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New Philip I Provincial


DonnaML
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This coin arrived in the mail today; it was the one coin I bought at the recent Nomos Obolos auction. I have plenty of Philip I coins already, including several other Provincials (see below), but the great condition for a Provincial coin, as well as the reverse design depicting both a bull and a lion, flanking a personification of Moesia, appealed to me. As did the Latin inscription, signaling "colonial" status.

Philip I, AE 23 (Dupondius), 244 AD [City Year 5], Viminacium, Moesia Superior (Provincial capital) [nr. Kostolac, Serbia]. Obv. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, IMP IVL PHILIPPVS PIVS FEL AVG PM [PM = Persicus Maximus] / Rev. Moesia standing facing, head left; to left, bull standing right; to right, lion standing left; P M S C – OL VIM [Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium] around; in exergue, AN V [Year 5]. 23 mm., 8.11 g., 1 h. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. VIII Online 2383 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/2383 ); AMNG I/I 97 (p. 39) [Pick, Behrendt, Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I  (Berlin, 1898)]; Varbanov 131 [Varbanov, Ivan, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005)]; H & J 25 [Hristova, Nina and Gospodin Jekov, The Local Coinage of the Roman Empire - Moesia Superior, VIMINACIUM (Blagoevgrad, 2004)]. Purchased from Nomos AG Obolos Auction 23, 12 Jun 2022, Lot 576.

image.jpeg.4466983d17467fe6ea10e6c32c44f376.jpeg

(See also photo online at https://www.acsearch.info/image.html?id=9589061 .)

Here are my other Philip I Provincials (with footnotes omitted):

Philip I Billon Tetradrachm, 247 AD [Year 3], Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤΟΚ Κ Μ ΙΟΥΛΙ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Eagle standing right, wings spread with left wing behind leg, head right and holding wreath in beak, ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ƐΞΟΥϹΙΑϹ ΥΠΑ ΤΟ Γ [= Year 3]; in exergue in two lines: ΑΝΤΙΟΧΙΑ/ S C. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. VIII Online 29005 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/29005 ); Prieur 368, McAlee 908 (ill. p. 335) (Series 4, Group (b), Type 2). 26.5 mm., 10.40 g., 7 h.

image.jpeg.458190856a90837876010298eb40f9e8.jpeg

Philip I AE Octassarion (8 Assaria), Second Issue, AD 247-249, Syria, Seleucis & Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, ΑΥΤΟΚ Κ Μ ΙΟΥΛΙ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Turreted and draped bust of Tyche right; above, ram leaping right with head turned back left; star below bust; ΑΝΤΙΟΧƐΩΝ - ΜΗΤΡΟ ΚΟΛΩΝ around; Δ – Ɛ [Delta – Epsilon] across upper fields; S - C across lower fields. 30 mm., 15.68 g. McAlee 990 (ill. p. 345) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; RPC VIII Online (unassigned, ID 7493) (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/7493); BMC 20 Syria 526 [Warwick Wroth, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 20, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria (London, 1899) at p. 215]. Purchased from Kenneth W. Dorney, Feb. 2022.

image.jpeg.2ca7c1379e2f888a38755c24b7b2f3c1.jpeg

Philip I & Otacilia Severa, AE 26, 244-249 AD, Mesembria, Thrace [Nessebar, Bulgaria]. Obv. Confronted busts of Philip I, right, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Otacilia Severa, left, wearing diadem (or stephane), ΑΥΤ Μ ΙΟΥΛ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟC Μ WΤ; in exergue (in two lines) ϹƐΒΗΡΑ-ϹƐ / Rev. Nemesis standing facing, head left, holding marked cubit rule with extended right hand and bridle* with left hand, wheel at her feet left, ΜΕ-ϹΑΜ-ΒΡΙΑΝΩΝ. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. VIII Online 48407 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/48407 ); SNG Cop. 664 [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Copenhagen, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Part 6: Thrace 1: The Tauric Chersonese-Thrace (Mesembria) (Copenhagen 1942); Varbanov 4254 [Ivan Varbanov, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia) (Bourgas, 2005)]. [Obv. Die match: Naumann Auction 49, Lot 354, Jan. 8, 2017 (RPC VIII Online ID 48407, Specimen 17; see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/obv/333697/high.]  26 mm., 10.5 g.

image.jpeg.1adb3a96120dbeb01861b5f16baa9e48.jpeg

And two Provincials of his son:

Philip II, AE Tetrassarion, 247-249 AD, Moesia Inferior, Tomis [now Constanţa, Romania]. Obv. Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, Μ ΙΟΥΛ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟC ΚΑΙCΑΡ / Rev. Griffin seated left with right paw on top of wheel [representing Nemesis*], ΜΗ-ΤΡΟ-Π-ΠΟ, continued in exergue in two lines: NTOΥ ΤΟΜΕ/ΩϹ (ME ligate), Δ in right field [signifying the denomination, 4 assaria]. 27 mm., 12.22 g. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] VIII Online 28171 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/28171) [this coin is Specimen 7, used as primary illustration for type, see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coin/156187 ]; Varbanov 5781 [Varbanov, Ivan, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005)]. Purchased from Herakles Numismatics, Jan. 2021; ex. I-Nummis, Paris, Mail Bid Sale 6, Nov. 7, 2008, Lot 399  (see https://www.coinarchives.com/a/openlink.php?l=239902|348|399|a3b582d0b87f863b39d084dd851a7a89). [“Scarce”: 11 specimens in RPC (including this coin), 6 examples in ACSearch (including this coin).]

image.jpeg.8015914521d7c9662967a6ece7453b74.jpeg

Philip II, billon Tetradrachm, 248-249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, AYTOK K M IOΥΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB / Rev. Eagle standing facing, head right, wings spread, holding wreath in its beak, ΔHMAΡX EΞ OYCIAC YΠA TO Δ [4th consulship]; ANTIOXIA / S C in two lines below eagle.  Prieur 474 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]; BMC 20 Syria 560 [Warwick Wroth, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 20, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria (London, 1899) at p. 218] McAlee 1042 (Series 5) (ill. p. 353 ) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; RPC VIII No. 29020 (https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/29020).  27.15 mm., 14.00 g.  Ex. CNG Electronic Auction 466, April 22, 2020, part of Lot 728.

image.jpeg.6d41b0305cea6d681ed7286af5d9c8bc.jpeg

Please post your Roman Provincials of Philip I and his family, and/or your coins of any ruler minted in Viminacium.

Edited by DonnaML
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16 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

This coin arrived in the mail today; it was the one coin I bought at the recent Nomos Obolos auction. I have plenty of Philip I coins already, including several other Provincials (see below), but the great condition for a Provincial coin, as well as the reverse design depicting both a bull and a lion, flanking a personification of Moesia, appealed to me. As did the Latin inscription, signaling "colonial" status.

Philip I, AE 23, 249 AD [Year 5], Viminacium, Moesia Superior (Provincial capital) [nr. Kostolac, Serbia]. Obv. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, IMP IVL PHILIPPVS PIVS FEL AVG PM [PM = Parthicus Maximus] / Rev. Moesia standing facing, head left; to left, bull standing right; to right, lion standing left; P M S C – OL VIM around; in exergue, AN V [Year 5]. 23 mm., 8.11 g., 1 h. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. VIII Online 2383 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/2383 ); AMNG I/I 97 (p. 39) [Pick, Behrendt, Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I  (Berlin, 1898)]; Varbanov 131 [Varbanov, Ivan, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005)]; H & J 25 [Hristova, Nina and Gospodin Jekov, The Local Coinage of the Roman Empire - Moesia Superior, VIMINACIUM (Blagoevgrad, 2004)]. Purchased from Nomos AG Obolos Auction 23, 12 Jun 2022, Lot 576.

image.jpeg.4466983d17467fe6ea10e6c32c44f376.jpeg

(See also photo online at https://www.acsearch.info/image.html?id=9589061 .)

Here are my other Philip I Provincials (with footnotes omitted):

Philip I Billon Tetradrachm, 247 AD [Year 3], Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, ΑΥΤΟΚ Κ Μ ΙΟΥΛΙ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Eagle standing right, wings spread with left wing behind leg, head right and holding wreath in beak, ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ƐΞΟΥϹΙΑϹ ΥΠΑ ΤΟ Γ [= Year 3]; in exergue in two lines: ΑΝΤΙΟΧΙΑ/ S C. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. VIII Online 29005 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/29005 ); Prieur 368, McAlee 908 (ill. p. 335) (Series 4, Group (b), Type 2). 26.5 mm., 10.40 g., 7 h.

image.jpeg.458190856a90837876010298eb40f9e8.jpeg

Philip I AE Octassarion (8 Assaria), Second Issue, AD 247-249, Syria, Seleucis & Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, ΑΥΤΟΚ Κ Μ ΙΟΥΛΙ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟϹ ϹƐΒ / Rev. Turreted and draped bust of Tyche right; above, ram leaping right with head turned back left; star below bust; ΑΝΤΙΟΧƐΩΝ - ΜΗΤΡΟ ΚΟΛΩΝ around; Δ – Ɛ [Delta – Epsilon] across upper fields; S - C across lower fields. 30 mm., 15.68 g. McAlee 990 (ill. p. 345) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; RPC VIII Online (unassigned, ID 7493) (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/7493); BMC 20 Syria 526 [Warwick Wroth, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 20, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria (London, 1899) at p. 215]. Purchased from Kenneth W. Dorney, Feb. 2022.

image.jpeg.2ca7c1379e2f888a38755c24b7b2f3c1.jpeg

Philip I & Otacilia Severa, AE 26, 244-249 AD, Mesembria, Thrace [Nessebar, Bulgaria]. Obv. Confronted busts of Philip I, right, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Otacilia Severa, left, wearing diadem (or stephane), ΑΥΤ Μ ΙΟΥΛ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟC Μ WΤ; in exergue (in two lines) ϹƐΒΗΡΑ-ϹƐ / Rev. Nemesis standing facing, head left, holding marked cubit rule with extended right hand and bridle* with left hand, wheel at her feet left, ΜΕ-ϹΑΜ-ΒΡΙΑΝΩΝ. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] Vol. VIII Online 48407 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/48407 ); SNG Cop. 664 [Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Copenhagen, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Part 6: Thrace 1: The Tauric Chersonese-Thrace (Mesembria) (Copenhagen 1942); Varbanov 4254 [Ivan Varbanov, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia) (Bourgas, 2005)]. [Obv. Die match: Naumann Auction 49, Lot 354, Jan. 8, 2017 (RPC VIII Online ID 48407, Specimen 17; see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/obv/333697/high.]  26 mm., 10.5 g.

image.jpeg.1adb3a96120dbeb01861b5f16baa9e48.jpeg

And two Provincials of his son:

Philip II, AE Tetrassarion, 247-249 AD, Moesia Inferior, Tomis [now Constanţa, Romania]. Obv. Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear, Μ ΙΟΥΛ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟC ΚΑΙCΑΡ / Rev. Griffin seated left with right paw on top of wheel [representing Nemesis*], ΜΗ-ΤΡΟ-Π-ΠΟ, continued in exergue in two lines: NTOΥ ΤΟΜΕ/ΩϹ (ME ligate), Δ in right field [signifying the denomination, 4 assaria]. 27 mm., 12.22 g. RPC [Roman Provincial Coinage] VIII Online 28171 [temporary ID number] (see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/28171) [this coin is Specimen 7, used as primary illustration for type, see https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coin/156187 ]; Varbanov 5781 [Varbanov, Ivan, Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior (English Edition) (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005)]. Purchased from Herakles Numismatics, Jan. 2021; ex. I-Nummis, Paris, Mail Bid Sale 6, Nov. 7, 2008, Lot 399  (see https://www.coinarchives.com/a/openlink.php?l=239902|348|399|a3b582d0b87f863b39d084dd851a7a89). [“Scarce”: 11 specimens in RPC (including this coin), 6 examples in ACSearch (including this coin).]

image.jpeg.8015914521d7c9662967a6ece7453b74.jpeg

Philip II, billon Tetradrachm, 248-249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch Mint. Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, AYTOK K M IOΥΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB / Rev. Eagle standing facing, head right, wings spread, holding wreath in its beak, ΔHMAΡX EΞ OYCIAC YΠA TO Δ [4th consulship]; ANTIOXIA / S C in two lines below eagle.  Prieur 474 [Michel and Karin Prieur, Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms (London, 2000)]; BMC 20 Syria 560 [Warwick Wroth, A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 20, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria (London, 1899) at p. 218] McAlee 1042 (Series 5) (ill. p. 353 ) [Richard McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (2007)]; RPC VIII No. 29020 (https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/type/29020).  27.15 mm., 14.00 g.  Ex. CNG Electronic Auction 466, April 22, 2020, part of Lot 728.

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Please post your Roman Provincials of Philip I and his family, and/or your coins of any ruler minted in Viminacium.

Donna, Your latest score is a handsome provincial, but the hefty octassarion is my favorite 😊.

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Beautiful coin. The similarity of this VIM coin type for several rulers makes it quite special. Here are two more.

 

normal_Gordianus_III_R625.jpg.397ad654247a406f883a2d1123894d36.jpg

Gordianus III
Moesia Superior, Viminacium
AD 239-40
Obv.: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: P M S COL V M (missing I), Moesia standing, head left, extending hands to bull and lion standing at feet to either side; AN • I • in exergue.
AE, 22 mm, 5.79 g
Ref.: Varbanov I 104

 

normal_Hostilian_001.jpg.95d939d01b7a43ca0835cd90a640f88e.jpg

Hostilian
Moesia Superior, Viminacium
AD 250
Obv.: C VAL HOST M QVINTVS CAE, draped bust right.
Rev.: PMS COL VIM/ AN XII = year 12, AD 250, Moesia Superior standing between lion and bull
AE, 25.7 mm, 11.44 g
Ref.: Varbanov I 200, Moushmov 52

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Thanks, @shanxi. I did not realize that the bull and lion flanking Moesia is a type used in Viminacium for other emperors, not only Philip I. Do you happen to know when the design first appeared, or how long it continued? 

I admit that every time I see the year in the exergue of a Roman Provincial coin rendered as "AN V" or "AN I" or the like, my instinctive reaction is to think "Why is this inscription in French?!"

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This reverse with bull and lion was the trademark of the mint. Coins with this reverse were issued for Gordian III, Philip I, Otacilia Severa, Philip II, Decius, Herennia Etruscilla, Herennius Etruscus, Hostilian, Trebonianus Gallus, Volusian, Aemilian, Valerian, Mariniana and Gallienus.

Here is my year IV Gordian III (spelled IIII - before collecting, I was sure Romans were using today's convention IV not IIII, XIX not XVIIII)

image.png.d366ab4d3364b14e567ce8d0dc24415f.png

 

This reverse design was used (or, actually, copied by) Provincia Dacia coins. My Volusian is worn and difficult to photograph but you can see the similarities.

image.png.da5140fe2da1482bd446bce7db1e3ffc.png

https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/9/110

better examples to be seen there. The animals on the reverse are an eagle and a lion for this mint - symbols of legions V and XIII.

 

Edited by ambr0zie
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Nice scores @DonnaML. I have a Philip I from Viminicium though not nearly as sharp as yours. I got mine in a lot that worked out to about $10 per coin so I was still quite happy with it.

4032C296-9C84-45B9-9724-331FCEC3B6F8.jpeg.b7386f7211ac8848932a8214573b7870.jpeg

Roman Empire
Philip I, AD 244-249
AE30, Viminacium mint, MOESIA SUPERIOR
Dia.: 30 mm
Wt.: 17.4 g
Obv.: IMP M IVL PHILIPVS AVG
Rev.: PMS COL VIM
Ref.: Martin 2.10.1, Varbanov 132

Just for good measure I’ll also post my much loved Antioch tet.

821F6B0A-B163-4C2A-9CB7-250E11F8D87A.jpeg.90ae98b72935188835f0081ea5ce0636.jpeg

Roman Empire
Philip the Arab
AR Tetradrachm, Seleucia and Pieria, Antioch mint, struck ca. AD 247
Dia.: 28.1 mm
Wt.: 11.47 g
Obv.: AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟC CЄB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
Rev.: ΔΗΜΑΡX ЄΞOYCIAC ΥΠΑ ΤO Γ / ANTIOXIA / S C, Eagle standing left, head right, with wings spread, holding wreath in beak.
Ref.: Prieur 370; McAlee 902

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Nice coins everybody, here my 4 provincials of Emperor Philip from 4 different mints

Emperor Philip I. - Tetradrachm - Antioch mint

976402800_PhilipAntioch.png.1d8101776c57ba2251e8b686d98f16c6.png

Emperor Philip I. - Sestertius - Viminacium mint

Phillipp.png.9b898601a2f1edaaeedc5b0ca1f11ce9.png

Emperor Philip I. - Provincial bronze - Cyrrhus mint

1519805886_PhilipCyrrhus.png.4af07bc53c05e290f7ad528c96e2bfc0.png

Emperor Philip I. - Provincial bronze - Nisibis mint

720514632_PhilipNisibis.png.93972546a9fcbe1db6a6ce4d1852261d.png

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The bull and lion represent particular legions which were numbered on coins of Gordian III:

GordianIII5ViminaciumLegions9533.jpg.7e4ade74d3fd61384a11031f4e8498ff.jpg

Gordian III, 238-244. 28 mm. 21.24 grams.
Legion IIII Flavia and legion VII Claudia Pia Flavia
Year IIII = 242/3.

Grant, Army of the Caesars, p. 233.
ex Berk 85, lot 542.
 

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Posted · Supporter

LOVE the type and yours is STUNNING, Donna! Wonderful artistry on the lion and bull😍

Here's my old friend Phil

Screenshot_20200918-202600_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.89587958e993d5aa46af918d6e8cc7d0.png

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His wife

Screenshot_20200918-202408_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.1a0267718836a62a364e27a48d84af4f.png

And son

Screenshot_20200918-202934_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.59e86d9036922bbe021b85b7f0d85cf2.png

Screenshot_20200918-202504_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.bea4b3528b04b591e3c2b474dcbf92f7.png

And a whole Viminacium family!

Screenshot_20200918-203829_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.f12b8bac52594555b62dc660785f1abc.png

Screenshot_20200918-203139_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.65a221d530fd4702dc1f5bf10d824ce6.png

Screenshot_20200918-203032_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.4dc6eba578619215211220fc1cc3d990.png

Screenshot_20200918-203313_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.b12318d37464b605b97470464f220861.png

Screenshot_20200918-203223_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png.13fbb3bc400c36959b75306eb53687f0.png

Edited by Ryro
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Posted · Benefactor
Posted (edited)

Donna => fantastic OP-coins (great thread)

 

Ummm, hopefully these babies are welcome in your sweet thread? (

 

SYRIA, Seleucis and Pieria, Philip I (below)

Æ 8 Assaria

AD 244-249

Antioch mint

Diameter: 30 mm

Weight: 16.39 grams

Obverse: Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Philip I right

Reverse: Turreted, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right; above, ram leaping right, head left; Δ-Є and S-C across field

Reference: McAlee 990

Other: 6h … earthen green patina, areas of light roughness

Ex-stevex6

 

Syria Gordian Tyche.jpg

 

MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. Philip II. As Caesar Æ Pentassarion (below)

AD 244-247

Diameter: 27 mm

Weight: 13.73 grams

Obverse: Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust of Philip II right, facing draped bust of Serapis left, wearing calathus

Reverse: Serpent coiled left; E (mark of value) to right

Reference: H&J 6.44.22.2; Varbanov 2100

Other: 2h ... green-brown patina

Ex-stevex6

Moesia Inferior Philip II.jpg

 

Philip II. As Caesar, Æ Sestertius (below)

244-247 AD

Rome mint, 3rd officina. 4th emission of Philip I, AD 245

Diameter: 30.5 mm

Weight: 20.36 grams

Obverse: Bareheaded and draped bust right

Reverse: Philip II standing right, holding spear and globe

Reference: RIC IV 255a; Banti 10

Other: 2h )... dark gray and brown patina, areas of light roughness, hairline flan crack

Ex-stevex6

Philip II Sestertius Spear and Globe.jpg

Edited by Steve
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Thanks to everyone for showing your wonderful coins. And thank you, @dougsmit and @Valentinian, for explaining that the dates on the coins of Viminacium represent the city year rather than the regnal year -- I admit I was confused as to why my Year 5 coin was attributed by the dealer to AD 243/44 rather than 249, but didn't research it -- as well as the symbolism of the lion and bull. This is the relevant Numiswiki entry, at https://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=Viminacium :

"Viminacium, a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. and the capital of the Roman province of Moesia Superior, was located about 20 km to the east of modern Kostolac, Serbia. Coins are known of the emperors from Gordian III with dates AN I, Anno Primo, (year 1, autumn 239 - autumn 240 A.D.) to Valerian and Gallienus AN XVI, Anno Sexto Decimo, (year 16, autumn 254 - autumn 255 A.D.). The usual reverse legend on the colonial coinage is P. M. S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual reverse type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull, and sometimes holding standards inscribed VII and IIII. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII Claudia and IV Flavia Felix, which were quartered in the province."

Anyone interested in the symbols of the different legions can look at the list of the legions and their emblems depicted in the Gallienus legionary series, set forth at http://www258.pair.com/denarius/cgi-bin/erfind.pl?sstring=legio+milan. Note that several animals served as the emblem of more than one legion --  for instance, the bull was the emblem for at least three legions [VII, VIII, and X]. 

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This might be a good place to mention that there are similar looking coins that are not from Viminacium.  This Volusian is from the Province of Dacia and has an eagle and lion.  The year 5 date shows that a different system of reckoning the year was in place there. 

po2530bb1980.jpg.02247fba20f4c081e636d2b69df3d1fc.jpg

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Marsyas Mike said:

Nice additions to your fine collection @DonnaML  Not sure if you knew about this site, but it is really helpful when figuring out those Viminacium issues;  http://www.viminacium.nl/English index.html

 

 

Thanks for the very helpful link, @Marsyas MikeI was not familiar with it, and there is a lot of useful information that caused me to alter my write-up of my coin in several respects. See  the discussion of Philip I's Viminacium coins at http://www.viminacium.nl/English Philippus I.html:

1. Because Philip didn't take the throne until March 244, his Viminacium coins of City Year 5 were issued only beginning in that month and until the summer of 244, so my coin dates from AD 244, not 243/244.

2. I'm not used to thinking of Roman Provincial coins, even from colonies, in terms of Imperial denominations. But it seems that just as with Imperial coins, given the radiate bust, my coin is a dupondius. Bronze coins from Viminacium with laureate busts are asses. 

3. The site points out that "the portrait of Philip on this [type] still has some of the looks of Gordian III because the die cutters did not yet know what the emperor looked like." I think this is probably correct -- the nose certainly looks more like Gordian III's than what I'm accustomed to seeing for Philip I.

4. The "P M" in the obverse inscription stands for Persicus Maximus ["greatest conqueror of the Persians"], not Parthicus Maximus, for the obvious reason that the Parthian Empire had been replaced by the Sassanids (centered in Pars) twenty years earlier.

5. The title "P M" disappeared from Philip I's Viminacium coins before the end of Year 5: because the peace with Shapur I after Gordian III's death was bought by Philip with a large sum of money, the characterization of Philip as the "conqueror of the Persians" was apparently too big an exaggeration for even the Romans to countenance. 

Edited by DonnaML
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Philip I Ar Tetradrachm Rome 244 AD Obv Bust right laureate draped and cuirassed seen from back. Rv eagle standing facing head left with wreath in beak and with wings open. Prieur 310 10.58 grms 24 mm Photo by W. Hansen

anttdphilipsnr3.jpg.adc37c07e5d155dcf0e895d56c8e6a8a.jpg

This coin helps illustrate the complexity and interdependence of Roman mint operations in the mid third century AD Not only do you have eastern style tetradrachms minted at Rome but Roman style antoninianii minted at Antioch. 

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6 hours ago, kapphnwn said:

Philip I Ar Tetradrachm Rome 244 AD Obv Bust right laureate draped and cuirassed seen from back. Rv eagle standing facing head left with wreath in beak and with wings open. Prieur 310 10.58 grms 24 mm Photo by W. Hansen

anttdphilipsnr3.jpg.adc37c07e5d155dcf0e895d56c8e6a8a.jpg

This coin helps illustrate the complexity and interdependence of Roman mint operations in the mid third century AD Not only do you have eastern style tetradrachms minted at Rome but Roman style antoninianii minted at Antioch. 

How is it known that this coin was minted in Rome?

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8 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Thanks for the very helpful link, @Marsyas MikeI was not familiar with it, and there is a lot of useful information that caused me to alter my write-up of my coin in several respects. See  the discussion of Philip I's Viminacium coins at http://www.viminacium.nl/English Philippus I.html:

1. Because Philip didn't take the throne until March 244, his Viminacium coins of City Year 5 were issued only beginning in that month and until the summer of 244, so my coin dates from AD 244, not 243/244.

2. I'm not used to thinking of Roman Provincial coins, even from colonies, in terms of Imperial denominations. But it seems that just as with Imperial coins, given the radiate bust, my coin is a dupondius. Bronze coins from Viminacium with laureate busts are asses. 

3. The site points out that "the portrait of Philip on this [type] still has some of the looks of Gordian III because the die cutters did not yet know what the emperor looked like." I think this is probably correct -- the nose certainly looks more like Gordian III's than what I'm accustomed to seeing for Philip I.

4. The "P M" in the obverse inscription stands for Persicus Maximus ["greatest conqueror of the Persians"], not Parthicus Maximus, for the obvious reason that the Parthian Empire had been replaced by the Sassanids (centered in Pars) twenty years earlier.

5. The title "P M" disappeared from Philip I's Viminacium coins before the end of Year 5: because the peace with Shapur I after Gordian III's death was bought by Philip with a large sum of money, the characterization of Philip as the "conqueror of the Persians" was apparently too big an exaggeration for even the Romans to countenance. 

I'm glad you found that site useful - whenever I get a coin from Viminacium I go to it.  However, the last this happened, back in April, the site was done, which was disappointing, as it is very helpful for these issues.  About a week ago I checked again and found it was back up - I've made pdf "save" pages for some of the site, and I need to do more in case it vanishes again.  

All my coins from Viminacium come from big, low-grade lots of the sort I like to buy off eBay.  Identifying these can be a challenge given their condition, but that viminacium.nl site is a huge help.  To illustrate, here are a few low-grade Viminaciums (Viminacii?) I doubt I could've identified without that site:

105779284_Viminacium-PhilipIlotFeb2021(0).jpg.57e393ad57f9b87a603fb6204c8cb139.jpgPhilip I   Æ Sestertius Year 9 (247-248 A.D.) Viminacium, Moesia Superior IMP [M IVL P]HILIPPV[S AVG], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PMS CO LVIM, Moesia standing, holding hands over bull and lion, [AN VII]II in exergue. Pick 105; Varbanov 138.  (16.37 grams / 25 mm) eBay Feb. 2021 Attribution Notes: Reverse year in exergue is hard to see; given "II" at right edge, it seems likely VIIII is the year, as other years do not extend as far over.  Along those lines, it  could be year VIII as well.

 2022301156_Viminacium-HerenniaEtruscillalotFeb2021(0).jpg.f7ac9a8b3505274b30b34a918e8b60c4.jpg

Herennia Etruscilla      Æ Sest. Year 12 (250-251 A.D.) Viminacium, Moesia Superior H[ER E]TRVSCIL[LA AV] draped bust right /  PMS C OLVIM, Moesia standing between bull and lion, holding right hand over bull, left hand over lion, AN XII in ex. Pick 137 var.; Varbanov 179 (13.60 grams / 25 mm) eBay Feb. 2021    Attribution Note:  "The bust on this coin is not seen from behind but from the front. The hairdress of the empress is the same as on the year XI coin so this is probably an early issue from year XII...The reverse has a tall Moesia  with her head breaking the reverse legend.." viminacium.nl website

This one might be a die-match to the example on the site; the position of the bull's legs helped ID it:

858364082_Viminacium-GordianIIIsestlotSep2020(0).jpg.273849bfa47487ae06ba8f29ab12320b.jpg

Gordian III Æ Dupondius  Viminacium, Moesia Superior Year 2 (240-241 A.D.) IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / PMSCO LVIM, Moesia stdg. facing, bull and lion either side. AN II in exergue. Pick 77 var.; Varbanov 109. (6.23 grams / 21 mm) eBay Sep. 2020 Attribution Note:  "Remark: The bull on the left side of Moesia is standing with both front legs on the ground." viminacium.nl website  This appears to be an obverse die match to this site's example. 

 Here's the obverse die-match comparison with the example on the viminacium.nl site; both have some wonky lettering obverse that seem to match; not on the reverse, however: 

1133136853_Viminacium-GordianIIIsestlotSep2020(diecomp).jpg.4cdda172997e68bfb28775f2fe958a00.jpg

 

 Finally, this one, a Gordian III that is so off-center I couldn't identify it for sure; it has my favorite Viminacium portrait, however.  

216262160_Viminacium-GordianIIIasJan19(0).jpg.34f5f6ddceec10b8c4d7f7787ef2fba7.jpg

Gordian III   Æ 19 As Year 1 (?) (238-239 A.D.) Viminacium, Moesia Superior IMP CAES M ANT [GORDIANVS AVG], laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / PMS CO L VIM, Moesia stdg. facing, bull and lion either side. [AN dot I? - year off flan] in ex. AMNG 73 (uncertain attrib.). (3.07 grams / 19 mm) eBay Jan. 2019

 

 

 

Viminacium - Gordian III sest lot Sep 2020 vimin site die matc.jpg

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In answer to @DonnaML there are two The first is the inscription seen below the eagle on the reverse. It reads MON VRB (Moneta Urbana) or Money of the City. Some of the contemporary tetradrachm minted during the reign of Philip I carry the legend ANTIOXIA or of Antioch. This is an example that was at one time in my collection 

Philip I Ar Tetradrachm Antioch Obv Bust right laureate draped and cuirassed. four pellets below bust Rv Eagle standing slightly to the left wings spread. 10.5 grms 24 mm Prieur 494 THIS IS NO LONGER MY COIN

Xanttdphilipsnr4.jpg.38df7cff217e8b472079ebfd68c8a938.jpg

The second is style. If you examine the portrait on the coin above and compare it with the example I cited from the mint of Rome you will see a very distinctive difference in style. The issue labeled ANTIOXIA all have a style quite different from that of the MON VRB coins. In fact it is this consistency in style that allows us to identify a number of issues of antoninianii stuck during the reigns of Gordian III, Philip Decius and Gallus as being products of the mint of Antioch. The MON VRB coins have a style more consistent with that of Rome. When comparing these coins to contemporary coins of similar diameter from the mint of Rome one can clearly see the similarity anttdphilipsnr3.jpg.acd37d010baf53a65dc12101cdcf6ec8.jpg

My coin as noted above

77000974.jpg.72ae9814336d465bc861dcac9c18f23d.jpg

 

Dupondius of Philip I RIC 162 c 12,37 grms Photo CNG Triton XI Lot 974 January 7 2008 THIS IS NOT MY COIN

You can see the close similarity in the style of portraits of Philip  between the Mon VRB Coin and the dupondius minted in Rome.

 

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