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An inexpensive Claudius I just liked the look of


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My Claudius has a less flattering patina.

Claudius Sestertius with PROB Countermark, 41-50image.png.16acf684cf423796813be77de450ab5e.pngRome. Bronze, 24.75g. Laureate head right; TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP. Oak-wreath; EX SC OB CIVES SERVATOS (RIC I, 96). After the conquest of AD42, large quantities of early OB CIVES SERVATOS (without PP) were issued for Britain, all countermarked PROB.

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I like the look of it @lordmarcovan

Also, welcome aboard! Glad to see you here.

I will share my lone Claudius. Not much to look at but he's what I got for now 🙂

 

841198170_ClaudiusAsMinerva.png.723e0771b5fbd084f691b7c8a96ac481.png

Claudius
AE As
Obverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP P P, bare head left
Reverse: Minerva walking right, holding shield and brandishing a javelin, S-C across fields

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I have one, too!

Claudius LIBERTAS AVGVSTA as.jpg
Claudius, AD 41-54.
Roman Æ as, 10.86 g, 28.3 mm, 7 h.
Rome, AD 42.
Obv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head, left.
Rev: LIBERTAS AVGVSTA SC,Libertas standing right.
Refs: RIC 113; BMCRE 202-5; Cohen 47; CBN 230-2; RCV 1860.

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I haven't had a chance to properly photograph this one(the reverse was taken beneath a plastic flip; creating a glare along the top).

However, wanting to contribute to this thread, here it is:

ClaudiusAs.jpg.380e2a6b0b2aac09a930daaafd8de5f0.jpg

Claudius. (AD 41-54). Æ As. (30mm, 10.80g). Rome mint.

(Struck AD 42-43).

O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P; Bare head left.

R: LIBERTAS AVGVSTA / S - C; Libertas standing right, holding pileus in right hand and extending left arm.

RIC 113

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Inexpensive too and I liked the patina.

claudius.jpg.eadbe47e9fd61d5e5b577ed3927fecde.jpg

Claudius AE As.

Obv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR IMP, bare head left.
Rev: S-C across field, Minerva standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield on left arm.

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On 7/17/2022 at 11:47 PM, Octavius said:

 An As of Claudius I got from CGB that I just liked the look of .

brm_576407.jpg.11fadac6a42f5ad2d376235fdcc8a704.jpg

Now that is an attractive coin. I bet even Agrippina and Messalina liked it... at one time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My two examples

Copper Coin (AE as) minted at Rome during the reign of CLAUDIUS between 41-50 A.D. Obv. TI.CLAVDIVS.CAESAR.AVG.P.M.TR.P.IMP. Bare head left. Rev. LIBERTAS.AVGVSTA.S.C. Libertas, dr., stg. Facing, head right, holding pileus, l. extended; S—C to l. and r. RCS #638. RICI #97 pg.128. DVM #16 pg.82. RCS #1859.

ADA-332 OBV.jpg

ADA-332 REV.jpg

ADB-333 OBV.jpg

ADB-333 REV.jpg

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On 7/17/2022 at 5:16 PM, John Conduitt said:

Claudius Sestertius with PROB Countermark

Nice countermark! I don't think I've ever had a PROB. I do have a Claudius Sestertius (imitative / "unofficial mint" / "branch mint") with the much more common NCAPR countermark. Host coin's a bit worn but the countermark is very clear.

It's interesting that your PROB is right on the face. Happily, these NCAPR countermarks are never on the face (at least as far as I've been able to tell). They're usually behind the head, occasionally on the reverse, and very rarely in front of the bust (but never on the face).

For one so common, there have been some interesting debates about what exactly it means and when it was struck. Mine is from the Richard Baker Collection, the Los Angeles area collector known for his important scholarly collection of countermark coins (CNG photo):

image.jpeg.0f14d131fd6470719b6eb8718370d645.jpeg

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That's a very clear countermark.

4 hours ago, Curtis JJ said:

Host coin's a bit worn but the countermark is very clear.

It's interesting that your PROB is right on the face.

Yes as mentioned often online (see the note here https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=240438) R. F. Kenyon, who wrote about PROB, claimed "the countermarks were carefully applied, always in the right obverse field and never overlapping the imperial portrait. Coins were countermarked before they had seen much, if any, circulation."

Obviously, he hadn't seen my coin 🤣

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