png
Julian II (360 - 363) AE1 (BI Maiorina); Thessalonika Mint; Obv: DN FL CL IVLIANUS PF AUG; Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Rev: SECVRITAS REIPVB; Bull standing right, two stars above;*TESΓ in exergue; Ref: RIC 226

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, John Conduitt said:

That Antioch AE is in great condition. Most I've seen are difficult even to identify.

Here's my best, but it's silver.

Julian II Siliqua, 361-363
image.png.a4ccc479ce2bc2e665d1ac4c800d781c.png
Lugdunum. Silver, 17mm, 1.90g. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; FL CL IVLIA-NVS P P AVG. VOTIS V MVLTIS X in laurel wreath; PLVG in exergue (RIC VIII, 227). From the Harptree (Somerset) Hoard 1887.

Great coins and thanks! As beautiful as the Lugdunum Siliqua is, and it's very, that imitation is so intriguing!!!?

And good call about how rotten my new coin's types usually are. 

Here's what I'm upgrading from:

66C632DA-4E53-4B8F-879E-5AFE2FFDA8EB.jpeg.97f12b6aecc8a006c7022c13a0324cf1.jpeg

And the coin I also won today, just in case I didn't land my mark:

4377263_1691142866.l.jpg.1ca0b81a12d801b14240f29fc3f0d8b4.jpg

Julianus II. Apostata. (361-363 AD). Æ Follis. (18mm, 2,50g) Antioch. Obv: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG. diademed, helmeted and armed bust left. Rev: VOT / X / MVLT / XX. legend in wreath.

ps, I like saying Apostata over Apostate. It sounds like a fancy pasta

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My double maiorina with bull reverse (most iconic reverse for this emperor, I think) is so ugly that it's beautiful. 

image.png.983da6ec509e166ed66bc8701bdd3020.png

28 mm, 7,71 g.

Julian II 360-363. Æ double maiorina. Heraclea.

D N FL CL IVLI-ANVS P F AVG, bust of Julian, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed, right / SECVRITAS REI PVB, Bull, standing right, head facing; above, two stars. Mintmark •HER(A on •)CL•A.

RIC VIII Heraclea 104.

In the entire Roman coinage history there were talented engravers and ... not so gifted apprentices, but I am almost sure this is a barbarous imitation, unless this was the only work performed by an engraver, who then got his behind parts kicked out of the mint after seeing this result. 

Edited by ambr0zie
  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

My bull:

Apis Bull - Nope.

Taurus - Maybe

Sacrificial Bull - Maybe

 

julian5.jpg.621be0fec5aa8e6562470d77e206b845.jpg

julian6.jpg.f86bdbcba564e3636849f956acda00b7.jpg

 

The death of Julian account from Ammianus Marcellinus:

"After having spoken these words in a calm tone, wishing to distribute his private property to his closer friends, as if with the last stroke of his pen, he called for Anatolius, his chief court-marshal. And when the prefect Salutius replied "He has been happy," he understood that he had been slain, and he who recently with such courage had been indifferent to his own fate, grieved deeply over that of a friend. Meanwhile, all who were present wept, whereupon even then maintaining his authority, he chided them, saying that it was unworthy to mourn for a prince who was called to union with heaven and the stars.  As this made them all silent, he himself engaged with the philosophers Maximus and Priscus in an intricate discussion about the nobility of the soul. Suddenly the wound in his pierced side opened wide, the pressure of the blood checked his breath, and after a draught of cold water for which he had asked, in the gloom of midnight he passed quietly away in the thirty-second year of his age." 

Edited by Ancient Coin Hunter
  • Like 12
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ancient Coin Hunter said:

My bull:

Apis Bull - Nope.

Taurus - Maybe

Sacrificial Bull - Maybe

 

julian5.jpg.621be0fec5aa8e6562470d77e206b845.jpg

julian6.jpg.f86bdbcba564e3636849f956acda00b7.jpg

 

The death of Julian account from Ammianus Marcellinus:

"After having spoken these words in a calm tone, wishing to distribute his private property to his closer friends, as if with the last stroke of his pen, he called for Anatolius, his chief court-marshal. And when the prefect Salutius replied "He has been happy," he understood that he had been slain, and he who recently with such courage had been indifferent to his own fate, grieved deeply over that of a friend. Meanwhile, all who were present wept, whereupon even then maintaining his authority, he chided them, saying that it was unworthy to mourn for a prince who was called to union with heaven and the stars.  As this made them all silent, he himself engaged with the philosophers Maximus and Priscus in an intricate discussion about the nobility of the soul. Suddenly the wound in his pierced side opened wide, the pressure of the blood checked his breath, and after a draught of cold water for which he had asked, in the gloom of midnight he passed quietly away in the thirty-second year of his age." 

That's a beautiful eulogy from Marcellinus 😊. Despite the roughness, your coin has an attractive patina 😉. Pictured below is a Julian bronze from my collection. 2491172-015AKCollection.jpg.133344a6c8f7ac9eb256d955a0a38443.jpg

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2
  • Heart Eyes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

An official silique from Arelate,  despite the mint mark which might suggest it was struck in Constantinople.  The clue is the eagle on the medallion on the top of the wreath.  

image.jpeg.c250cf3d460d166ca307c28408c7a4b4.jpegimage.jpeg.d16bceecb72d280c5fd9443d8484c1d5.jpeg

2023.5 from Goldberg auction 133 lot # 2202   0n 27 January 2023.  Prior to this, ex: CNG with provenance from the Harptree Hoard, 1887.  Julian II silver siliqua 2.23 grams AD 360-363 EF. VOTIS X MULT XX

An imitative silique ostensibly from Lugdunum.

image.jpeg.3cdb7ff6f0ae6982d977e5aea736daf7.jpegimage.jpeg.af132a4f56ead140e2a8677f3d8b3d05.jpeg

purchased from Artemide Aste 9/21.  Weight 1.37 grams.

 

An imitative solidus ostensibly from Lugdunum.  

image.jpeg.a65270a1affdfbdec85051e70d31b90f.jpegimage.jpeg.7bae8cd0c85d2a681496ef8c0c6f9717.jpeg

My notes on this coin:

a heavyweight 4.59 gram gold Solidus in high relief in the style of an aureus, modeled on a coin of Lugdunum.  Cf. RIC 226 (Lyon).  Purchased by private treaty from Freeman and Sear, at the NY Int’l Coin show 01/2004 for RATT.  

Reverse legend is VIRTUS EXERC CALI  the last word meant to be GALL in praise of Julian’s army in Gaul.  

Ex: Dr. E. Poncet collection,(Bourgey, 15 March 1926, lot #71), then Triton III lot #1224 “unusual and extremely rare”;  and Leu 72, 12 May 1998 lot#542. “One of only two specimens known” per Freeman and Sear, published in their mail bid list #9 on 7/16/2003.  

 

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
  • Heart Eyes 3
  • Shock 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hrefn said:

An official silique from Arelate,  despite the mint mark which might suggest it was struck in Constantinople.  The clue is the eagle on the medallion on the top of the wreath.  

image.jpeg.c250cf3d460d166ca307c28408c7a4b4.jpegimage.jpeg.d16bceecb72d280c5fd9443d8484c1d5.jpeg

2023.5 from Goldberg auction 133 lot # 2202   0n 27 January 2023.  Prior to this, ex: CNG with provenance from the Harptree Hoard, 1887.  Julian II silver siliqua 2.23 grams AD 360-363 EF. VOTIS X MULT XX

An imitative silique ostensibly from Lugdunum.

image.jpeg.3cdb7ff6f0ae6982d977e5aea736daf7.jpegimage.jpeg.af132a4f56ead140e2a8677f3d8b3d05.jpeg

purchased from Artemide Aste 9/21.  Weight 1.37 grams.

 

An imitative solidus ostensibly from Lugdunum.  

image.jpeg.a65270a1affdfbdec85051e70d31b90f.jpegimage.jpeg.7bae8cd0c85d2a681496ef8c0c6f9717.jpeg

My notes on this coin:

a heavyweight 4.59 gram gold Solidus in high relief in the style of an aureus, modeled on a coin of Lugdunum.  Cf. RIC 226 (Lyon).  Purchased by private treaty from Freeman and Sear, at the NY Int’l Coin show 01/2004 for RATT.  

Reverse legend is VIRTUS EXERC CALI  the last word meant to be GALL in praise of Julian’s army in Gaul.  

Ex: Dr. E. Poncet collection,(Bourgey, 15 March 1926, lot #71), then Triton III lot #1224 “unusual and extremely rare”;  and Leu 72, 12 May 1998 lot#542. “One of only two specimens known” per Freeman and Sear, published in their mail bid list #9 on 7/16/2003.  

 

I love all 3 of those coins 😍, but the solidus is in a class by itself 🤩!

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your kind words, @Al Kowsky.   The other known example of the Julian solidus was owned by another famous French collector, by the name of Bastien.  It is an obverse and reverse die match, but the reverse has two prominent die cracks visible.   It was offered in an auction last year by Burgan Numismatique, Maison Florange, as seen below.  Online auction 22-1 lot #33 on 6 march 2022 with starting bid of 7000 euro, but went unsold (I believe.)  I do not know its whereabouts now.

image.png.620c97637208a21fb03cfc702061c80e.png

Not my coin

I briefly contemplated buying it and having the two coins made into a pair of cuff links, but then I thought better of it.  There are so few occasions to wear French cuffs nowadays.  😉

 

Edited by Hrefn
Typo
  • Like 8
  • Big Smile 1
  • Cookie 1
  • Laugh 2
  • Smile 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

That first coin you posted is gorgeous, @Ryro. I have an example with the same legends and design, but from a different mint:

Julian II, AE Centenionalis, 361-363 AD,  Sirmium [Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia] Mint, 2nd Officina. Obv. Pearl-diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand, shield in left, D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG / Rev. VOT/X/MVLT/XX in four lines within wreath. In exergue: BSIRM [BETA SIRMIUM = Second officina in Sirmium] RIC VIII Sirmium 108, Cohen VIII 151, Sear RCV V 19172. 20.3 mm, 3.393 g.

image.jpeg.c91908a9e626774639e2d60c635bf44c.jpeg

 

Some more Julian II's, since I haven't posted any coins of his in a few months:

My bull coin, also from Sirmium (coincidentally):

Julian II, AE Double Maiorina, 361-363 AD, Sirmium [Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia] Mint, 2nd Officina.  Obv. Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG / Bull (prob. Taurus) standing right, two stars above, SECVRITAS REIPVB; in exergue: mintmark star-BSIRM-palm branch. RIC VIII Sirmium 107B (p. 392), Sear RCV V 19152 (ill.), Cohen 38. 28 mm., 8.48 g. Purchased from Frank S. Robinson, Auction 113, Sep 2, 2020, Lot 315.

image.png.69bc56c828011d9a708bc6d452cfc686.png

Two siliquae, one beardless and one bearded:

Julian II (nephew of Constantine I), AR reduced Siliqua*, AD 360-361, Arles [Constantina/Arelatum] Mint, 1st Officina. Obv. Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, DN IVLIAN-VS P F AVG / Rev. VOTIS/V/MVLTIS/X in four lines within wreath. In exergue: PCON [PRIMA CONSTANTINA = First officina in Arles]. RIC VIII Arles 295, RSC V 16, Sear RCV V 19132. 17 mm., 2.2 g.

image.jpeg.9ce02fd8bb07eba6ccd6f4db388bbdf0.jpeg

Julian II (nephew of Constantine I), AR reduced Siliqua*, AD 362-363, Antioch Mint. Obv. Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, bearded, FL CL IVLIA-NVS PF AVG / Rev. VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; in exergue, ANT [Antioch]. 2.17 g., 19.33 x 18.40 mm., 6 h. RIC VIII 213 (p. 531), RSC V 147a, Sear RCV V 19128 (p. 279), Ghey 22 (this coin) [Ghey, E., “Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire,” unpublished catalogue held by British Museum]. Purchased 17 May 2022 from Noonans (f/k/a Dix Noonan Webb) Auction, “The Vale of Pewsey Hoard of Late Roman Silver Coins,” Lot 11; ex Vale of Pewsey Hoard, discovered in Wiltshire 12-13 Sep. 2020, Portable Antiquities Scheme Hoard ID BM-7D34D9 (see https://finds.org.uk/database/hoards/record/id/3305).**

image.png.8de6a8446de5fcfa94b79d383b496ef3.png

*See Sear RCV V at p. 271: “in AD 357 the weight of the [siliqua] denomination was reduced by one-third to 2 scripula or 2.25 grams.”

**See Noonans Auction Catalogue, at https://www.noonans.co.uk/media/auction_catalogues/Coins 17 May 22.pdf, p. 3:

"Presented here for sale is a hoard of fourth and early fifth century Roman silver coins, recovered in September 2020 from farmland in the Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire, by a team of three avid metal detectorists. Over the course of two days Rob Abbott, Dave Allen and Mick Rae discovered a total of 160 silver coins and coin fragments, which were subsequently submitted to the relevant authorities for processing according to the Treasure Act 1997
(PAS BM–7D34D9, BM 2020 T702).

No container has been recovered from the site and the coins’ dispersal over an area of around 30 metres across the field suggests that the original parcel was disrupted in recent times by agricultural activity. A few of the recovered coins were badly chipped, broken or fragmentary. Most of these breaks look fresh and it would seem that this unfortunate damage has resulted from regular ploughing of the field for agricultural purposes.

We should be enormously grateful, therefore, that the hoard was recovered when it was before more coins succumbed to a similar fate. Numismatists and historians alike should appreciate the diligent efforts of these three finders in rescuing the Vale of Pewsey Hoard and ensuring that this important group was properly recorded for future study.

Following assessment and appraisal the British Museum decided to acquire two Miliarensia from the group for the Nation’s collection. The remaining coins were disclaimed and returned to the original finders, who have now chosen to sell the hoard so that private scholars and numismatists may have the opportunity to acquire examples for their own collections. Only those pieces in fragmentary state have been retained by the finders, and all 142 complete, or near complete, coins are listed in this catalogue; eighteen Miliarensia and 124 Siliquae.

Amongst them are numerous rare and beautifully preserved specimens which will appeal to specialist Roman collectors and general numismatists alike."

The breakdown of the 142 lots is as follows (see id. p. 10):

CONSTANS (337–350) 1
CONSTANTIUS II (337–361) 2–7
JULIAN II (360–363) 8–11
VALENTINIAN I (364–375) 12–14
VALENS (364–378) 15–33
GRATIAN (367–383) 34–49
VALENTINIAN II (375–392) 50–59
THEODOSIUS I (379–395) 60–74
MAGNUS MAXIMUS (383–388) 75–92
FLAVIUS VICTOR (387–388) 93–95
ARCADIUS (383–408) 96–118
EUGENIUS (392–394) 119–133
HONORIUS (393–423) 134–142

See also https://finds.org.uk/database/hoards/record/id/3305, noting that “Most of the coins have been only lightly clipped to remove silver from the edges of the coins, unlike many hoards with a deposition date into the fifth century AD. There are also few obviously irregular coins in the group. The total weight in silver of the late Roman coins submitted is 328.76g, remarkably close to a Roman pound in silver.”

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 1
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great coins @Ryro and everyone else. I have a soft spot for Julian coins (along with every other Roman coin). I have quite a few and am making a slow run at a wreath coin from every mint. I have 8 photographed and a few unphotographed… then like 3 more to find (Cyzicus, Lyons, Constantinople) and several I’d like to upgrade.

My Antioch like yours:
JulianIIAntiochVICVIII-220.JPG.45f33c6855dc5bc7c7acf7a79a47e2b7.JPG

Arles
JulianIIArlesRICVIII-324.JPG.fbf672407a55a308b253e7c994309f0c.JPG

Alexandria
JulianIIAlexandriaRICVIII-91.JPG.dd698e81911e565d72a8c12e3a93f3dd.JPG

Siscia
JulianIISisciaRICVIII-415.JPG.ce6d586fedbd425419e564a05ff3e528.JPG

Heraclea
JulianIIHeracleaRICVIII-106.JPG.be83f4036ddaed6deabd98f055fe2ecc.JPG

Sirmium
JulianIISirmiumRICVIII-108.JPG.765c501092da7d2376ba4263c2d88539.JPG

Rome
JulianIIRomeRICVIII-329.JPG.c0d2adac9f221feef0017411b9e1bd4a.JPG

Thessalonica
JulianIIThessalonicaRICVIII-228.JPG.2982d22ecabe5928de5a32c5f2cccfe3.JPG

Edited by Orange Julius
  • Like 8
  • Heart Eyes 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nicely detailed new addition, @Ryro! And informative write-up, as always! 👍 Here's one from my collection.

821790386_JulianIIVOTXMVLTXXAntioch.jpg.e8f2761d56d5093870b4c58aa7987d4b.jpg

Julian II, 361-363.
Roman Silvered AE 3 Centenionalis; 3.16 g. 18.3 mm.
Antioch mint, AD 362-363.
Obv: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F, helmeted and cuirassed bust, left, holding spear and shield.
Rev: VOT X MVLT XX, legend within wreath; in exergue: ANTA between two palm fronds.
Refs: RIC 220; Cohen 151; RCV 19181; LRBC 2642.

  • Like 9
  • Clap 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Julian II ended up reversing Roman gains in Mesopotamia for 227 years. In addition, his taxation policy left the governments of Valens and Valentinian I, very crunched for money. Lastly, poor Valens had to clean up the mess in Armenia while sending troop detachments to his brother Valentinian I to shore up the western frontiers. While a capable Caesar he proved to be a poor Augustus, in my view. 
Still, Julian II produced some nice coins. Here is my latest:

B8B1FED1-8B9D-406A-AA32-8E70134C7B0F.png.4ace386f586ddb7a5e5b5eeb999fcb7b.png

5DE68FAC-5DE5-4D2A-B077-3D9B58EC49CC.jpeg.ca81bef2eb77b1532039d9a039f9d2c2.jpeg

Julian II AR Siliqua

Lugdunum mint

A.D. 361-363

2.26 grams 

 

  • Like 6
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was the Rowdy Roddy Piper line from the cult classic movie "They Live" that brought me here; it was the coins of Julian that made me stay.

Here is my one coin of his:

 

AE1 (29 mm, 9.78 grams, 6h), Sirmium mint (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia), 2nd officina

Obverse:  D N FL CL IVLI-ANVS P F AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right

Reverse: SECURITAS REI PVB, bull standing right, two stars above; BSIRM (wreath) in exergue

Reference: RIC VIII 105

Auction: Elsen 64 (December 2, 2002), lot 636

Julian II RIC 105 obverse.png

Julian II RIC 105 reverse.png

  • Like 8
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...