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Artemis Launch


Roman Collector
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Congratulations to NASA and the European Space Agency for the successful launch of Artemis and Orion!!!

Let's see your coins featuring Artemis, the goddess of the moon!
 

[IMG]
Aeolis, Kyme.
Greek Æ 15.5 mm, 3.69 g, 1 h.
Magistrate Zoilos, c. 165-90 BC.
Obv: Draped bust of Artemis, right, bow and quiver at shoulder.
Rev: One-handled vase between two laurel branches; KY above; Z-Ω/I-Λ/Ο-Σ (magistrate's name) in fields.
Refs: BMC 17.113,87-89; Sear 4193; SNG von Aulock 1642; SNG Cop 108.

 

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15 minutes ago, Roman Collector said:

featuring Artemis, the goddess of the moon!

Artemis as moon goddess is less common. Here is one:

normal_Salonina_2.jpg.6f4e6df92be80166c45e0a954c284107.jpg

 

Salonina
Tarsus, Kilikia
AE 28
Obv.: ΚΟΡΝΗΛΙΑΝ CAΛΩΝΙΝΑΝ, diademed and draped bust right, set on crescent
Rev.: ΤΑPCΟV ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩC, Α [Μ] Κ – Γ/Γ, Artemis Phosphoros with crescent advancing left.
AE, 28.36mm, 11.70g
Ref.: SNG BN Paris 1836 var.

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No Artemis, how about the moon?

Luneberg, thaler, "Man on the Moon", 1547,

D-9419

28.7 grams

1676743874_D-CameraLunebergthalerManontheMoon1547D-941928.7gKarl2-902-28-21.jpg.dca003200a9cdb2bb7c26f28cfed6a71.jpg

 

And this, Melies's wonderous and magical short movie, 120 years on:

 

Edited by robinjojo
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Great topic RC now I get to show my favorite coin of all time. Claudius I (AD 41-54). AR cistophorus (10.8gm,26mm, 6h). NGC Fine. Ephesus, ca. AD 41-42. TI CLAVD-CAES AVG, bare head of Claudius I left / DIAN-EPHE, tetrastyle temple with three steps containing central standing figure of Diana Ephesia, polos on head and fillets hanging from wrists; shield, altars, two stags and figures in pediment. RIC I 118.
Ex Heritage online auction Dec 2020, lot 61118.(10.8gm,26mm, 6h).1741068048_ephesus__3_-removebg(1).png.12121087d99b556c565d9f0af34aebf2.png

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19 hours ago, kirispupis said:

Photo I took of the IIS crossing in front of the moon.

ISS.jpg.6a8f1d36adb6f70a8e2c3e577875996f.jpg

That is an awesome and stunning lunar photo. Do you mind me asking what equipment you used? Do you have an astrophotography setup (i.e., is it a flipped telescopic image)? Did you use a DSLR time lapse?

I have not made any investments in astrophotography at this time. All I have amounts to some high powered binoculars (25x70) and a mobile phone. 😁 I used that humble setup to take this far less impressive image.

Moon2.jpg.fb7e017a4180c6ee4e01225284f9c231.jpg

 

As for moon coins, the best I can do is the only modern commemorative I've ever purchased, the 2019 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 coin.

2019_Apollo11Obv.png.88b2449f8de8dd4bbc3dd2a8d385f6b3.png2019_Apollo11Rev.png.dfc847ba4e87bbc5b95f9b01a5dbd228.png

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2 minutes ago, ewomack said:

That is an awesome and stunning lunar photo. Do you mind me asking what equipment you used? Do you have an astrophotography setup (i.e., is it a flipped telescopic image)? Did you use a DSLR time lapse?

I didn't use any astro-specific equipment. Most of the work is in software and the process was basically this:

  • There's a website (don't have the url handy) that shows lunar and solar traversals for any area. So, I was aware that at this exact second in this place, the ISS would traverse the moon.
  • Download an atomic clock app for my phone so my time is synced.
  • At the designated time (I think this was ~2 AM) go to the spot selected (in this case, a Costco parking lot) and setup.
  • Camera setup was just my 600/4 with a 2x extender mounted on a tripod. 
  • Roughly one second before the designated time, start firing, until just afterwards. The ISS is not visible with the naked eye, and it's difficult to tell from the camera whether I got it.
  • Go home to see if I was successful. I processed the photos with several different pieces of software to 
    • Align the moon in each shot
    • Combine the images of the moon to increase details
    • I then recombined individual images with the ISS at different times to show its progression across the moon
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sirakusaartemis.jpg.714e4572ff97e8d0020065aaef0e0746.jpg

 

This hemi-litron was issued during the reign of Agathokles from ca. 317-289 BC and portrays an image of Artemis or Diana, the Goddess of War -notice her quiver of arrows behind her neck. The legend Soteira translates as "saviour" The winged thunderbolt on the reverse with the monarchs' Agathokles name and title is a famous design.

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I have only a couple of coins that specifically portray Artemis (as opposed to Diana), none of them in her role as moon goddess. But here they are anyway!

Antoninus Pius, Billon Tetradrachm, Year 5 (AD 141/142), Alexandria, Egypt Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, ΑVΤ Κ Τ ΑΙΛ ΑΔΡ ΑΝΤⲰΝΙΝΟϹ / Rev. Artemis advancing right, wearing diplois (cloak) and boots, with short chiton and short peplos which flies behind, right breast bare, raising right hand to pluck arrow from quiver and holding out bow in left hand; in left field, L beneath E (Year 5). 23 mm., 13.52 g., 12 h. Emmett 1362.5, RPC IV.4 Online 14247 (temporary) (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/4/14247); Milne 1693 at p. 41 (detailed description of Artemis at p. 134); BMC 16 Alexandria 938 (at p. 109 & Pl. III) (rev. var. in placement of year). Purchased at CNG [Classical Numismatic Group, LLC] E-Auction 512, 23 March 2022, Lot 454.

image.jpeg.79d7043c973ffb83568a8dc144f7301c.jpeg

Diadumenian Caesar, AE Tetrassarion (4 Assaria), 217-218 AD, Nicopolis ad Istrum [Nikyup, Bulgaria] Mint, Moesia Inferior, Statius Longinus, Consular Legate. Obv. Bareheaded bust of Diadumenian right, draped and armored, seen from behind, M OPEL DIADOV-MENIANOC K (OV ligate) [ = Marcus Opellius Diadumenianus, Caesar] / Rev. Artemis, wearing short chiton, walking right, holding bow in left hand and drawing arrow from quiver in right hand, hound jumping behind her left foot, VΠ CTA ΛONΓINOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I / CTPΩ in exergue [ =  Consular legate Longinus, (Governor) of the residents of Nikopolis on the (river) Istros].  AMNG I/I 1843 [Pick, Behrendt, Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I  (Berlin, 1898) at p. 467]; Varbanov I 3743 [Varbanov, Ivan, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005) at p. 308]; Hristova-Hoeft-Jekov 8.25.13.3 [Hristova, H., H.-J. Hoeft, & G. Jekov. The Coins of Moesia Inferior 1st - 3rd c. AD: Nicopolis ad Istrum (Blagoevgrad, 2015)].

image.jpeg.86eb581a4842dd75112fd6652d7b99cc.jpeg

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Here's a pic of the mission flightpath.

1733449458_Artemis1missionNASAinfographic2022.jpeg.e2bfc5f6bb4d51cf705972a91ce62d6a.jpeg

 

 

 

Recent provincials with Artemis. 

selge_0.jpg.c96f96061e1fe13d109f0e0e146485a4.jpg

Pisidia, Selge. Julia Domna AE16

Obv: Draped bust r.
Rev: Artemis walking right, holding bow and reaching for an arrow from the quiver at her shoulder.

 

mytilene_1.jpg.441b9d654e910d58ebd6062898febfec.jpg

Lesbos, Mytilene. 2nd-1st century BC. A16.

Obv: Draped bust of Artemis to right, wearing stephane and with her quiver and bow over shoulder.
Rev: M-Y/T-I Kithara.

 

 

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Hi All,

Let us not forget that Artemis was the sister of Apollo.

image.png.af731fef104533936967cb2923936f19.png

image.png.0dc926392f52b5247acb375cba2ea3d9.png

Ptolemy V Epiphanes (205/204-180 BCE)
Cyrenaica, Cyrene, Bronze Weight Standard 1
Æ DIOBOL
Size: 27 mm
Weight: 13.88 g
Broucheion Collection C-2014-02-19.001


OBV: Apollo and Artemis(with bow and quiver over shoulder) jugate busts, facing right. Dotted border.
REV: Ptolemy I diademed head with scaly aegis, facing right. Legend starting in left field: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; In right field: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ. Dotted border.
Refs: Svoronos-1137, pl. xxxvi, 20-23 [13 listed]; SNG Copenhagen-454; BMC Vol06.079, #13 / BMC 29, #105; Asolati (2011), 71. Buttrey 63.

Note according to Lorber: "T.V. Buttrey (1997, p. 43), followed by M. Asolati (2011, p. 31), suggested they might reflect the marriage of Ptolemy VI to his sister Cleopatra II. The style, however, features strongly protruding chins and recalls the portraiture of the Alexandrian silver of Ptolemy V. The Apollo typology, absent from Cyrenean coinage since the reign of Magas, could allude (through the equivalence of Apollo to Horus) to the insistent identification of Ptolemy V with Horus, both in priestly decrees and on his coinage. Just as Apollo was the Greek equivalent of Horus, Artemis was identified with the Egyptian goddess Bast. The cat-headed Bast had no role in early versions of the Osirian myth, but in Ptolemaic times she was reinterpreted as the sister of Horus."


- Broucheion

 

 

 

 

 

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