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Post your fossils, minerals and crystals


expat
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Aside from coins, my Wife and I collect these. Some are found in the wild and others are gifts from clients. I will start with a mixture and please post whatever you think relevant.

 

 

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Cool fossils!.   I think we both know how lucky we are to live in a country that is abound with fossils...

Here's a few I've stumbled across ...

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The top left and sausage shaped pieces are coral which I found 150 km inland !

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25 minutes ago, Spaniard said:

Cool fossils!.   I think we both know how lucky we are to live in a country that is abound with fossils...

Here's a few I've stumbled across ...

20220225_133427.jpg.72ad470944ee0a6b04001a34de56ebbe-2.thumb.jpg.12c0753d9a9e72df418977d971c98063.jpg

The top left and sausage shaped pieces are coral which I found 150 km inland !

Some nice pieces there. Where you used to live, Nijar, there is an old dormant volcano that is constantly disgorging garnets. After a rain the ground is covered with them. We collect them in there hundreds and have a deal with a jewellery manufacturer in Germany who purchases those that can be faceted and polished,

 

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This is part of my Aquarium...

upload_2020-12-28_18-36-36.png
Fossil Diplomystus Dentatus Fish 53.5M-48.5M BCE 37mm x 10mm Green River Formation Wyoming USA

 

I lived in NC for 10 years.  My wife found this on the beach...

Black Shark Tooth.
:)
Fossil - Great White Shark Tooth 43x29mm.jpg
Fossil - Great White Shark Tooth 43x29mm

Edited by Alegandron
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FOSSILS: (are these reasonably correct attributes?)

My wife dug these out on her recent Utah trip with one of our Granddaughters...
Trilobite ex rock Pre-Cambrian 521M-252M BCE  25x34x4mm Utah USA.jpg
SPECIES: Elrathia Kingi
CLASS: Trilobita
AGE: Middle Cambrian ( circa. 509 - 497 Million BCE)
LOCATION: Utah
FORMATION: Wheeler Formation
SIZE: 25x34x4mm
NOTE: Specimen removed from original concretion.
Utah USA

Trilobite in rock Pre-Cambrian thru Devonian 521M-252M BCE  33x42mm Utah USA.JPG
Trilobite in rock Pre-Cambrian thru Devonian 521M-252M BCE 33x42mm Utah USA

Edited by Alegandron
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I've attempted to photograph some of the numerous minerals populating parts of the house, with varying success.

Here's a recent attempt:

Laguna nodular agate, SiO2 (quartz), Chihuahua, Mexico

1464588377_D-CameraLagunaAgateChihuahuaMexicofloatercenter3-2-22.thumb.jpg.15b699b6f325bff6b5c8d9a7752f9815.jpg

 

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A fossil fish from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Eocene Period, around 50 million years old:

Fossils 2.jpg

 

The one on the left is a coiled ammonite. I think that's fossilized wood on the upper right.

Fossils 1.jpg

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(please excuse the crappy photos shot on my phone)

This is a pair of fossil ferns from the Llewellen formation in St. Clair, PA (300 million years old). I wouldn't call these especially rare, but the parcel of land in St. Clair where these fossils used to be found everywhere is no longer open to the public. I bought these because I loved the contrast between the white fossils and the black shale. They are each about 10-1/2 inches wide.

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Edited by Numisnewbie
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54 minutes ago, Numisnewbie said:

(please excuse the crappy photos shot on my phone)

This is a pair of fossil ferns from the Llewellen formation in St. Clair, PA (300 million years old). I wouldn't call these especially rare, but the parcel of land in St. Clair where these fossils used to be found everywhere is no longer open to the public. I bought these because I loved the contrast between the white fossils and the black shale. They are each about 10-1/2 inches wide.

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They are stunning, like the cameo on a proof coin.

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These are fossilised sea urchins (echinoidea). Here in Spain they are called Herizos de mar, or, hedgehogs of the sea as urchin is an old world name for hedgehog, taken from old  French herichun  and Latin ericius  both meaning hedgehog.

 

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I have some cool fossils that I bought, but of course it's much more fun when you find them yourself, so I'll show those instead.  First off is a bunch of shark teeth from a famous site called Big Brook in central New Jersey.  The sharks and other marine fossils found here are from the end of the Cretaceous period (c.66 million years old).  This is a RIker mount display case of just shark teeth from the site (I've also found various fish fossils, a few types of shells, and even a couple of mosasaur teeth (an extinct group of swimming reptiles- think crocodiles with flippers instead of legs).  While these are easily recognizable as sharks, the particular species are all extinct:

image.jpeg.5456e478f70d0b59de52864259d45730.jpeg

Next is a site closer to where I live now, the Calvert Cliffs of the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.  This site is of Miocene age (c. 14 million years old).  Many of the shark teeth and other fossils are from species that still exist.  In the group below, the sharks include the extinct Snaggletooth shark, an extinct Mako relative, and an extinct Tiger, while extant (still-living) species include Tiger, Sand Tiger, Bull, Hammerhead, Six-gill, and Angel sharks.  The bottom rows also include sting ray, drumfish, barracuda, and porpoise.

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There are no fossils found in or immediately around Baltimore City (no exposures of fossil-bearing rocks), but there are a few minerals around.  My local city park has lots of mica that weathers out after storms.  Here's a few pieces I've found (they are about 2 inches [5 cm] long):

image.jpeg.a6df58aa524442e46625f1e72d258324.jpeg

 

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29 minutes ago, Parthicus said:

I have some cool fossils that I bought, but of course it's much more fun when you find them yourself, so I'll show those instead.  First off is a bunch of shark teeth from a famous site called Big Brook in central New Jersey.  The sharks and other marine fossils found here are from the end of the Cretaceous period (c.66 million years old).  This is a RIker mount display case of just shark teeth from the site (I've also found various fish fossils, a few types of shells, and even a couple of mosasaur teeth (an extinct group of swimming reptiles- think crocodiles with flippers instead of legs).  While these are easily recognizable as sharks, the particular species are all extinct:

image.jpeg.5456e478f70d0b59de52864259d45730.jpeg

Next is a site closer to where I live now, the Calvert Cliffs of the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.  This site is of Miocene age (c. 14 million years old).  Many of the shark teeth and other fossils are from species that still exist.  In the group below, the sharks include the extinct Snaggletooth shark, an extinct Mako relative, and an extinct Tiger, while extant (still-living) species include Tiger, Sand Tiger, Bull, Hammerhead, Six-gill, and Angel sharks.  The bottom rows also include sting ray, drumfish, barracuda, and porpoise.

image.jpeg.5674cb94427d8a3b2460831a9e88e626.jpeg

 

There are no fossils found in or immediately around Baltimore City (no exposures of fossil-bearing rocks), but there are a few minerals around.  My local city park has lots of mica that weathers out after storms.  Here's a few pieces I've found (they are about 2 inches [5 cm] long):

image.jpeg.a6df58aa524442e46625f1e72d258324.jpeg

 

An impressive display

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Agate is something that fits well on this site. Ornamentally, it was used for the seal stones of Ancient Greek warriors and is part of Minoan history. Before that, to the 3rd Millennium BCE, polished agate was used  as jewellery in the Indus Valley Civilisation.

 

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All are from manufacturing processes r R&D that I've worked on.  Primarily high tech ceramic materials, SiC, various stabilized and partially stabilized ZrO2 minerals, a borosilicate based glass ceramic, and a couple copper trees from a plating process.They may look natural but aren't. 

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