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OTD: 81 CE a death, 17 years earlier a birth/ The sad story of Titus and Julia


Ryro
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In one of those, sad, funny and cruel twists of fate that the Olympians love to surprise us with, 17 years, to the day after the birth of his only child Julia Flavius, poetically with plans to celebrate his beloved daughters birthday Titus Vespasianus died of a fever.

Titus is well known for his wars with the Judeans, being the lucky man to have Mount Vesuvius erupt during his reign and dedicating his father's coliseum. 

Julia's life didn't fair any better as it was rumored that, after her father's death, her deranged uncle Domitian would force himself on her, before her suicide within a decade of her father's death. 

Enough with the humor. Let's see the coins!

The Flavian men were many things; intelligent, charismatic, strong, witty. But one thing they weren't was handsome:

Titus_Ny_Carlsberg_Glyptotek_IN3159.jpg.ae4c69b8c6c97cca5b8a3a6152545ce0.jpg

Titus was very much the spitting image of his father (or pissing image if you're aware of the smell of urine).

2117874_1629211160.l-removebg-preview.png.8d17b417cc6de28f92fce4b692404f3e.png

Titus, 79-81. Denarius (AR, 17mm, 3.2 g 6), Rome, 79. T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS Laureate head of Titus to right. Rev. TR POT VIII COS VII Venus standing right, leaning on cippus, holding helmet in her right hand and long transverse scepter in her left. BMC 255. BN 223. Cohen 332. RIC 1078. Purchased from Dara Museum Sept 2021

 

Screenshot_20220901_161952-removebg-preview.png.447576cc40ddfd6bbab04e5f77803829.png

TITUS (Caesar, 69-79). Denarius. Rome.Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS.

Laureate head right.

Rev: COS V.

Eagle standing right on altar; head turned left.

RIC² 872 (Vespasian). Condition: Very fine. Weight: 2.8 g. Diameter: 19 mm. 

share1998958325799264123.png.d722e6384e057c825720856b586cf4d9.png

Titus

 

79-81 CE Æ Sestertius (33.5mm, 22.76 g.)

Rome mint, struck AD 80-81. 

Obv. Laureate head left.

Rev. Pax standing left, holding olive branch and cornucopia.

RIC II 155 Brown patina.

 

 Julia Titi looks amazing on her busts:

1714089709_Bste_der_Julia_Titi.jpg.4acf7f3ebb84465bb8a47cfb2f65e34b.jpg

And amazingly like her father wearing a wig on coins. Those poor Flavian women:

1873310_1619626410.l-removebg-preview.png.18ce595a8191f30d6a782bd7d729227b.png

Julia Titi, daughter of Titus (died 90 AD). AR Denarius, 80-81. Obv. Bust right, draped. Rev. Venus standing right, resting elbow on column and holding scepter and helmet. RIC II-p. 1 (2nd ed.) (Titus) 388. AR. 2.83 g. 20.00 mm. R. Rare type. F. Purchased from Artemide May 2021

 

share3880164165390698058.png.354b969121f4932fba39449962ad6049.png

Julia Titi

 

(Daughter of Titus)AE Dupondius Empress. 10.76 grams 27mm

Rome AD 279-80

Obv IVLIA IMP T AVG F AVGVSTA

Draped bust of Julia right hair in bun

Rv CERES AVGVST S C

Ceres standing left holding corn ears and long torch

Sear 2615 RIC Titus 177

Former: fvrisus.rvfvs

"An extremely rare find in this denomination
Lovely emerald green patina
Julia was the daughter of Titus and later was forced to become the mistress of her uncle Domitian after he executed her husband in AD 84.
Julia was the first Augusta to have coinage issued in her own name in all 3 metals
Julia committed suicide began 89 CE-91 CE
and was deified by Domitian"

The entire Flavian dynasty (sadly, I was foolish enough to sell this one):

1873309_1619626410.l-removebg-preview.png

Vespasian, savior of the empire after the year of the four emperors.

Even professionals get the busts of Vespasian and Titus mixed up, good thing us coiniacs have the letter "T" to tell us whoes whom:

2524.jpg.5c293462995cba5b1b6012dbd5703094.jpg

Screenshot_20220901_161823-removebg-preview.png

Vespasian. AD 69-79. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.07 g, 7h). Uncertain (Ephesus?) mint. Struck AD 76. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; [annulet below] / Eagle standing left, head right, wings open, on garlanded altar; COS VI flanking. RIC II.1 1471; RPC –; RSC. Rare.

Share em if you got em!

*Edit- Ps, I'm selling both the Vespasian and Titus denarii with eagle reverse for my dad. Please reach out of interested:)

Edited by Ryro
Accidently posted while still working on this thing. IDs coming
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  • Ryro changed the title to OTD: 81 CE a death OTD: 64 a birth/ The sad story of Titus and Julia

Yes they look better worn...

Vespasian Denarius, 74
image.png.621db432bf0e622e281cd1cade1e617e.pngRome. Silver, 18mm, 3.01g. Laureate head Right; IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG. Emperor seated right on curule chair, feet on a low footstool, holding branch and sceptre; PON MAX TRP COS V (RIC II, 702). From the Westbury Sub Mendip (Somerset) Hoard 2016, Portable Antiquities Scheme: SOM-F1847A.

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  • Ryro changed the title to OTD: 81 CE a death, 17 years earlier a birth/ The sad story of Titus and Julia
  • Benefactor

I unfortunately don't have a coin of Julia, but I do have the rest of the Flavians.

vespasian.jpg.974eabf0a46adc2413f8466851f3322a.jpg

Vespasian, 69-79
AR Denarius 18 mm, 3.16 g, 7 h
Rome, 72-73
IMP CAES VESP AVG COS IIII Laureate head of Vespasian to right
Rev. VICTORIA AVGVSTI Victory walking to right, placing wreath on standard
BMC 74. Cohen 618. RIC 362
Ex Nomos

 

titus.jpg.7c1ce7e8d26149174f0ad29cea486779.jpg

Titus. AD 79-81
AR Denarius 17.5mm, 3.29 g, 6h
Rome mint. Struck 1 January-30 June AD 80
Laureate head right
Elephant, wearing armor, walking left on exergual line
RIC II.1 115; RSC 303
Ex CNG

 

Domitian.jpg.07daba19bc1d9abc376a9a45c4697216.jpg

Domitian 
AR Denarius 3.30g, 18mm, 6h.
Rome, AD 90. 
IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII, laureate head to right
IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing facing, head to right on rostral column, brandishing spear and shield, owl at her feet
RIC II.2 690; BMCRE 166; RSC 262
Ex Vitangelo Collection
Ex Roma

 

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Don't forget Domitia. But being on a limited budget, my Domitia coins are all provincial bronzes. This is the nicest -- a twofer with her husband.

[IMG]
Domitian, AD 81-96, and Domitia, AD 82-96.
Roman provincial Æ 24 mm, 9.45 g.
Cilicia, Anazarbus, city year 112 = AD 93/4.
Obv: ΑΥΤΟ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ ΥΙ ΔΟΜΙΤΙΑΝΟΣ ΣΕ ΓΕΡ, laureate head of Domitian, right; behind, star.
Rev: ΚΑΙΣΑΡΕΩΝ ΔΟΜΕΤΙΑ ⳞΕΒΑⳞΤΗ, ΙΒ-Ρ (in field; = year 112 of the city), draped bust of Domitia, left.
Refs: RPC II 1749; SNG France 2019-20; BMC 9; Ziegler 76 (obv 1/rev 3); SNG Levante 1374.

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My most recent Titus, and one of my favorites:

 

335794987_TITUSRIC112.jpg.a617c12ec330e54d8d430aeeb27264fc.jpg

 

And for some reason I cannot seem to stop buying Vespasian denarii. 😧 Got these two coming in the mail, from Savoca:

3200768_1661533514.jpg.1ab5e866414a9f62741f27a6fe7dc8eb.jpg

 

3200766_1661533513.jpg.b67df7e052d7312015b3d3c4ea817a55.jpg

 

 

The deranged younger brother - 

 

20220522_154532.jpg.d00480b1f00a5ab655d1ad24e26f225a.jpg

 

And an earlier emperor who also married one of his nieces: (After Domitian's reign, the Senate re-outlawed such unions.)

20220528_170328.jpg.2378d9fc6bc6a46408aef63f11a9033c.jpg

 

 

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image.png.d834f5f19292c905c7a79dc51bd0065d.png

Vespasian, 69 - 79 AD
AE Sestertius, Rome Mint, 32mm, 22.53 grams
Obverse: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII, Laureate head of Vespasian left.
Reverse: PAX AVGVSTI S C, Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia.

image.png.70ba3e9a59f8cd2228b5f9a8b5721b89.png

Titus AE As. AD 80. IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII, laureate head left / PAX AVGVST S-C, Pax standing left, holding branch and caduceus.

image.png.1b894b5fd8c54bf49f28030505e3cb68.png

Domitian, 81 - 96 AD
AE Sestertius, Rome Mint, 35mm, 30.75 grams
Obverse: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GER M COS XIII CENS PER P P, Laureate head of Domitian right.
Reverse: IOVI VICTORI S C, Jupiter seated left holding Victory and scepter.

 

Edited by Constantivs
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normal_Vespasian_06.jpg.b3bc434d8ed69e9048a988e819437dc0.jpg

Vespasian
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: AΥTOK KAIΣ ΣEBA OΥEΣΠAΣIANOΥ, laureate head right, date LB before
Rev.: EIPHNH, Eirene standing left, branch in right, caduceus in left
Billon, 12.65g, 23-26mm
Ref.: RPC II 2411, BMC 232, Dattari 357

 

normal_Titus_2.jpg.1fb751f512b5462954c40b3e6ceb3e7d.jpg

Titus
AR-Denar
Obv.: IMP TITUS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM, Laureate head right
Rev.: TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, Throne with round back and corn ears
Ref.: Kankelfitz 30, RIC¹ 24a, RIC² 122

 

normal_Domitian_1.jpg.053288734fb3807a711bbb751445289a.jpg

Domitian
Dupondius, AD 90-91, Rom
Obv.: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P, Radiate head right.
Rev.: FORTVNAE AVGVSTI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
AE, 12.15g, 28.2 mm
Ref.: RIC II 392; BMC 444

 

normal_R658_Domitia_fac.jpg.6cb901559f841178e21be0b956c78bac.jpg

Domitia
Ionia, Ephesus
Cistophorus (AD 82-96).
Obv.: DOMITIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
Rev.: VENVS AVG, Venus standing right, back facing, leaning upon column to left, holding helmet and sceptre.
Ag, 10.39g, 26mm
Ref.: RIC² 847 (Domitian); RPC II 870.

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Of course I love any thread that celebrates my beloved Flavian dynasty!

However, I'll take this opportunity to show off a sestertius struck by Domitian for Diva Julia Titi and attempt to debunk some of the ancient gossip surrounding their relationship.

 

D717b.jpg.a49a488ab72a78a548f98637ae2600d6.jpg

Diva Julia Titi [Domitian]

Æ Sestertius, 24.33g
Rome mint, 92-94 AD
Obv: DIVAE IVLIAE AVG DIVI TITI F above; S P Q R in exergue; Carpentum drawn r. by two mules
Rev: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P; S C, large, in centre
RIC 760 (R). BMC 471. BNC 502.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2020. Ex Agora Auctions Sale 84, 4 September 2019, lot 187. Ex CNG E314, 6 November 2013, lot 364.

Titus' daughter Julia Titi was granted the title Augusta sometime in 80 or 81 during his reign. After Titus' death she lived with her uncle Domitian at the imperial residence. In 90 or 91 AD she died and was deified by Domitian, this was commemorated on the coinage. The ancient sources are quick to malign her reputation in the name of smearing Domitian. It is said she had an ongoing affair with Domitian and became pregnant. She then was forced by Domitian to abort the baby and died during the attempted abortion sometime in 90 or 91. The Flavian historian Brian Jones has called the supposed affair between Domitian and his niece Julia (some ten or eleven years his junior) and the subsequent forced abortion which killed her as "implausible" and "nonsense". Further he wrote "Scholars seem not to have stressed one of the most significant factors in assessing the rumour's accuracy - Martial's epigram 6.3, written not long after Julia's death and deification. In it, he expresses the hope that Domitian will produce a son, implies that the baby's name will be Julius (6.3.1) and states that (the now deified) Julia will be able to watch over him (6.3.5). Martial was neither a hero or a fool. Had there been the slightest hint of an affair between emperor and niece, he would hardly have written those lines; had Julia's recent death been caused by an abortion forced on her by Domitian, would Martial have so far neglected the bounds of 'safe criticism' and common sense as to humiliate Domitia publicly, urging her to become pregnant, to give the child a name reminiscent of her husband's mistress and finally to remember that same mistress, now dead and deified (thanks to her husband), would be able to protect the child?" No doubt, the Diva coins testify that Domitian felt great affection towards his niece, however, there is no evidence that they had an illicit love affair. The incestuous rumour was safely spread after Domitian's death.

This sestertius struck for Diva Julia Titi between 92 and 94 copies an early carpentum and mules type struck under Tiberius for Diva Livia and another under Titus struck for her grandmother Domitilla. It is the second issue of this type struck under Domitian and is slightly rarer than the earlier one produced in 90-91. In the early empire the carpentum was granted to ladies of the imperial house by the Senate as an imperial honour. It was frequently used to convey an image of the deceased Divae and to symbolise the event on the coinage. The style of the Diva Julia Titi sestertii are so similar to those of the earlier Memoriae Domitilla sestertii that the RIC authors speculate a few of the older Domitilla dies were recut for Julia's issues (p. 317, note). It's astonishing to think that the mint still had access to dies that were nearly a decade old and were able to re-use them for a new issue!

 

Edited by David Atherton
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My favorite Flavians (a collecting area I like a lot)

First, Titus and Julia since they were the main characters of OP

image.png.e3e0a979eee37950518d4d0b92d31fbb.png

image.png.4ba94ece8612fd42fcb9e6b06e2d7ba5.png

(@Ryro might remember this coin very well)

 

Julia Titi

image.png.0b68cf1dad2a4f2bd83cc988474105f6.png

Domitian, uncle and lover

image.png.5043b7664220f63f1badbb726a25b3b3.png

Vespasian, capo di tutti capi

image.png.5f22fbf1477b57d836401472a1ef5bbe.png

 

And a humble Domitia provincial but I don't intend to add an Imperial so this is very good to illustrate a royal figure in my collection.

image.png.1ebdabc189f06536bdd0f7287e09ebaa.png

 

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Here some more:

VESPASIANUS:

v11_1024x497.jpg.41d38ea0343ab9a35e10e43db2688c6d.jpg

IMP CAES VESP AVG PM

TRI-POT                    3,35 gr

ROME A.D.72-73     , RIC II 37

 

TITUS

ti21_1024x489.jpg.14cbdf06431eb036a193d9671792a2b3.jpg

T CAESAR VESPASIANUS

IMP XIII           2,69 gr

RIC II  986

ti11_1024x472.jpg.c5ec3cc658afe7b67ec45de15928e8ce.jpg

IMP TITUS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM

TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP          3,01 gr

A.D.80         RIC II 112

 

DOMITIANUS

do11_1024x477.jpg.bbf8d0b93f49da8d2ceebce654f8bc44.jpg

CAESAR AVG T DOMITIANUS

COS III                       2,68 gr

A.D. 76-77                 RIC 238

 

JULIA TITI

jt11_1024x503.jpg.6dd12a8fef2cddc1a302f476dd0d6ea2.jpg

JULIA IMP T AVG AUGUSTA

VESTA / SC              11,74 gr

ROME A.D. 80-81       RIC II 398

 

 

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2 hours ago, David Atherton said:

Of course I love any thread that celebrates my beloved Flavian dynasty!

However, I'll take this opportunity to show off a sestertius struck by Domitian for Diva Julia Titi and attempt to debunk some of the ancient gossip surrounding their relationship.

 

D717b.jpg.a49a488ab72a78a548f98637ae2600d6.jpg

Diva Julia Titi [Domitian]

Æ Sestertius, 24.33g
Rome mint, 92-94 AD
Obv: DIVAE IVLIAE AVG DIVI TITI F above; S P Q R in exergue; Carpentum drawn r. by two mules
Rev: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P; S C, large, in centre
RIC 760 (R). BMC 471. BNC 502.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2020. Ex Agora Auctions Sale 84, 4 September 2019, lot 187. Ex CNG E314, 6 November 2013, lot 364.

Titus' daughter Julia Titi was granted the title Augusta sometime in 80 or 81 during his reign. After Titus' death she lived with her uncle Domitian at the imperial residence. In 90 or 91 AD she died and was deified by Domitian, this was commemorated on the coinage. The ancient sources are quick to malign her reputation in the name of smearing Domitian. It is said she had an ongoing affair with Domitian and became pregnant. She then was forced by Domitian to abort the baby and died during the attempted abortion sometime in 90 or 91. The Flavian historian Brian Jones has called the supposed affair between Domitian and his niece Julia (some ten or eleven years his junior) and the subsequent forced abortion which killed her as "implausible" and "nonsense". Further he wrote "Scholars seem not to have stressed one of the most significant factors in assessing the rumour's accuracy - Martial's epigram 6.3, written not long after Julia's death and deification. In it, he expresses the hope that Domitian will produce a son, implies that the baby's name will be Julius (6.3.1) and states that (the now deified) Julia will be able to watch over him (6.3.5). Martial was neither a hero or a fool. Had there been the slightest hint of an affair between emperor and niece, he would hardly have written those lines; had Julia's recent death been caused by an abortion forced on her by Domitian, would Martial have so far neglected the bounds of 'safe criticism' and common sense as to humiliate Domitia publicly, urging her to become pregnant, to give the child a name reminiscent of her husband's mistress and finally to remember that same mistress, now dead and deified (thanks to her husband), would be able to protect the child?" No doubt, the Diva coins testify that Domitian felt great affection towards his niece, however, there is no evidence that they had an illicit love affair. The incestuous rumour was safely spread after Domitian's death.

This sestertius struck for Diva Julia Titi between 92 and 94 copies an early carpentum and mules type struck under Tiberius for Diva Livia and another under Titus struck for her grandmother Domitilla. It is the second issue of this type struck under Domitian and is slightly rarer than the earlier one produced in 90-91. In the early empire the carpentum was granted to ladies of the imperial house by the Senate as an imperial honour. It was frequently used to convey an image of the deceased Divae and to symbolise the event on the coinage. The style of the Diva Julia Titi sestertii are so similar to those of the earlier Memoriae Domitilla sestertii that the RIC authors speculate a few of the older Domitilla dies were recut for Julia's issues (p. 317, note). It's astonishing to think that the mint still had access to dies that were nearly a decade old and were able to re-use them for a new issue!

 

 That's fascintating @David Atherton. I've ever only heard one side of the argument.

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image.jpeg.a5bb904e19b18db538533b7b4c0523a3.jpeg

Iulia Flavia Titi
Denarius of the Roman Imperial Period 80/81 AD
Material: Silver
Diameter: 19mm
Weight: 3.39g
Mint: Rome
Reference: RIC II Part 1 (second edition) Titus 388
 
 
14 hours ago, Ryro said:

before her suicide within a decade of her father's death. 

I thought she had died as a result of a miscarriage (Suetonius). Where does this information come from? Do you have a link? That's very interesting, I didn't know about the suicide.

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Vespasian

152991744_RIC_II_1_1542_av.jpg.e0e813c1db13c86d446844cb1ca5f3b7.jpg

1077812825_RIC_II_1_1542_rv.jpg.fe33f05eccf97508292fbeefd65e4366.jpg

1734095978_Rand_RIC_II_1_1542.jpg.c1468008814f823a4fa1521608a81e9d.jpg

Vespasian
Denar (Antiochia 70 n.Chr.) 3,48g, 18mm,
Av.: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Rv.: VIRTVS AVGVST
RIC II 1² Vespasian 1542 (R2)

Titus

735484969_RIC_II_1_20_av.JPG.97f7719609a7941e9d38f841a1c3207c.JPG

1292164114_RIC_II_1_20_rv.JPG.5358435a07c097aa81cb28e06f02277d.JPG

1655574040_Rand_RIC_II_1_20.jpg.b62cd31c71d68d3e6be8a62e69d70dd8.jpg

Titus
Denar (Rom 79 n.Chr.) 3,24g, 18mm,
Av.: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M
Rv.: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P
RIC II 1² Titus 20 (R2)

Domitian

1488494714_RIC_II_1_791_av.jpg.3db55a9116d20a931789b680dceec1a3.jpg

1933560064_RIC_II_1_791_rv.jpg.68fc31a051f3d98f2f719582151d7935.jpg

570192932_Rand_RIC_II_1_791.jpg.ab5fbfcf81e523181d8d529a13140eb4.jpg

Domitian
Denar (Rom 95 n.Chr. - 96 n.Chr.) 3,15g, 20mm,
Av.: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV
Rv.: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P
RIC II 1² Domitian 791 (C)

With kind regards from Germany

 

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Cool thread. I was never that into collecting the Flavians, save for Domitian.  Most of my scant holdings are unphotographed.  I think I have an As of the Domitian Secular games, a past present.

Here's some mostly scarce yet decrepit Flavians of mine:

dom212.jpg.a1d205c268d8ba4ade771112c27a6f69.jpg

DOMITIAN AE drachm. ALEXANDRIA, Egypt. Struck regnal year 15, 95-96 AD. AVT KAI S QEO VVIOS DOMIT SEB GERM, laureate head right. Reverse - Domitian seated right in biga drawn by two centaurs; LIE in exergue. Köln 406; Dattari 453; Milne 523; Emmett 253. 35mm, 28.3g.
 

dom252.jpg.d103c0bd10a366e1de4f5b94d5da16e4.jpg

DOMITIAN AE orichalcum sestertius. Struck 81-82 AD shortly following Domitian's accession, at a Balkan mint probably located in Bithynia. IMP DOMITIAN CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS, laureate head right. Reverse - Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak over left shoulder, advancing right, holding transverse spear in right hand and trophy in left, large SC in fields. RIC II 449 (Lugdunum), BMCRE II 517 (Lugdunum), RPC II 531 (Thracian Mint, 3 examples known to RPC), CBN 552 (Bithynia). Large 36mm flan, 23.7g.

The Balkan Perinthus? mint.  I snagged a Nero Perinthus Sestertius during the 1990's.

 

 

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5 hours ago, friedberg said:

Vespasian

152991744_RIC_II_1_1542_av.jpg.e0e813c1db13c86d446844cb1ca5f3b7.jpg

1077812825_RIC_II_1_1542_rv.jpg.fe33f05eccf97508292fbeefd65e4366.jpg

1734095978_Rand_RIC_II_1_1542.jpg.c1468008814f823a4fa1521608a81e9d.jpg

Vespasian
Denar (Antiochia 70 n.Chr.) 3,48g, 18mm,
Av.: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Rv.: VIRTVS AVGVST
RIC II 1² Vespasian 1542 (R2)

Titus

735484969_RIC_II_1_20_av.JPG.97f7719609a7941e9d38f841a1c3207c.JPG

1292164114_RIC_II_1_20_rv.JPG.5358435a07c097aa81cb28e06f02277d.JPG

1655574040_Rand_RIC_II_1_20.jpg.b62cd31c71d68d3e6be8a62e69d70dd8.jpg

Titus
Denar (Rom 79 n.Chr.) 3,24g, 18mm,
Av.: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M
Rv.: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P
RIC II 1² Titus 20 (R2)

Domitian

1488494714_RIC_II_1_791_av.jpg.3db55a9116d20a931789b680dceec1a3.jpg

1933560064_RIC_II_1_791_rv.jpg.68fc31a051f3d98f2f719582151d7935.jpg

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Domitian
Denar (Rom 95 n.Chr. - 96 n.Chr.) 3,15g, 20mm,
Av.: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV
Rv.: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P
RIC II 1² Domitian 791 (C)

With kind regards from Germany

 

Nice coins, like always. Glad that you've joined numisforums, too 😉

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Here is my one coin of Julia Titi:

Julia Titi Flavia (daughter of Titus), AE Dupondius 80-81 AD, Rome Mint. Obv. Draped bust right with hair bundled high in front and coiled in chignon high in back, IVLIA IMP T AVG F AVGVSTA/ Rev. Vesta seated left, holding palladium in right hand and long transverse scepter in left arm, VESTA below, S C across fields. RIC II.1 398 at. p. 223 (Titus) (2007 ed.), old RIC II 180 (Titus) (1926 ed.), Sear RCV I 2617 (ill.), BMCRE Titus 257. 26 mm., 12.23 g., 6 h.*

Julia Titi - Vesta dupondius jpg version.jpg

*According to David Sear (RCV I at p. 480), Julia Titi was born "about AD 65," so she would have been only about 14 or 15 when this coin was issued, during her father's lifetime, after she was granted the title of Augusta. (See the obverse inscription for both those facts.)

As I discussed in a post on Coin Talk a couple of years ago, as much as I like the coin plates (many in color) in the book Women of the Caesars by Giorgio Giacosa (published in English translation in 1977 from the Italian book first published in 1960), I think the author's repeated efforts to judge the characters of various empresses and other royal women by their appearances on particular coins often come across as somewhat peculiar and extremely misogynistic, even for the era. As impassioned as his efforts may have been. For example, this type of Julia Titi dupondius is Plate XX in the book. At page 40, he calls it "the only coin of Julia that has iconographical interest." After stating that she was only 12 or 13 when the coin was issued (a low estimate), the author states that "The passion for her thirty-year old uncle which would change her life in such a tragic way began then in her adoloscent mind. Even if among the Romans, as among all southern people, women matured rather early, the face of this coin is still the fat and insignificant countenance of a little girl. Her complicated hairstyle, the first of those fantastic and complicated hairdos adopted by Julia during her short life, does not make her look grown up." He then describes the hairstyle at great length. To be fair, he does state that Julia's coins do not do her justice, because "statues and cameos show us a beautiful and refined woman," even though the "taste of the period demanded buxom women, and in all her portraits Julia conforms."

As I also discussed in that thread, this constitutes unalloyed praise next to the author's commentary, on the next page, about an aureus showing Domitian and Domitia. He argues that "a couple as odious in appearance as this does not exist in all Roman iconography." Specifically regarding Domitia, he states that her face "is less fearsome and bestial" than Domitian's, "but just as cold and hateful." Below her hair -- which he says might be a wig -- there "appears the heavy and capricious face of a virago to whom the engraver, out of spite, has given the same features as Domitian." Thus, her face "takes on, in the eye of the observer, an equivocal unnatural element which makes one think more of a transvestite than a woman." To me, she just looks a little chubby and plain! Talk about basing broad conclusions on slender evidence.

In any event, here is my one coin depicting Domitia, a Provincial from Anazarbus in Cilicia that also depicts her husband on the obverse. @Roman Collector has posted the same type.

Domitian and Domitia, AE 22.7, 93/94 AD, Cilicia, Anazarbus. Obv. Laureate head of Domitian to right, AYTO KAI ΘΕ YI ΔOMITIANOC CE ΓEP around from upper right / Rev. Draped bust of Domitia left, date IB P (= Year 112, = 93/94 AD)* across fields, star behind head, KAICAPEΩN ΔOMETIA CEBACTH around from lower left. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. II 1749; RPC Online at https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1749 ; SNG Levante 1367 [Levante, E., Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia (Zurich, 1986)] (see https://cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=40245); BMC Vol. 21 Lycaonia, Anazarbus 9 p. 32 [Hill, G.F., A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia (London, 1900)]. 22.7 mm., 10.09 g.  (Purchased from Zuzim Inc, Brooklyn, NY Jan. 2021; exported from Israel 2016 pursuant to IAA [Israel Antiquities Authority] Export License No. 531619, April 17, 2016.) (Double die-match to RPC II 1749, specimen no. 16; see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1749.)

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*Year 1 of era was 19 BCE, date of founding of Anazarbus after visit of Augustus.

I'll pass for the moment on posting my other Flavian coins, of Vespasian and his two sons, because I've posted most of them quite recently and repeatedly. Including my gold aureus of Vespasian with the 1910 provenance to the Vicomte de Sartiges collection!

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