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Ambr0zie's Greek + Provincial Top 10


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Top 10 Greek + Provincial coins  

31 members have voted

  1. 1. Choose your favorite(s)

    • Tralleis, cistophoric tetradrachm
    • Gordian, Hadrianopolis
    • Trajan Decius, Antioch tetradrachm
      0
    • Macedon, Neapolis hemidrachm
    • Maximinus Thrax, Tarsos hexassarion
    • Trajan, Caesarea didrachm
    • Geta, Amasia
    • Lysimachos, Ephesos drachm
    • Caria, Mylasa hemiobol
    • Mazaios, Tarsos stater


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Because other members started to provide their yearly Top 10 coins, I think it's a good idea to summarize how 2022 was for myself and present where does my monthly income go 🤑

I bought a lot of coins in 2022, all important for me and it is impossible to create a single Top 10. I will have a go in December also in an auction, but I don't think I will buy a Greek or Provincial coin. Not one for the Top 10 anyway. It was quite difficult even to choose 10 from these 2 categories.

From the numismatic point of view, 2022 has been an excellent year. As checked in my catalogue, I acquired exactly 100 coins. Which is more than I had in mind last year. Most of them are important coins for me - I remain a generalist collector but I have some clear specific targets (mostly Republican and Imperials, but I didn't neglect the Greek and Provincial coins at all). I was happy to add many of the clear targets and also happy about the price and general aspect of the coins.
My coins are no match for some of the extraordinary coins I see on the Forums - I don't have spectacular rarities or too many pristine condition coins, but I am very proud I managed to improve my knowledge and my collection. A good coin for me doesn't mean the coin needs to be in excellent condition - not a mandatory aspect. It needs to 1. be interesting for me (important ruler/city/historical importance, interesting design) 2. The coin is attractive enough, condition wise 3. The price is decent and satisfying - this is a major criteria. If I buy I coin I value at 100 euros with 70, I am glad. If it's 100, I'm OK. If it's 150, I hate that feeling when I know I overpaid rather than waiting and I spent some budget that could have been used for a different coin.

Here is my selection of 10 coins from the mentioned categories (I still have to consider if I create 2 separate lists for Republican and Imperial or just one). The order is the one I bought the coins in.

1.

image.png.26e540f077952a48f37eb42bb653ced8.png

Lydia. Tralleis circa 133 BC.
Cistophoric Tetradrachm AR
26 mm, 11,75 g
Magistrate Time. Cista mystica with serpent, within ivy wreath. / TΡAΛ to left of bowcase between two coiled serpents, TIME above, cult image of Artemis Anaitis standing front in right field. BMC 31-32; SNG von Aulock 8287; SNG Cop 661; Paris 2700-2701; SNG Leipzig 1269; Mionnet IV, 1026; Pinder 160; Whittall sale 1325b; GRPC Lydia S470

Although they tend to be ignored due to their artistic level being inferior compared to other tetradrachms, I consider the cistophoric tetradrachms iconic for the Greek coinage. I  liked the particularity of this coin - the cult statue. The overall aspect, with the magistrate name visible. I was a little afraid the price will rise above what I feel comfortable with, but it didn't. A cistophoric tetradrachm was an important box to be ticked.  For the future I intend to buy a non-Greek cistophoric.

 

2.

image.png.301d0cdd400326539f523fa4ce8bb945.png

Thrace. Hadrianopolis. Gordian III AD 238-244.
Bronze Æ
16 mm, 2,32 g
AYT K M ANT ΓOΡΔIANOC, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from rear/ AΔΡIANOΠOΛEITΩN, ostrich walking right
Varbanov 3833; RPC VII.2, 806; Jurukova, Hadrianopolis 676; Moushmov 2630A

From the same auction. One of the coins I immediately wanted the moment I saw it. I like coins with animals (in fact it's one of my favorite themes). And an ostrich is a very exotic animal on ancient coins. I consider this one of my best 2022 coins.

3.

image.png.501882eaeabc567e48a3d6aa3f366659.png

Seleucis and Pieria. Antioch. Trajan Decius AD 249-251.
Billon-Tetradrachm
26 mm, 12,18 g
ΑΥΤ Κ Γ ΜƐ ΚΥ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΔƐΚΙΟϹ ϹƐΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Decius, r., seen from rear; below bust: ••••• / ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ƐΞΟΥϹΙΑϹ, S C, eagle standing on palm, l., spreading wings, holding wreath in beak
Group 3, officina 5
RPC IX, 1745, Prieur 584 (15), McAlee 1126e

One thing I don't like about provincial coins (very generally speaking) is that their artistry levels (again generally speaking) are low. The reverses are sometimes generic/dull, the portraits sometimes look like they are done in a hurry. But this is not a rule and certainly not valid for Antioch. I always try to buy a Provincial coin with a well engraved, realistic portrait and a nice, interesing reverse (what I mean - not a deity standing or seated). When the coin comes in great condition (a lot of luster still visible, this is not a major criteria for me but I can't say I dislike these coins), then it becomes very tempting.

4.

image.png.b3bc369fd566499482d2eac7a6cd16fe.png

Macedon. Neapolis circa 425-350 BC.
Hemidrachm AR
13 mm, 1,68 g
Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue. Rev. N-E-O-Π Head of the nymph of Neapolis to right, her hair coiled around her head and with a bun at the back. SNG ANS 430-454.

Simple, this type has been on a top position on my bucket list. I am not a big fan of overcleaning but it is nice enough to deserve a place in the list.

5.

image.png.f9efa7b96bf8edd68caab8e17ba767e7.png

CILICIA, Tarsus. Maximinus I. 235-238 AD. AE Hexassarion. 26.1 g 37mm
Obv: ΑΥΤ Κ Γ ΙΟΥ ΟΥΗ ΜΑΞΙΜƐΙΝΟϹ Π Π, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear / Rev: ΤΑΡϹΟΥ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟ Α Μ Κ Γ Β,  the three Graces standing facing with arms around each other, one head l., the others head r., each holding flower.
RPC VI, 7113 (temporary); SNG Levante 1096, BMC 233–4

I bought this on a Sunday when I was out shopping. Got a little late and I didn't reach home in time for the auction. I was on the bus, checking the auction on my phone. Noticed it live (missed it before). One hand on the shopping bag, one on the phone, won it. It is one of the cheapest coins I bought in 2022 but I love it because of the reverse and, of course, the "abnormal" size. It will be difficult for a coin in my collection to beat this one in size/weight, especially since I don't intend to buy a Ptolemaic large coin.

6.

image.png.ad7627eaab9ca0c32d1c417471b4362a.png

CAPPADOCIA, Caesarea. Trajan. 98-117 AD. AR Didrachm. 21 mm 6,60 g
112-114 AD. AYTOKΡ KAIC NEΡ TΡAIANO CEB ΓEΡM ΔAK, laureate and draped bust of Trajan, r., seen from rear, globe beneath / ΔHMAΡX EX YΠATO ς, female bust (Hera ?) in chiton, holding spear in r. hand and patera in l.
RPC III, 3006;  Sydenham 196a, Metcalf Hoard 335–351 and Pl. 18–19, Metcalf Conspectus 64e, Ganschow 131d

Another mint producing great quality coins (and silver coinage). And another coin on my bucket list honorably ticked. After discussing this coin with other collectors, the reverse character is Hera, not Artemis, as mentioned in RPC. The coin has its flaws - obverse legend worn  and Hera's spear not completely visible if you don't know this type, but overall a great addition.

 

7.

image.png.239a4d9d684790398fcab213a6e0e49a.png

PONTUS. Amasia. Geta (Caesar, 198-209). Ae. Dated CY 208 (208/9). 30 mm 13.7 g
Obv: Π CЄΠTI ΓЄTAC KЄCAP. Bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust right / Rev: AΔP CЄY ANT AMACIAC MH NЄ ΠP ΠO / ЄT CH.  Altar of Zeus Strateus, on the altar a dead bull with its legs up; on the bull, an eagle, standing facing, head left, with wings spread, holding a crown in its beak; tree to left.
RG 96.

This auction was a failure for me as all my targets were lost. Not even close. But after losing an afternoon on it I decided I need to buy something, of course, if I see something I like and need. In that period I was on a Geta spree, as my only Geta coin was a provincial from Ephesos. I had no imperial coins (eventually I managed to get 2 very good ones, one with a young Geta's portrait and one with him as an adult. Still need the easiest target - one with Geta as a boy)
This coin immediately shouted "buy me". Lots of things I like about it. First, a large provincial coin. Second, a good portrait. Third, curious reverse scene and specific for this (scarce) city. Attribution was difficult as I could not find the coin anywhere so I managed to obtain the Rec Gen catalogue, which is available online for free (legally).

8.

image.png.f8482336587ddc8dbed9d2f543aecbfb.png

KINGS of THRACE. Lysimachos.(305-281 BC). Ephesos. Drachm. 18 mm, 4.2 g
Obv : Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon. / Rev : BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY. / Rev: Athena seated left on the throne, holding Nike, crowning the king's name, in her right hand and leaning with her left arm on shield decorated with lion's head, transverse spear with point below, lyre to the inner left field, A under the throne.
Thompson 174; Müller 355.

Although this is one of the first coins I had in mind when preparing my Top 10, it was not an intentional purchase. Hellenistic coins are not in my area (for now). I was in an auction, waiting for my targets (100-200 lots later). I was watching it without paying attention as I didn't intend to buy anything. While I was randomly browsing the internet, I switched to the auction tab to see what happens. Most of the lots started at 10 euros and, like many of us, I sometimes buy from impulse if I see an interesting cheap coin, even if it wasn't scheduled. Saw this coin without bids and pressed Bid. It was a dumb moment, as it's very unlikely to have a coin like this listed with a 10 euros starting price and no bids. After pressing Bid I saw the actual ... bid. 100 euros. Which is a large sum for a coin that is not scheduled. I immediately hoped somebody will outbid me. Going once, going twice, sold, face palm, banging head on desk. But after checking the beauty of this coin (and the corrosion which is much more discrete in hand) and also reading about it and comparing with other auctions, I think it's not a bad deal at all. Would I have the same opinion if the starting price was 200 euros or 250? Probably not. I reinforced a rule to myself - check at least 3 times before bidding.

9.

image.png.1e74bdc66989df10ae54839c358091e9.png

Caria. Mylasa circa 450-400 BC. Hemiobol AR. 8 mm, 0,52 g
Obv. Facing forepart of Lion. Rev. Scorpion within incuse square. SNG Aulock 7803; Klein KM 429 (Milet); SNG.Kayhan.935; Rosen 403

Another bucket list coin I finally got. I love small Greek coins and I am still amazed to see how beautiful and detailed they are. I also like coins with animals, as I mentioned. For me, this has always been an iconic Greek coin. I tried to get it many times - but the examples were either too worn/with defects or in excellent condition but very pricey. Initially I thought this is a compromise, with a good side with the scorpion and a more modest side with the lion. Actually the coin is excellent on both sides (perhaps the paw extending the flan is a defect, but certainly acceptable). My photo doesn't do justice to it - and the house's photo was even worse.

10.

image.png.6b8276b630ef9405972e03d1b14b1683.png

CILICIA. Tarsos. Mazaios (361-334 BC). Stater. 23 mm, 10.8 g. Obv: Baaltars seated left on throne, head facing, holding lotus-tipped sceptre, grain ear, grape bunch and eagle; 'BLTRZ' Aramaic legend to right. Rev : Lion left attacking bull left; Aramaic legend above 'MZDI' = Mazaios, Aramaic letters below
Casabonne Series 2A, SNG France 338-347 (controls), SNG Levante 101 var

Another Tarsos coin and another major coin for me. Always admired these types, for obvious reasons. But having one in an excellent condition is out of the question. I wanted one and I knew there is a slim chance to get a satisfying one without paying way too much, with some conditions 1. I wanted a good reverse (I consider the side with the animals the reverse) 2. it can have a test cut (this doesn't bother me) but without altering the design.
The obverse, that is worn and probably from an old die, does not bother me at all as I wanted this coin for the reverse. I can't complain about the reverse. It was, probably, the coin I expected the most in 2022, counting days, hours, minutes to the auction and hoping I will win it.

Thank you for looking and I would like to see votes and comments.

Edited by ambr0zie
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On 11/28/2022 at 6:08 AM, ambr0zie said:

Because other members started to provide their yearly Top 10 coins, I think it's a good idea to summarize how 2022 was for myself and present where does my monthly income go 🤑

I bought a lot of coins in 2022, all important for me and it is impossible to create a single Top 10. I will have a go in December also in an auction, but I don't think I will buy a Greek or Provincial coin. Not one for the Top 10 anyway. It was quite difficult even to choose 10 from these 2 categories.

From the numismatic point of view, 2022 has been an excellent year. As checked in my catalogue, I acquired exactly 100 coins. Which is more than I had in mind last year. Most of them are important coins for me - I remain a generalist collector but I have some clear specific targets (mostly Republican and Imperials, but I didn't neglect the Greek and Provincial coins at all). I was happy to add many of the clear targets and also happy about the price and general aspect of the coins.
My coins are no match for some of the extraordinary coins I see on the Forums - I don't have spectacular rarities or too many pristine condition coins, but I am very proud I managed to improve my knowledge and my collection. A good coin for me doesn't mean the coin needs to be in excellent condition - not a mandatory aspect. It needs to 1. be interesting for me (important ruler/city/historical importance, interesting design) 2. The coin is attractive enough, condition wise 3. The price is decent and satisfying - this is a major criteria. If I buy I coin I value at 100 euros with 70, I am glad. If it's 100, I'm OK. If it's 150, I hate that feeling when I know I overpaid rather than waiting and I spent some budget that could have been used for a different coin.

Here is my selection of 10 coins from the mentioned categories (I still have to consider if I create 2 separate lists for Republican and Imperial or just one). The order is the one I bought the coins in.

1.

image.png.26e540f077952a48f37eb42bb653ced8.png

Lydia. Tralleis circa 133 BC.
Cistophoric Tetradrachm AR
26 mm, 11,75 g
Magistrate Time. Cista mystica with serpent, within ivy wreath. / TΡAΛ to left of bowcase between two coiled serpents, TIME above, cult image of Artemis Anaitis standing front in right field. BMC 31-32; SNG von Aulock 8287; SNG Cop 661; Paris 2700-2701; SNG Leipzig 1269; Mionnet IV, 1026; Pinder 160; Whittall sale 1325b; GRPC Lydia S470

Although they tend to be ignored due to their artistic level being inferior compared to other tetradrachms, I consider the cistophoric tetradrachms iconic for the Greek coinage. I  liked the particularity of this coin - the cult statue. The overall aspect, with the magistrate name visible. I was a little afraid the price will rise above what I feel comfortable with, but it didn't. A cistophoric tetradrachm was an important box to be ticked.  For the future I intend to buy a non-Greek cistophoric.

 

2.

image.png.301d0cdd400326539f523fa4ce8bb945.png

Thrace. Hadrianopolis. Gordian III AD 238-244.
Bronze Æ
16 mm, 2,32 g
AYT K M ANT ΓOΡΔIANOC, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from rear/ AΔΡIANOΠOΛEITΩN, ostrich walking right
Varbanov 3833; RPC VII.2, 806; Jurukova, Hadrianopolis 676; Moushmov 2630A

From the same auction. One of the coins I immediately wanted the moment I saw it. I like coins with animals (in fact it's one of my favorite themes). And an ostrich is a very exotic animal on ancient coins. I consider this one of my best 2022 coins.

3.

image.png.501882eaeabc567e48a3d6aa3f366659.png

Seleucis and Pieria. Antioch. Trajan Decius AD 249-251.
Billon-Tetradrachm
26 mm, 12,18 g
ΑΥΤ Κ Γ ΜƐ ΚΥ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΔƐΚΙΟϹ ϹƐΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Decius, r., seen from rear; below bust: ••••• / ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ƐΞΟΥϹΙΑϹ, S C, eagle standing on palm, l., spreading wings, holding wreath in beak
Group 3, officina 5
RPC IX, 1745, Prieur 584 (15), McAlee 1126e

One thing I don't like about provincial coins (very generally speaking) is that their artistry levels (again generally speaking) are low. The reverses are sometimes generic/dull, the portraits sometimes look like they are done in a hurry. But this is not a rule and certainly not valid for Antioch. I always try to buy a Provincial coin with a well engraved, realistic portrait and a nice, interesing reverse (what I mean - not a deity standing or seated). When the coin comes in great condition (a lot of luster still visible, this is not a major criteria for me but I can't say I dislike these coins), then it becomes very tempting.

4.

image.png.b3bc369fd566499482d2eac7a6cd16fe.png

Macedon. Neapolis circa 425-350 BC.
Hemidrachm AR
13 mm, 1,68 g
Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue. Rev. N-E-O-Π Head of the nymph of Neapolis to right, her hair coiled around her head and with a bun at the back. SNG ANS 430-454.

Simple, this type has been on a top position on my bucket list. I am not a big fan of overcleaning but it is nice enough to deserve a place in the list.

5.

image.png.f9efa7b96bf8edd68caab8e17ba767e7.png

CILICIA, Tarsus. Maximinus I. 235-238 AD. AE Hexassarion. 26.1 g 37mm
Obv: ΑΥΤ Κ Γ ΙΟΥ ΟΥΗ ΜΑΞΙΜƐΙΝΟϹ Π Π, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear / Rev: ΤΑΡϹΟΥ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟ Α Μ Κ Γ Β,  the three Graces standing facing with arms around each other, one head l., the others head r., each holding flower.
RPC VI, 7113 (temporary); SNG Levante 1096, BMC 233–4

I bought this on a Sunday when I was out shopping. Got a little late and I didn't reach home in time for the auction. I was on the bus, checking the auction on my phone. Noticed it live (missed it before). One hand on the shopping bag, one on the phone, won it. It is one of the cheapest coins I bought in 2022 but I love it because of the reverse and, of course, the "abnormal" size. It will be difficult for a coin in my collection to beat this one in size/weight, especially since I don't intend to buy a Ptolemaic large coin.

6.

image.png.ad7627eaab9ca0c32d1c417471b4362a.png

CAPPADOCIA, Caesarea. Trajan. 98-117 AD. AR Didrachm. 21 mm 6,60 g
112-114 AD. AYTOKΡ KAIC NEΡ TΡAIANO CEB ΓEΡM ΔAK, laureate and draped bust of Trajan, r., seen from rear, globe beneath / ΔHMAΡX EX YΠATO ς, female bust (Hera ?) in chiton, holding spear in r. hand and patera in l.
RPC III, 3006;  Sydenham 196a, Metcalf Hoard 335–351 and Pl. 18–19, Metcalf Conspectus 64e, Ganschow 131d

Another mint producing great quality coins (and silver coinage). And another coin on my bucket list honorably ticked. After discussing this coin with other collectors, the reverse character is Hera, not Artemis, as mentioned in RPC. The coin has its flaws - obverse legend worn  and Hera's spear not completely visible if you don't know this type, but overall a great addition.

 

7.

image.png.239a4d9d684790398fcab213a6e0e49a.png

PONTUS. Amasia. Geta (Caesar, 198-209). Ae. Dated CY 208 (208/9). 30 mm 13.7 g
Obv: Π CЄΠTI ΓЄTAC KЄCAP. Bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust right / Rev: AΔP CЄY ANT AMACIAC MH NЄ ΠP ΠO / ЄT CH.  Altar of Zeus Strateus, on the altar a dead bull with its legs up; on the bull, an eagle, standing facing, head left, with wings spread, holding a crown in its beak; tree to left.
RG 96.

This auction was a failure for me as all my targets were lost. Not even close. But after losing an afternoon on it I decided I need to buy something, of course, if I see something I like and need. In that period I was on a Geta spree, as my only Geta coin was a provincial from Ephesos. I had no imperial coins (eventually I managed to get 2 very good ones, one with a young Geta's portrait and one with him as an adult. Still need the easiest target - one with Geta as a boy)
This coin immediately shouted "buy me". Lots of things I like about it. First, a large provincial coin. Second, a good portrait. Third, curious reverse scene and specific for this (scarce) city. Attribution was difficult as I could not find the coin anywhere so I managed to obtain the Rec Gen catalogue, which is available online for free (legally).

8.

image.png.f8482336587ddc8dbed9d2f543aecbfb.png

KINGS of THRACE. Lysimachos.(305-281 BC). Ephesos. Drachm. 18 mm, 4.2 g
Obv : Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon. / Rev : BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY. / Rev: Athena seated left on the throne, holding Nike, crowning the king's name, in her right hand and leaning with her left arm on shield decorated with lion's head, transverse spear with point below, lyre to the inner left field, A under the throne.
Thompson 174; Müller 355.

Although this is one of the first coins I had in mind when preparing my Top 10, it was not an intentional purchase. Hellenistic coins are not in my area (for now). I was in an auction, waiting for my targets (100-200 lots later). I was watching it without paying attention as I didn't intend to buy anything. While I was randomly browsing the internet, I switched to the auction tab to see what happens. Most of the lots started at 10 euros and, like many of us, I sometimes buy from impulse if I see an interesting cheap coin, even if it wasn't scheduled. Saw this coin without bids and pressed Bid. It was a dumb moment, as it's very unlikely to have a coin like this listed with a 10 euros starting price and no bids. After pressing Bid I saw the actual ... bid. 100 euros. Which is a large sum for a coin that is not scheduled. I immediately hoped somebody will outbid me. Going once, going twice, sold, face palm, banging head on desk. But after checking the beauty of this coin (and the corrosion which is much more discrete in hand) and also reading about it and comparing with other auctions, I think it's not a bad deal at all. Would I have the same opinion if the starting price was 200 euros or 250? Probably not. I reinforced a rule to myself - check at least 3 times before bidding.

9.

image.png.1e74bdc66989df10ae54839c358091e9.png

Caria. Mylasa circa 450-400 BC. Hemiobol AR. 8 mm, 0,52 g
Obv. Facing forepart of Lion. Rev. Scorpion within incuse square. SNG Aulock 7803; Klein KM 429 (Milet); SNG.Kayhan.935; Rosen 403

Another bucket list coin I finally got. I love small Greek coins and I am still amazed to see how beautiful and detailed they are. I also like coins with animals, as I mentioned. For me, this has always been an iconic Greek coin. I tried to get it many times - but the examples were either too worn/with defects or in excellent condition but very pricey. Initially I thought this is a compromise, with a good side with the scorpion and a more modest side with the lion. Actually the coin is excellent on both sides (perhaps the paw extending the flan is a defect, but certainly acceptable). My photo doesn't do justice to it - and the house's photo was even worse.

10.

image.png.6b8276b630ef9405972e03d1b14b1683.png

CILICIA. Tarsos. Mazaios (361-334 BC). Stater. 23 mm, 10.8 g. Obv: Baaltars seated left on throne, head facing, holding lotus-tipped sceptre, grain ear, grape bunch and eagle; 'BLTRZ' Aramaic legend to right. Rev : Lion left attacking bull left; Aramaic legend above 'MZDI' = Mazaios, Aramaic letters below
Casabonne Series 2A, SNG France 338-347 (controls), SNG Levante 101 var

Another Tarsos coin and another major coin for me. Always admired these types, for obvious reasons. But having one in an excellent condition is out of the question. I wanted one and I knew there is a slim chance to get a satisfying one without paying way too much, with some conditions 1. I wanted a good reverse (I consider the side with the animals the reverse) 2. it can have a test cut (this doesn't bother me) but without altering the design.
The obverse, that is worn and probably from an old die, does not bother me at all as I wanted this coin for the reverse. I can't complain about the reverse. It was, probably, the coin I expected the most in 2022, counting days, hours, minutes to the auction and hoping I will win it.

Thank you for looking and I would like to see votes and comments.

Ozie, You posted an interesting & eclectic group of coins 😊! I voted for the Tarsos stater because I like action scenes on coins & the Gordian III bronze with the ostrich on the reverse. The choice of an ostrich to pair with a Roman emperor is bizarre & amusing at the same time 🤣. Congrats on a great year 👍.

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1 minute ago, ambr0zie said:

You were the last hope for Decius.

Very Sad GIFs | Tenor

Sorry Ozie, I've got so many rarities of Trajan Decius from the Antioch mint I had to overlook your specimen, but I'm happy to see you added one of his Tets to your collection 🙂. I'll post a few of my Trajan Decius Tets below. 391739406_Prieur503McAlee1106a.jpg.5175b0a3638a45d7251b34c7eb9dfc83.jpg

1474661559_McAlee1106e.jpg.72cd7873eaf891e806da7afb9959ddec.jpg

855291534_McAlee1125c.jpg.04d7d97957cb20b70ddbc13ace5aff52.jpg

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Great coins, congratulations on a great coin collecting year! Always difficult to pick favorites, but no's 7 and 10 stood out for me. The scene on the reverse is not only interesting, but brutal too! You can see the legs of the bull on your coin, pointing upwards, as if it were a small puppy playing around...! And no. 10, overall quality is very nice, but the reverse scene is action packed as well, I like it! 

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  • 1 month later...

Fantastic list!!  It was difficult to pick favourites, so I voted for four: the ostrich, the Trajan Cappadocia, the Geta Amasia, and the Tarsos.

Your collecting strategy is very similar to my own, consequently we ended up with very similar Mazaios staters!

image.jpeg.05ccc77527879b7d881f0570f5e36a5c.jpeg

I must say, the dead bull on the Amasia is pretty funny - those legs sticking up! 😁

You might also get some amusement from this Trajan drachm from Cappadocia that I bid on but failed to win:

 image.jpeg.f469897373e6a2c3eec0be8166a113aa.jpeg

It went for much more than would be justified by the condition of the coin.  I wonder why? 😆

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