Jump to content

This coin is a worthless cull. Totally ruined, no detail remaining! And I'm keeping it.


Finn235

Recommended Posts

Sometimes when buying large lots, you will get coins like this

ZomboDroid_23092023052537.jpg.222716ad47bf861053a946b585cbb7f4.jpg

This AE20 was probably a Greek coin at some point judging by the thickness (and weighing in at probably 8g before losing so much of the patina) and coins like this tend to just get passed around and around, used only to bump up the coin count in lots and entice bidders to bid just a little higher. As I was prepared to carry on the tradition, I noticed the tiniest little sparkle on the coin and decided to give it a closer look and then research what I saw.

On one side, there are two crystals, one whitish and one more clear (difficult to see in the photo) which I believe are cerussite (PbC03) - a natural lead ore, probably originatinf from impurities in the coin, or something lead touching it in the ground.

20230923_171634.jpg.5955ebabf717695ab6195b80bc8ca0a8.jpg

On the other side is a reddish black crystal which I believe is cuprite (Cu2O), a natural ore of copper

20230923_171452.jpg.b6dbbaed0edf48c8dfc22009a8ae5030.jpg

Neither of course will restore any numismatic value to the coin, but I still think it's interesting enough to hold on to. I tend to forget while collecting XF denarii just how long 2,000 years really is. To overly-romanticize the whole thing, it made me stop and think about all the work that went into mining and refining and minting this coin, only for nature to return those metals back to their natural state.

Anywho, anyone else have coins with cool mineral/crystal growths on them? Post 'em up!

  • Like 15
  • Cool Think 3
  • Shock 1
  • Mind blown 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This fourree Tiberius denarius got some copper sulfate growing out from one of its exposed core. Along with a tiny red crystal that shines under sun light (looks better in hand than photo). 
IMG_6388.jpeg.6fcc2b514d7c0a33aa337398a4d91131.jpeg
here’s a closer look 

 

 

 

IMG_6394.jpeg.effaffab13286031eade48aa28a09862.jpeg.705313ac1a1fdc4c655869d1202c3adf.jpeg

Edited by JayAg47
  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, that coin looks like a 3D relief of an alien moon!

I immediately think of Chinese coins for this sort of thing.  Definitely some sort of crystally thangs going on here, on this early Chinese bronze cowrie:

image.jpeg.0b9faf611a1df22a446b76165606663e.jpeg

 

Must be some interesting minerals on this heavy (9.45g) early Qin ban liang, c. 350-300 BCE:

image.jpeg.d2b4c9d5795833e40c5e59c73fafc47f.jpeg

 

And for a different sort of adhesion, check out the actual ancient fabric at the top of the reverse of this Han ban liang (H7.17, c. 175-120 BCE):

image.jpeg.7e910a1accdc8abd69f32078207d8e65.jpeg

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Severus Alexander said:

Wow, that coin looks like a 3D relief of an alien moon!

I immediately think of Chinese coins for this sort of thing.  Definitely some sort of crystally thangs going on here, on this early Chinese bronze cowrie:

image.jpeg.0b9faf611a1df22a446b76165606663e.jpeg

 

Must be some interesting minerals on this heavy (9.45g) early Qin ban liang, c. 350-300 BCE:

image.jpeg.d2b4c9d5795833e40c5e59c73fafc47f.jpeg

 

And for a different sort of adhesion, check out the actual ancient fabric at the top of the reverse of this Han ban liang (H7.17, c. 175-120 BCE):

image.jpeg.7e910a1accdc8abd69f32078207d8e65.jpeg

I'll need to hunt down the picture, but probably about 6 years ago I bought 200ish Song dynasty cash from Lanz's ebay shop with the intent of making a collection of it. Sat on it for a year, realized that Chinese didn't "click" for me outside of Wang Mang's coinage, and I sold most of them to an interested local collector on FB marketplace. One of the coins was completely encrusted in this absolutely stunning electric blue azurite like that Ban Liang, but brighter. I regret that I sold that one.

  • Gasp 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't kept a coin only because of the deposits, but this one comes close. I don't know what these minerals are but they seem to appear regularly on coins (as above), so are presumably copper-based - cuprite (Cu2O) and malachite (Cu2CO3(OH)2), together with blue, yellow and green toning?

Commodus Denarius, 186-187
image.png.10e1f08f77b4459a81db7d5c269913c2.png
Rome. Silver, 18mm, 2.75g. Laureate head right; M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT. Felicitas, draped, standing left, holding caduceus in right hand and sceptre in left hand; PM TR P XII IMP VIII COS V PP (RIC III, 143)

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Caracalla-198-217-BillonTetradrachm-LaodiceaadMare-29mm14.88g-4thconsulshipcfPrieur1179.jpg.83f872fe4eef6307ace07fa028690453.jpg

I bought this Caracalla Tetradrachm because it was uncleaned.  The white stuff at the top of the bust is actually a bit glossy.  It reminds me a lot of calcite, seen in mine exploration videos of wet mines.

KhrusruII-ARDrachm33mm3.88ggreenZurqieh15d.jpg.c411f7ccf897ce53b1f921513a0e446d.jpg\

I bought this inexpensive throw-in, because of the verdigris.

 

Patina is also mineralization.  It's just (sometimes) prettier.

JustinII-AE20nummia-Thessalonica-greatgreenpatina.jpg.78182da24e9a14544eaf0ddbc3572bbf.jpg

Purchased 100% for the patina.

 

Ditto:  I don't know if the unusual, variegated patina was caused by the cleaning process, but it was inexpensive and interesting enough to plop into the basket.

GordianIII-AESestertius-34mm23.57g12h-RICIV290a-verydifferentvariegatedpatina.jpg.cb538cf1b3f419125e0f41e09ef18557.jpg

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my contribution. This coin is actually in really good shape, but it's got scattered deposits/mineral growths that make it even more interesting. I especially like the reddish deposit on the obverse that serves as Kore's eye, and the large inset "emerald" at 7 o'clock on the reverse. 😉

Agathoklesae15kore-bull.jpg.a28b95c62f13640fb13548f1b3e69816.jpg

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

Interesting thread and great coins!  

The oxidation process, where the metals are exposed to air, water and other chemical, converts these metals to their oxide/sulfide forms, probably as they were before extraction and refining.  The exception are metals found in their native state. such as silver and copper.  Gold is always in its native state, since it does not oxidize.

Azurite

D-CameraAzurite9-24-23.jpg.58bb367c730f5ff54421fa1d5f9d85c9.jpg

I created a thread on CT dealing with this subject back in September 2020.

https://www.cointalk.com/threads/the-beauty-of-impermanence.367521/

We have oxidation to thank for the wonderful patinas on our bronze and silver coins, an attribute that greatly increases the beauty and value of a coin when it is at its best, such as an even emerald green patina on a Roman sestertius.  Even oxidation creating multi-color earthen patinas can be very impressive.

Fausta, AE 18, Thessalonica Mint, 326-328 AD.

D-CameraFaustagradientAE18ThessalonicaMint326-328AD12-14-20.jpg.f7f68a9c3de1ed401e460562931b567b.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by robinjojo
  • Like 7
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...