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What is your best buy in 2022?


Coinmaster
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Hi all, what was your best buy in 2022? Cheap or expensive doesn't matter, please just show the coin you're most happy about!

I'm very happy with this coin from Trajanus, which I bought for 275,- Euro via ma-shops.com. What I like is that both front and backside have enough details and that all the letters are readable. It's about my most expensive coin, but I think it's worth the price for this famous emperor.
Background info: https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces253046.html and https://numismatics.org/ocre/id/ric.2.tr.151

PS: I got a (maybe stupid) question about the text on the front side. The letters are: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, what's translated as: Imperator Traiano Augustus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate, Consul Quintum, Pater Patriae. But I thought the name of the emperor is Traian (Trajan) or Trajanus, not Traiano (which seems to me Italian instead of Latin). Shouldn't it translate into: Imperator Traianus Optimus, Augustus, Germanicus, (etc.)?

 

Trajanus.jpg

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@Coinmaster..

Very nice example of the Spaniard..Lovely detail and well centred..

Here's one of my best buys 2022..cJQ74yFJaD552f3HL8Tsfj6G9QnnZa.jpg.a16c7ab4f46fe94224fb2f4124e404e4.jpg

Septimius Severus. 193-211 AD. AR Denarius (3.26 gm, 18mm). Rome mint. Struck 193 AD.
Obv.: IMP CAEL SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right.
Rev.: LEG XIIII GEM M V / TR P COS, legionary eagle between two standards. RIC 14; RSC 272; BMCRE 19. VF

 

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1 hour ago, Coinmaster said:

PS: I got a (maybe stupid) question about the text on the front side. The letters are: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, what's translated as: Imperator Traiano Augustus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate, Consul Quintum, Pater Patriae. But I thought the name of the emperor is Traian (Trajan) or Trajanus, not Traiano (which seems to me Italian instead of Latin). Shouldn't it translate into: Imperator Traianus Optimus, Augustus, Germanicus, (etc.)?

It’s because it’s dative (‘to Trajan’), in the sense of dedicated to him. As to why his coins are dative and not most others, I don’t know!

Edited by John Conduitt
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Not my prettiest coin, but this one was the most fun to attribute in 2022 - it took a long time, but the solution really thrilled me - the one and only issue of Vespasian II (or Vespasian the Younger), an adopted heir of Domitian who did not live very long.  Only Smyrna issued a portrait coin for him.  This one came in an unattributed eBay lot with some other gems:

1262877207_SmyrnaIonia-VespasianJr.NikelotJun2022(0).jpg.5518489f9f735f1f2d480040bee16992.jpg

Vespasian the Younger     Æ 16 Smyrna, Ionia (c. 94-95 A.D.) ΟΥƐ[ϹΠΑϹΙ]ΑΝ[ΟϹ] ΝΕΩΤΕΡΟϹ, bare-headed bust right / [ΖΜ]ΥΡΝ[Α]ΙΩΝ, Nike walking right holding wreath and palm branch over shoulder RPC II 1028; BMC 319; Klose, XLII, 1; plate 31, V1/R1. (3.02 grams / 16 mm) eBay June 2022        Lot @ $0.99

Attribution Notes: The portrait on this Smyrnian bronze.. (with) the inscription OYEC P ACIANOC NE  W TEPOC (‘the younger Vespasian’), has been a subject of much debate... An accidental mulling of a Vespasian Junior portrait die and a reverse die (of) Nemesis intended for an issue of Domitian’s wife Domitia makes it clear that the subject must be Vespasian Jr. Beyond this single issue, no other coins are known to name or portray Vespasian Junior..." NAC AG   Die Matches:  Per RIC, there are two obverse dies, which looks to be the case from many online examples. For obv./rev. die match, see: Numismatica Ars Classica AG Auction 62; Lot 2031; 06.10.2011.  For obverse die match (only), see RPC 1028, specimen No. 24

Here's a die-match, much nicer than mine, so you can see the details:

1356601398_SmyrnaIonia-VespasianJr.NikelotJun2022(1compauct).jpg.5b4648ab1e19437db12410e05c351cb1.jpg

As for your TRAIANO question, @Coinmaster I think that's in the (Latin) dative, which shows up on coins from time to time (Volusian especially).  @Roman Collector and others on the Forum are good at Latin grammar and can answer that question in full.  

Edited by Marsyas Mike
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4 hours ago, Coinmaster said:

PS: I got a (maybe stupid) question about the text on the front side. The letters are: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, what's translated as: Imperator Traiano Augustus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate, Consul Quintum, Pater Patriae. But I thought the name of the emperor is Traian (Trajan) or Trajanus, not Traiano (which seems to me Italian instead of Latin). Shouldn't it translate into: Imperator Traianus Optimus, Augustus, Germanicus, (etc.)?

The dative case is typically used when a ruler strikes a coin FOR another person, typically a family member. We see this, for example, on the coins issued by Antoninus Pius for his daughter, Faustina the Younger: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL (for Faustina Augusta, daughter of Pius Augustus).

However, as you note, TRAIANO is in the dative case here, too (the dative of advantage, specifically), so that everyone would know that the coin they held in their hand was issued FOR him. But who issued it for him? The inscription on the reverse contains the subject of the title: SPQR.

Yes, SPQR is an abbreviation and doesn't have any inflectional endings to prove it's the subject, but @Marsyas Mike has a coin in his collection that provides us important information.

Trajan - Dupond Felicitas lot May 2020 (0).jpg
Dupondius of Trajan in @Marsyas Mike's collection with SPQR written out in full as Senatus Populusque Romanus on the reverse.

When the obverse and reverse legends on Mike's coin are combined (as intended), the title reads IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC PM [TRP COS] VI PP SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS. Note that Senatus Populusque Romanus is in the nominative case and is the subject of the title and Traiano is the dative object of the (implied by the dative of advantage) preposition, "for."

Similarly, @Coinmaster, the title on your coin extends to the reverse, which includes SPQR: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI. Note that Optimo Principi is also in the dative, modifying Traiano. All of the other abbreviations would be in the dative if written out in full, too. The full inscription on your coin is therefore translated as "The senate and people of Rome for the emperor Trajan, the revered one, victor over the Germans and Dacians, highest priest, holder of tribunician power, consul for the 5th time, father of his country, the best ruler."

Yes, that title is so obsequious as to be cringe-worthy. But it's Trajan we're talking about! But consider this -- was Muhammad Ali bragging when he said, "I am the greatest" or was he telling the truth?

39 minutes ago, Marsyas Mike said:

As for your TRAIANO question, @Coinmaster I think that's in the (Latin) dative, which shows up on coins from time to time (Volusian especially).  @Roman Collector and others on the Forum are good at Latin grammar and can answer that question in full.  

Thanks for the kind words, @Marsyas Mike. I hope you don't mind I illustrated my answer with a coin from your collection.

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37 minutes ago, Roman Collector said:

Yes, that title is so obsequious as to be cringe-worthy. But it's Trajan we're talking about!

If there is anyone that earned that many titles it is probably Trajan, the only reason that the 5 Good Emperors are remembered as such is because Nerva pulled off the absolute master stroke of adopting the most competent man on the planet 😆

As for my best buy, it is almost definitely this Julian coin that I got from Tom Vossen for 90 euros.

4214_20400.jpg

This was the best looking Julian coin on the internet for a price that was affordable to me, I know because I looked. The lettering on the obverse, the crack, and the worn bull on the reverse are trade offs, but just look at that portrait he looks so amazing, so damn charming. It is also huge and heavy, so it feels amazing in hand. 10/10, would buy again.

20221217_231743.jpg20221217_231912.jpg

Next year, I am getting a silver Julian 😄

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Nice ones folks !

Best buy (in terms of best opportunity), or preferred coin ?
If we are talking opportunity here, then my best buy in 2022, is probably this one :

cc3acad860d54fdfa920cad627e18d59.jpg

Even though it was 5th position only in my top of the year list, here

Why is that ?

The # 1 on my list wasn't ancient (it's possibly one of my best purchases ever, but medieval/renaissance)
The # 2, 3 and 4 were bought from Leu, for prices I don't consider bargains. They're enviable coins, but not rare enough to drive people crazy about them
That # 5 however, sold for half the price it brought at CNG ten years ago, which alone doesn't count much, but also finding a well struck and well preserved tetradrachm of Julia Domna isn't something you see eveyday

Q

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the title reads : Imperatori Traiano Augusto Germanico Dacico Pontifici Maximo Tribuniciae Potestati Consuli V Patri Patriae. As @Roman Collector said, it is a dative of advantage for most words, except tribuniciae potestati  is a dativus possesivus, meaning he has the potestas, patriae here is a genitive : of the country

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10 minutes ago, ValiantKnight said:

I’d say my denier of Charlemagne:

 

Charlemagne, Frankish Kingdom/Carolingian Empire
AR denier
Obv: CARLVS REX FR, cross above, cross within dotted circle in center
Rev: METVLLO, cross above, KRLS (Karolus) monogram within dotted circle in center
Mint: Melle
Date: 793/794-814 AD
Ref: Nou-94 

charlemagnevk3.jpg.20bfb7c6a1e331609faee824a510b3d4.jpg.05fa6dfd6e1ad9bbf49f9177c99a3b04.jpg

Great coin.

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I would have to say it would be this guy. 

Trajan Ae sestertius 116 AD Obv Bust right draped and laureate. Rv. Trajan seated on a platform left placing diadem upon head of Parthamaspates kneeling before him. To Trojans right and left stand two attendants RIC 667 Woytek 594 v-25 This coin illustrated. 28.78 grms 33 mm Photo by W Hansentrajans37.jpg.1dac8b432b9b30368db9504595c16606.jpgI was wandering among the tables at the NYINC when my friend @Romancollector told me about this table that to be honest I had over looked. On their table was this coin. This sestertius had many things going for it. It was a sestertius it was a sestertius of Trajan with an interesting reverse. It was an ex Niggler (1967) Ex Platt Hall (1950) and plated in a book (Woytek) I was really surprised to find something like this that checked so many boxes. (Really I shouldn't have been. It is the NYINC after all)  So I bought it. Subsequently I discovered that the coin was auctioned off once before in 1919 Glendinings 

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I'd have to say my Okhos tet. I was aware of these coins, but hadn't even placed it on my list because I felt I'd never be able to afford one.

331A1965-Edit.jpg.3e39ee0a9d570a72c3672bb3e71a348c.jpg

EGYPT, Achaemenid Province. Artaxerxes III Okhos. As Pharaoh of Egypt
343/2-338/7 BCE
AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 15.07 g, 9h)
Imitating Athens. Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing earring and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl
Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent to left, “Artaxerxes Pharaoh” in two-line Demotic A script to right.
two test cuts on either side, obv. punch.
Van Alfen Type I, 1–5 = Price, More 147–9; O. Mørkholm, “A Coin of Artaxerxes III” in NC 1974, pl. I, 7–8; cf. Meadows, Administration 329; Mildenberg, Münzwesen 124.
Ex CNG

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Very difficult to choose a favorite for my  2022 coins because, from a numismatic point of view, it was a rich year for me. I managed to acquire almost all the targets I had in mind 1 year ago. As some colleagues have noticed, condition is NOT a major factor for me, I prefer rarity/interesting designs/coins with historical motifs. 

Most of them were posted in dedicated topics and/or in my Top 10 topics. I managed to add a Mazaios stater with a great reverse, a Geta as Augustus with a Janus reverse, some great RR denarii including a Brutus and many others. 

But I would pick this one for many personal reasons. I chased the type for a few months and I failed all the previous ones (quite a lot of them in auctions in 2022!). Also - I am not a fan of slabbed coins but I wanted one. Of course, main reason was that I liked the design a lot and this coin was a pleasant surprise in hand as it has lots of details present. 

image.png.a5e579a254dd18def8fbea0d16f88041.png

C. Mamilius Limetanus, 82 BC. Serrate Denarius, Rome. Draped bust of Mercury to right, wearing winged petasus and with caduceus over his left shoulder; behind, S. Rev. C·MAMIL LIMET͡AN, Ulysses advancing right, holding walking stick in his left hand and extending his right towards his dog Argus, on the right, standing left. Babelon (Mamilia) 6. Crawford 362/1. RBW 1370 var. (differing control-letter on the obverse). Sydenham 741.

The Mamilia gens derived its origin from Mamilia, the daughter of Telegonus, the reputed son of Ulysses and Circe, and thus C. Mamilius, as monetal triumvir, caused this subject to be adopted on his coins. The reverse shows Ulysses, after an absence of many years, returning in a mean and humble dress to the island of Ithaca, where he was at once recognized by his old dog Argus, who died of joy at seeing his former master.

Edited by ambr0zie
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1 hour ago, kapphnwn said:

I would have to say it would be this guy. 

Trajan Ae sestertius 116 AD Obv Bust right draped and laureate. Rv. Trajan seated on a platform left placing diadem upon head of Parthamaspates kneeling before him. To Trojans right and left stand two attendants RIC 667 Woytek 594 v-25 This coin illustrated. 28.78 grms 33 mm Photo by W Hansentrajans37.jpg.1dac8b432b9b30368db9504595c16606.jpgI was wandering among the tables at the NYINC when my friend @Romancollector told me about this table that to be honest I had over looked. On their table was this coin. This sestertius had many things going for it. It was a sestertius it was a sestertius of Trajan with an interesting reverse. It was an ex Niggler (1967) Ex Platt Hall (1950) and plated in a book (Woytek) I was really surprised to find something like this that checked so many boxes. (Really I shouldn't have been. It is the NYINC after all)  So I bought it. Subsequently I discovered that the coin was auctioned off once before in 1919 Glendinings 

Oh wow, this coin is insane and must has cost you a kidney or your marriage!!

Incredible museum piece, congratulations!

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1 hour ago, kirispupis said:

I'd have to say my Okhos tet. I was aware of these coins, but hadn't even placed it on my list because I felt I'd never be able to afford one.

331A1965-Edit.jpg.3e39ee0a9d570a72c3672bb3e71a348c.jpg

EGYPT, Achaemenid Province. Artaxerxes III Okhos. As Pharaoh of Egypt
343/2-338/7 BCE
AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 15.07 g, 9h)
Imitating Athens. Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing earring and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl
Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent to left, “Artaxerxes Pharaoh” in two-line Demotic A script to right.
two test cuts on either side, obv. punch.
Van Alfen Type I, 1–5 = Price, More 147–9; O. Mørkholm, “A Coin of Artaxerxes III” in NC 1974, pl. I, 7–8; cf. Meadows, Administration 329; Mildenberg, Münzwesen 124.
Ex CNG

Very nice indeed! I wonder why there was need for 'test cuts' on both sides.  In my opinion this coin could also be used as an offering and therefor be mutulated, to transform it for this other purpose. This is also a practice in early medieval times. Of course test cuts is another possibility, but I would argue not the only one. Anyway, great coin!

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1 hour ago, Coinmaster said:

Very nice indeed! I wonder why there was need for 'test cuts' on both sides.  In my opinion this coin could also be used as an offering and therefor be mutulated, to transform it for this other purpose. This is also a practice in early medieval times. Of course test cuts is another possibility, but I would argue not the only one. Anyway, great coin!

Test cuts are extremely common for tets during this period, but you're right that having a test cut on both sides is rare. This is the only Okhos tet on acsearch with test cuts on both sides (though there haven't been that many). I did find several Sabakes tets with test cuts on the reverse + obverse. Mine only has a test cut on one side, though it has banker's marks on both.

331A8650-Edit.jpg.883eebee244930563f34b5b299da0630.jpg

Egypt, Achaemenid Province. Sabakes, satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Circa 340-333 BCE
16.61g, 25mm, 9h.
Head of Athena to right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing to right with head facing, olive sprig with berry and crescent in upper left field; uncertain letters to left, ""Sabakes symbol"" and SWYK (in Aramaic) to right.
Van Alfen Type III, 24-34 var. (O11/R- [unlisted rev. die]); Nicolet-Pierre, Monnaies 18-26 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 4 var. (no letters on left of rev.); BMC 265 var. (same).
Ex Roma

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Only coin I got this year and very pleased with it.

 

h_0bace8f4d137ce8a45d5693852b85461-PhotoRoom.jpg.609a44d8cc5ad2424c89a8c8f75d336d.jpg

Septimius Severus (193 - 211 A.D.)
AR Tetradrachm
SELEUCIS and PIERIA
Laodicea ad Mare
O: AVT KAI CЄOVHPOC CЄ, laureate and draped bust right, seen from side.
R: ΔHMAPX ЄΞ VΠATOC TO Γ, eagle standing facing, head left, with wings spread, holding wreath in beak; star between legs.  208-9 A.D.
11.61g
28mm
McAlee, Severan Group 3, 25; Prieur 1149; Bellinger 52

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difficult to make a choise.

image.png.2dff19ad47205fc9896fa68b9737f320.pngimage.png.27b7d92bcfccc242c12fcdd84967a307.png

obverse : bust of Vulcan r., draped ans wearing a cap bound with tongs over schoulder, behind  X around wreath, control-mark before, border of dots

reverse : eagle on thunderbolt r, below L.CPT, around laurel-wreath, border of dots

Cr 314,1b, minted Rome 105 BC, 18 mm, 3,98 gr, 6 h., moneyer presumably Lucius Aurelius Cotta.

obverse dies :36, reverse dies 45 for two variants

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Here's mine, and it's actually one I got really recently! 


image.png.c408a402f8d90737c2b09feb5c1c4f86.png
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, round earring with central boss, and pearl necklace / Owl standing to right with head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind, ΑΘΕ before; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591-8; SNG Copenhagen 31; HGC 4, 1597. 17.14g, 25mm, 4h.

Near Extremely Fine.

I went for one with the nicest reverse I could afford. Of course, with my budget, I had to sacrifice some obverse quality to achieve this, but I'm ok with that. 


I'm super happy with it, and I've wanted one for a really long time. 😄

 

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On 12/25/2022 at 8:20 PM, ValiantKnight said:

I’d say my denier of Charlemagne:

 

Charlemagne, Frankish Kingdom/Carolingian Empire
AR denier
Obv: CARLVS REX FR, cross above, cross within dotted circle in center
Rev: METVLLO, cross above, KRLS (Karolus) monogram within dotted circle in center
Mint: Melle
Date: 793/794-814 AD
Ref: Nou-94 

charlemagnevk3.jpg.20bfb7c6a1e331609faee824a510b3d4.jpg.05fa6dfd6e1ad9bbf49f9177c99a3b04.jpg

Nice coin. I'm always confused about these. Sometimes they are attributed to Karl* the Great (Charlemagne) and sometimes to Karl the Bald. I don't have a picture handy, but I have one of this type, which I bought attributed to Karl the Bald, but it is identical to your coin (only the letters are somewhat narrower). Is there anything that allows one to attribute these pennies to either Karl the Great or Karl the Bald?

I shall post a picture next week, when I have access to the coin again.

 

* I prefer to call him Karl and not Charles or Charlemagne, as Karl was and eastern Frank who spoke Frankish (Germanic) and not Romanic/Latin let alone French. The same goes for Merovingian kings like Clovis = Chlodewig, Thierry = Theuderic etc.

 

 

 

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For me, it's a toss up between two, on opposite ends of my collecting spectrum.

For Roman:

Judaea, Caesaria Panias

AE18 of Herod Agrippa I, for Caesonia, with Julia Drusilla, wife and daughter of Caligula

Dated Year 5 = 40-41 AD

Obv: KAIΣΩNIA ΓYNH ΣEBAΣTOY, Draped bust of Caesonia left

Rev: ΔΡOYΣIΛΛA ΘYΓATΡI ΣEBAΣTOY LE, small figure of Julia Drusilla, robed, holding Nike and branch927529389_CaesoniawithJuliaDrusillaAEJudaea.jpg.84adbd60e128284d2ce5aa732aedab95.jpg

This is the only unanimously accepted portrait of Caesonia, wife of Caligula, and certainly the only surviving image of their daughter Drusilla in any medium. Coupled with the extreme rarity of the type, this will certainly remain a crown jewel of my "every member of the Imperial families" collection.

 

And on the opposite side -

India, Pratiharas

Indo-Sassanian "Sri Vi" series, ca 700-800?

Unpublished three letter legend, Sri ViPra?

467826649_ZomboDroid29072022160333.jpg.a1fa8eedec5ac338b82ea9f63e007af5.jpg

This is, as far as I am aware, the only extant example of this new series, which is a big deal considering the (comparatively) static nature of most Indo-Sassanian designs.

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  • 2 weeks later...

9DE1055F-FD35-47E1-AE31-F20739355156.jpeg.44266515e6397336d1ca59e9209256a2.jpeg0FCB8C20-1C41-4CE1-B62E-49A5BEFD82E5.jpeg.a6d5e84d1e711676919d4ed76e9c8ddd.jpegPostumus Antoninianus, struck under Aureolus 267/268 AD at Milan mint. 
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. 
Rev: VIRTVS EQVITVM / S (in exergue), Hercules standing right, right hand resting on hip, left hand holding lion's skin and club which rests on rock. 
RIC 389; Elmer 619; AGK 113; Cunetio 2497

It has no silvering but an amazing portrait for these types and a rare reverse.

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