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Opinions on having numismatics in resume?


JayAg47

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Im just wondering if any of you have put Numismatics or coin collection in the interest/hobby section of your resume? 
I’m in STEM, and my specialty has absolutely nothing to do with numismatics, let alone ancient coins. I’m afraid if I put coin collection as one of my interests, perhaps potential recruiters will thinks it’s just childish to collect coins (some of us are really familiar with the reactions we get when we show coins to our family/friends). But on the other hand I want to emphasise my extensive knowledge of coins, especially ancient coinage and their associated history, which would make me look like a well rounded candidate? 

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1 minute ago, JayAg47 said:

Im just wondering if any of you have put Numismatics or coin collection in the interest/hobby section of your resume? 
I’m in STEM, and my specialty has absolutely nothing to do with numismatics, let alone ancient coins. I’m afraid if I put coin collection as one of my interests, perhaps potential recruiters will thinks it’s just childish to collect coins (some of us are really familiar with the reactions we get when we show coins to our family/friends). But on the other hand I want to emphasise my extensive knowledge of coins, especially ancient coinage and their associated history, which would make me look like a well rounded candidate? 

I see no harm in doing that, I've done it in the past 😉.Use Numismatics instead of "coin collection", you'd be surprised how many job recruiters don't know the meaning of Numismatics 🤣.

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Great question, @JayAg47

At my latest position as senior artist on staff — the personnel director would frequently ask my opinion when reviewing resumés of summer recruits. If I had seen the word “numismatics” on any of the applicant resumés, I would certainly have been impressed.

 

Edited by LONGINUS
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An interesting idea, but I never have put any interest in coins anywhere near my resume. There is no problem doing so, but it has nothing whatsoever to do with my career and I would hate it to distract from other interview questions. If I applied somewhere that involved coins, then I would definitely highlight it.

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recruiters won't be looking at your resume for very long, so they're mainly going to be looking at your skills, experience, and education if you're a new grad. it's not really going to hurt, but it's irrelevant and won't really help either if you're applying to STEM positions.

Edited by Cordoba
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It never once occurred to me to put anything about outside interests or hobbies on a resume, whether numismatics or genealogical research. Lawyers aren't supposed to have outside interests, or show anything but a single-minded devotion to the pursuit of one's profession through the accumulation of billable hours. As the saying goes, "the Law is a jealous mistress." Fortunately for you, however, you're not a lawyer!

Edited by DonnaML
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I cite my published papers on my resume and LinkedIn. Fortunately every job I've had in the decade I've been collecting has been found through personal connections and I haven't actually had to submit a resume and hope it gets through to a recruiter, but I think it can be a good thing to show something you're passionate about especially if it can illustrate good technical writing or analytical skills.

Edited by red_spork
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I suppose it depends.

In the UK, at least in some sectors, showing interests outside the primary profession is fashionable and nearly essential. This has different purposes, including the ability to cope with burnout/mental health issues - modern-day epidemics. It is hard to predict how numismatics and other collecting hobbies would be seen, especially if employers have lived experiences with spouses-collectors 🙂

I have not seen people putting collecting shoes or magnets on CVs. Numismatics may be seen differently, but it would be helpful to make a twist on how the hobby is presented to demonstrate the desirable qualities.
 

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There are quite a few of us that are in STEM areas.

I have a BSc Hons in Mathematics and have working in Engineering (Software, Systems, Engineering Management) for too many (>35) years.

I don't have it on my CV but it has come up in discussion. I don't change job often enough to need to keep my CV up to date.

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Not sure if it would have any impact. Positive or negative. Of course, I am only talking about jobs that are not connected to numismatics, in any way. 

It can do you no harm, I think, but the only advantage you might get is IF the recruiter is also a collector or if the boss is, so you will "stand out" from the crowd of resumes. But not decisively. It would be unfair if the job has nothing to do with it. 

I do not work in HR/recruiting but from what I spoke with various people with HR/recruiting jobs, selecting resumes for interviews usually means that the responsible people read the resumes in a fast pace. Does this person have the relevant experience? Yes/no. Relevant skills? Yes/no. Usually nobody analyzes the resumes in detail. If at the initial check your skills seem to  fit, you will be selected for next step - the interview. 

At the job interview, that's a different story. In 90% of the initial interviews, I was asked about my hobbies. Not because they actually cared on a human level. They want to see first if you can express yourself freely in a coherent way and you're not just a robot. And they want to see how is your life outside the office. 

A few years ago, at a job interview, I was asked about my hobbies and of course I told them, briefly. The other person seemed intrigued in a positive way and we had a 3 minutes chat. But I know the final decision had nothing to do with this. 

Another thing, on a side note - some recruiters ask you about hobbies also because they want to understand if the hobby would interfere with your professional life. 

In my youth I was playing bass in a band. The job was connected with music so the hobby was not irrelevant. One of the things that contributed to failing in getting that job at the interview  was:
Recruiter: So does your band have any plans? Concerts, tours, perhaps an album?
Me: yes, we are still rookies, but we have local gigs and in half a year or perhaps 1 year we might record an album. And we are open for small tours (for the moment) in the neighboring towns. 
Recruiter: That's cool! but tell me, if you have to record the album, this means lots of time in the studio (I nodded). Also if you have tours this would mean that for a few days you can't come to work. What would you do if we have a tight deadline at work, where your presence is necessary and in the same time you have a tour? 

My answer was that I would try to fulfill both tasks, but at that moment I really wasn't sure what is the correct choice (in the end I was not selected for the job and not long after I ended my brief musical career). 

The only time when mentioning this would not be a good choice is, for example, in the past you had a job that was related to numismatics. If you aim for an unrelated job, software tester (random example) and the interviewer sees that you are skilled and passionate about numismatics, you worked in this before also, he/she might wonder what would you do if you are offered again a numismatic job. This will not be in your advantage. 

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I have "Ancient Coin Collecting" down as a hobby in my CV (IC design - as noted above, quite a few engineers collect coins).

It's quite a while now since I've changed job, but at one interview the HR interviewer remarked on it - her late father had collected military buttons.  I got that job, though I don't think the coins and buttons were a big factor in that.   I remember a long time ago ('89) talking about telescope mounts and the aurora borealis in interviews as astronomy was an interest at the time (still is, but on the back burner) and there's no harm at all in talking about something you're interested in.

I can't recall any CVs we get here mentioning ancient coin collecting, but I would see that as a plus - people hire people like themselves.  At one time, we half-jokingly decided we needed another runner for our 5K relay team and asked anyone who mentioned running as a hobby about their times, etc. 😄  In fact, our team never took to the field (or track) - our keenest runner has since left (he told me he suggested running at lunchtime to his new colleagues and got blank looks) and the rest of us are aged and slowing, so I might be better off getting people interested in coins.

ATB,
Aidan.

Edited by akeady
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It looks like I'm in the same boat as many others here. I'm a software engineering manager who does hire people, and to be honest I wouldn't care if I saw "ancient coin collector" on a resume, even though I collect myself. If I did care, that would be "bias" and everyone is entitled to a fair shake. I also never ask anyone about hobbies or anything personal at an interview. If he/she is hired, then I'll delve into hobbies to get to know the person better.

In truth, the only parts of a resume I really pay attention to are recent experience if an industry hire or internships/projects if a university hire. I don't even pay much attention to schooling because most universities are awful in terms of teaching how to write production code.

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