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Jeremy’s top 12 of 2022


Jeremy
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I’m staying inside today as a blizzard sweeps across Minnesota and using the opportunity to pull together my top 12 of 2022. A top 12 because I’ve given up trying to pare down the list to 10 🙂

 

In the last year I found myself buying more Greek and Roman provincial coins, and less Roman imperial coins than in the past. Provincials have been a fun area to collect, since they combine the artistry and mythological themes of Greek coins with high quality, stately portraits of Roman emperors and empresses.

 

I haven’t had much time lately to post on the forum, but I have been lurking regularly and admiring the nice coins and expansive knowledge that everyone contributes.

I hope that 2023 brings you good health, happiness, and lots of coins from your wish list.

In no particular order, my top 12 of 2022:

0lEhf20.jpg

 

12. Cilicia, Tarsos AR Stater

Balakros, satrap of Cilicia under Alexander III Circa 333-323 BC or 330 to 323 BC

Obverse: Baaltars seated left, holding lotus-tipped sceptre, grain ear and grape bunch to left, Σ under throne.

Reverse: Facing bust of Athena, draped, wearing triple-crested helmet and necklace.

References: SNG Levante Suppl. 21; SNG France 368; SNG von Aulock 5964.

24mm; 10.88g

 

 

ig7x7uk.jpg

 

 

11. Caria, Rhodes, Uncertain reign Æ 33 mm

31 BC - 60 AD

Epikrates, magistrate

Obverse: Radiate head of Dionysos left, wearing ivy wreath.

Reverse: PΩΔΙΩΝ ΕΠΙ ΕΠΙΚΡΑΤΕΥϹ; Nike standing left on rose, holding aphlaston and palm.

References: RPC I 2762; SNG von Aulock 2849.

33mm; 26.89g

 

A large, scarce bronze with an anepigraphic obverse that I was drawn to.

 

s8ExwTu.jpg

 

10 Troas, Alexandria, Pseudo-autonomous, Time of Trebonianus Gallus Æ 24mm

251-253 AD

Obverse: CO ALEX TRO; Turreted and draped bust of Tyche right; vexillum to left.

Reverse: COL AVG / TROAD; Apollo, nude to the waist, seated left, holding arrows with his extended right hand, his left hand rests on seat; to left, the priest Krinis, nude to the waist, seated right; at his feet, forepart of hound sniffing the ground; between Apollo and Krinis, the herdsman Orodes standing right, holding pedum; above, animal (likely a mouse) pierced by arrow.

References: RPC IX 473 (2 specimens) var. (obv. legend); Bellinger A481.

24mm; 6.70g

 

An extremely rare mythological type depicting a scene with Apollo Smintheus, a manifestation of Apollo translating to 'Apollo, Lord of Mice'. Apollo Smintheus is mentioned in the very begging of the Iliad, where he unleashes a plague on Agamemnon for kidnapping the daughter of his priest, Chryses.

 

ZJAz2EF.jpg

 

9. Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebeia, Hadrian AR didrachm

117-138 AD

Struck 128-138 AD

Obverse: ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟC CEBACTOC; Laureate head right.

Reverse: Rev.ΥΠΑΤΟC Γ ΠΑΤΗΡ ΠΑΤ; Club flanked by star and crescent.

References: Metcalf 101; Sydenham 282.

22mm; 6.01g

 

bssUAY7.jpg

 

8. Pamphylia, Side AR tetradrachm

Circa 205-100 BC

St-, magistrate

Obverse: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.

Reverse: Nike advancing left, holding wreath; to left, pomegranate above ΣΤ monogram.

References: SNG France 710-12.

29mm; 16.89g

 

cD95lsd.jpg

 

7. Metapontum AR Stater/Nomos

Circa 540-510 BC

Obverse: META upwards on right, ear of barley with eight grains, border of dots within two concentric linear circles.

Reverse: Incuse ear of barley with eight grains, rayed border.

References: Noe Class VI, 125 (same dies); SNG ANS 215; HN Italy 1479.

28mm; 8.12g

 

From an old English collection with dark cabinet toning.

 

RNzTZqh.jpg

 

6. Pisidia, Cremna, Tranquillina (wife of Gordian III) Æ 25mm

238-244 AD

Obverse: SAB TRANQVILLINAM AVGVS[TAM]; Draped bust of Tranquillina right, wearing stephane, crescent behind.

Reverse: COL CREM - N - E - NSIVM; The Three Graces, arm in arm, the one on the left and right each holding a flower.

References: SNG von Aulock, Pisidien II, 1423; SNG Paris 1512.

25mm; 12.11g

 

lMjVUVG.jpg

 

t2jDcZY.jpg

 

5. Asia Minor, uncertain, Antinoüs lead Tessera

Antinoüs died 130 AD

Obverse: Bare-headed, heroic nude three-quarter bust of Antinoüs to left.

Reverse: Engraved chequer pattern.

References: Blum -. Pudill -. Apparently unpublished and unique.

37mm; 55.3g

 

A huge lead tessera I picked up in a Leu Numismatik auction. It’s so big that it even contends with my Ptolemy III tetrobol as the largest object in my collection. I haven’t seen another lead tessera with as nice of a depiction of Antinoüs.

 

j660RF5.jpg

 

4. Pamphylia, Aspendos AR stater

Circa 380-325 BC

Obverse: Two wrestlers grappling; ΣK between.

Reverse: EΣTFEΔIIYΣ; Slinger in throwing stance right; triskeles to right; all within pelleted square border; c/m: wolf running to right within rectangular incuse.

References: Tekin Series 4; SNG BnF 107; for c/m, Tekin, Aspendos Sikkeleri, 28.

 

I had the opportunity to upgrade my old Aspendos stater with this one. It has so much luster it’s hard to photograph.

 

7doUL8o.jpg

 

3. Thrace, Pautalia, Septimius Severus Æ 27mm

193-217 AD

Obverse: AVT Λ CЄΠTI CЄVHPOC ΠЄ; Laureate head right.

Reverse: OVΛΠIAC ΠAVTAΛIAC; The serpent Glykon coiled with four coils, with radiate head right and with fish-like tail.

References: Ruzicka, Pautalia, 396; Varbanov 4806 var. (obverse legend)

29mm; 13.34g

 

One of two coins I added to my Glykon subcollection this year (both from Pautalia in Thrace).

 

vMhZzYN.jpg

 

2.Thrace, Pautalia, Caracalla Æ 30mm

198-217 AD

Obverse: AYT K M AY CEY ANTΩNEINOC; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Caracalla right, seen from the front with aegis.

Reverse: OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC; Asklepios cradling serpent-entwined staff, reclining left, head right, on winged, coiled, and bearded Glycon flying right.

References: Varbanov 5007; Moushmov 4235; Ruzicka 618.

30mm; 18.94g
 

This massive coin depicts the Greek god of healing riding Glykon, an “incarnation” of Asklepios that was invented by a schemer named Alexander of Abonoteichos. Glykon was a huge, live snake adorned with a beard, humanoid face mask, and a fish-like tail. The cult of Glykon grew into an influential cult in the Roman Empire.

 

80GkQSK.jpg

 

1. Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter AR tetradrachm

305/4-282 BC

Struck in Alexandria, 294 BC

Signed 'Delta' tetradrachm

Obverse: Diademed bust of Ptolemy I right, aegis tied around neck; Δ behind ear, dotted border.

Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY-BAΣIΛEΩΣ; Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; P above ΠA monogram in left field.

References: CPE 154; Svoronos 256.

28mm; 14.10g

 

A Ptolemy I tetradrachm signed by the famous Delta engraver behind Ptolemy's ear.
 

Edited by Jeremy
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5 hours ago, Jeremy said:

A top 12 because I’ve given up trying to pare down the list to 10 🙂

I see what you mean. I can barely create a list of my top 5 favourites. As has been said, each coin is not only beautiful but interesting in its own right.

If I had to choose, I would go numbers 9, 8, 4, 3 and 1. Thank you for sharing this with us. Congrats on a great year.

Edited by Hughie Dwyer
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Wonderful, all of them! If I had to pick my favorites, I would choose #'s 12, 8, and 4. Plus the two Glykons.

A point about # 9, your Hadrian didrachm from Caesarea with the club reverse. I have looked carefully, but see no sign at all of a star or crescent flanking the club on your reverse. I think perhaps it's more likely to be one of the several types with only a club, like mine (RPC III 3109 [see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3109 ]):

 image.jpeg.dc83e49892ae9891cd6ce2e054b5eefd.jpeg

See RPC III 3105-3114 for the different types. I'm not sure which is yours.

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47 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

Wonderful, all of them! If I had to pick my favorites, I would choose #'s 12, 8, and 4. Plus the two Glykons.

A point about # 9, your Hadrian didrachm from Caesarea with the club reverse. I have looked carefully, but see no sign at all of a star or crescent flanking the club on your reverse. I think perhaps it's more likely to be one of the several types with only a club, like mine (RPC III 3109 [see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/3109 ]):

 image.jpeg.dc83e49892ae9891cd6ce2e054b5eefd.jpeg

See RPC III 3105-3114 for the different types. I'm not sure which is yours.

Thank you, Donna! You're absolutely right - I had misattributed this. It's actually RPC III 3105, and coincidentally my coin is the feature image in RPC for that number ☺️

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8 hours ago, SimonW said:

Great selection, @Jeremy! I like all your coins, but one particularly stands out to me: the Antinoüs Tessera! 😍 I bought the second big lead Tessera they offered in this auction:

 

02329q00.jpg.6cfe8a6b67c0233fb5bc563474caad61.jpg

I was wondering who bought the Zeus Ammon tessera - it's an amazing piece! Have you been able to find any references for your tessera, or deduce what the winged object is? Mine seems to be unpublished and I'm curious if that's the case for yours as well.

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On 12/23/2022 at 10:37 PM, Jeremy said:

I’m staying inside today as a blizzard sweeps across Minnesota and using the opportunity to pull together my top 12 of 2022. A top 12 because I’ve given up trying to pare down the list to 10 🙂

 

In the last year I found myself buying more Greek and Roman provincial coins, and less Roman imperial coins than in the past. Provincials have been a fun area to collect, since they combine the artistry and mythological themes of Greek coins with high quality, stately portraits of Roman emperors and empresses.

 

I haven’t had much time lately to post on the forum, but I have been lurking regularly and admiring the nice coins and expansive knowledge that everyone contributes.

I hope that 2023 brings you good health, happiness, and lots of coins from your wish list.

In no particular order, my top 12 of 2022:

0lEhf20.jpg

 

12. Cilicia, Tarsos AR Stater

Balakros, satrap of Cilicia under Alexander III Circa 333-323 BC or 330 to 323 BC

Obverse: Baaltars seated left, holding lotus-tipped sceptre, grain ear and grape bunch to left, Σ under throne.

Reverse: Facing bust of Athena, draped, wearing triple-crested helmet and necklace.

References: SNG Levante Suppl. 21; SNG France 368; SNG von Aulock 5964.

24mm; 10.88g

 

 

ig7x7uk.jpg

 

 

11. Caria, Rhodes, Uncertain reign Æ 33 mm

31 BC - 60 AD

Epikrates, magistrate

Obverse: Radiate head of Dionysos left, wearing ivy wreath.

Reverse: PΩΔΙΩΝ ΕΠΙ ΕΠΙΚΡΑΤΕΥϹ; Nike standing left on rose, holding aphlaston and palm.

References: RPC I 2762; SNG von Aulock 2849.

33mm; 26.89g

 

A large, scarce bronze with an anepigraphic obverse that I was drawn to.

 

s8ExwTu.jpg

 

10 Troas, Alexandria, Pseudo-autonomous, Time of Trebonianus Gallus Æ 24mm

251-253 AD

Obverse: CO ALEX TRO; Turreted and draped bust of Tyche right; vexillum to left.

Reverse: COL AVG / TROAD; Apollo, nude to the waist, seated left, holding arrows with his extended right hand, his left hand rests on seat; to left, the priest Krinis, nude to the waist, seated right; at his feet, forepart of hound sniffing the ground; between Apollo and Krinis, the herdsman Orodes standing right, holding pedum; above, animal (likely a mouse) pierced by arrow.

References: RPC IX 473 (2 specimens) var. (obv. legend); Bellinger A481.

24mm; 6.70g

 

An extremely rare mythological type depicting a scene with Apollo Smintheus, a manifestation of Apollo translating to 'Apollo, Lord of Mice'. Apollo Smintheus is mentioned in the very begging of the Iliad, where he unleashes a plague on Agamemnon for kidnapping the daughter of his priest, Chryses.

 

ZJAz2EF.jpg

 

9. Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebeia, Hadrian AR didrachm

117-138 AD

Struck 128-138 AD

Obverse: ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟC CEBACTOC; Laureate head right.

Reverse: Rev.ΥΠΑΤΟC Γ ΠΑΤΗΡ ΠΑΤ; Club flanked by star and crescent.

References: Metcalf 101; Sydenham 282.

22mm; 6.01g

 

bssUAY7.jpg

 

8. Pamphylia, Side AR tetradrachm

Circa 205-100 BC

St-, magistrate

Obverse: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.

Reverse: Nike advancing left, holding wreath; to left, pomegranate above ΣΤ monogram.

References: SNG France 710-12.

29mm; 16.89g

 

cD95lsd.jpg

 

7. Metapontum AR Stater/Nomos

Circa 540-510 BC

Obverse: META upwards on right, ear of barley with eight grains, border of dots within two concentric linear circles.

Reverse: Incuse ear of barley with eight grains, rayed border.

References: Noe Class VI, 125 (same dies); SNG ANS 215; HN Italy 1479.

28mm; 8.12g

 

From an old English collection with dark cabinet toning.

 

RNzTZqh.jpg

 

6. Pisidia, Cremna, Tranquillina (wife of Gordian III) Æ 25mm

238-244 AD

Obverse: SAB TRANQVILLINAM AVGVS[TAM]; Draped bust of Tranquillina right, wearing stephane, crescent behind.

Reverse: COL CREM - N - E - NSIVM; The Three Graces, arm in arm, the one on the left and right each holding a flower.

References: SNG von Aulock, Pisidien II, 1423; SNG Paris 1512.

25mm; 12.11g

 

lMjVUVG.jpg

 

t2jDcZY.jpg

 

5. Asia Minor, uncertain, Antinoüs lead Tessera

Antinoüs died 130 AD

Obverse: Bare-headed, heroic nude three-quarter bust of Antinoüs to left.

Reverse: Engraved chequer pattern.

References: Blum -. Pudill -. Apparently unpublished and unique.

37mm; 55.3g

 

A huge lead tessera I picked up in a Leu Numismatik auction. It’s so big that it even contends with my Ptolemy III tetrobol as the largest object in my collection. I haven’t seen another lead tessera with as nice of a depiction of Antinoüs.

 

j660RF5.jpg

 

4. Pamphylia, Aspendos AR stater

Circa 380-325 BC

Obverse: Two wrestlers grappling; ΣK between.

Reverse: EΣTFEΔIIYΣ; Slinger in throwing stance right; triskeles to right; all within pelleted square border; c/m: wolf running to right within rectangular incuse.

References: Tekin Series 4; SNG BnF 107; for c/m, Tekin, Aspendos Sikkeleri, 28.

 

I had the opportunity to upgrade my old Aspendos stater with this one. It has so much luster it’s hard to photograph.

 

7doUL8o.jpg

 

3. Thrace, Pautalia, Septimius Severus Æ 27mm

193-217 AD

Obverse: AVT Λ CЄΠTI CЄVHPOC ΠЄ; Laureate head right.

Reverse: OVΛΠIAC ΠAVTAΛIAC; The serpent Glykon coiled with four coils, with radiate head right and with fish-like tail.

References: Ruzicka, Pautalia, 396; Varbanov 4806 var. (obverse legend)

29mm; 13.34g

 

One of two coins I added to my Glykon subcollection this year (both from Pautalia in Thrace).

 

vMhZzYN.jpg

 

2.Thrace, Pautalia, Caracalla Æ 30mm

198-217 AD

Obverse: AYT K M AY CEY ANTΩNEINOC; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Caracalla right, seen from the front with aegis.

Reverse: OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC; Asklepios cradling serpent-entwined staff, reclining left, head right, on winged, coiled, and bearded Glycon flying right.

References: Varbanov 5007; Moushmov 4235; Ruzicka 618.

30mm; 18.94g
 

This massive coin depicts the Greek god of healing riding Glykon, an “incarnation” of Asklepios that was invented by a schemer named Alexander of Abonoteichos. Glykon was a huge, live snake adorned with a beard, humanoid face mask, and a fish-like tail. The cult of Glykon grew into an influential cult in the Roman Empire.

 

80GkQSK.jpg

 

1. Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter AR tetradrachm

305/4-282 BC

Struck in Alexandria, 294 BC

Signed 'Delta' tetradrachm

Obverse: Diademed bust of Ptolemy I right, aegis tied around neck; Δ behind ear, dotted border.

Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY-BAΣIΛEΩΣ; Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; P above ΠA monogram in left field.

References: CPE 154; Svoronos 256.

28mm; 14.10g

 

A Ptolemy I tetradrachm signed by the famous Delta engraver behind Ptolemy's ear.
 

Great score on the Aspendos stater with wolf countermark 🤩.

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Very interesting coins, all of them. Difficult to chose a favorite (to keep up with tradition). But I like the reverse of your AE, Pseudo-autonomous, Time of Trebonianus Gallus, showing the Apollo scene. I have not seen that type before. 

Best wishes for 2023! 

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On 12/28/2022 at 2:31 PM, Jeremy said:

I was wondering who bought the Zeus Ammon tessera - it's an amazing piece! Have you been able to find any references for your tessera, or deduce what the winged object is? Mine seems to be unpublished and I'm curious if that's the case for yours as well.

Thank you, @JeremyI haven't found anything that is remotely similar until now. I assume it's unpublished as well.

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