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Domitian's Victory


David Atherton
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This is a coin you don't come across everyday, granted it's not in prime condition, but still it's fairly rare and stylish.

 

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Domitian

Æ As, 9.63g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS X; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in field; Victory adv. r., holding aquila with both hands
RIC 230 (R). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB.fr, May 2022.

The Victory holding aquila reverse was fleetingly struck for Domitian in 84 and 85 amidst the flurry of Germania Capta types, which it is undoubtedly a part of. Of note, the COS X issues are the first appearance of the Domitian's new title of Germanicus (GERM), awarded for his recent triumph over the Chatti. This rare variant of the type with an abbreviated obverse legend is missing from both the BM and Paris collections, RIC cites only one specimen in Glasgow.

Please post your Victory coins!

As always, thanks for looking!

 

Edited by David Atherton
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It's always good to acquire a rarity for one's collection, @David Atherton! Well done!

My favorite Victory is this antoninianus of T-Bone where the goddess is experiencing a "wardrobe malfunction."

[IMG]
Trebonianus Gallus, AD 251-253.
Roman AR antoninianus, 3.49 g, 20.3 mm, 7 h.
Antioch, unmarked officina, AD 252-253.
Obv: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust (viewed from back) of Trebonianus Gallus, right.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing right, on globe, holding a wreath and a palm.
Refs: RIC 94; Cohen --; RSC 127b; RCV 9654; Hunter p. cvi.
Notes: Scarce. Only six examples are to be found among the 949 coins representing 11 hoards summarized by Metcalf (p. 87).
 
 
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Domitian Ar denarius 85 AD. Obv Head right laureate Rv German woman in attitude of mourning seated right on shield RIC 331 3.28 grms 18 mm Phot by W. Hansendomitd25.thumb.jpg.4c6877e6d514234127e2a51c60c419ae.jpg

I believe this coin was struck to commemorate his success against the Chatti. 

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Nice addition @David Atherton..

Love the more unusual depiction of victory....Interesting coin...

normal_treb_tog.jpg.d701077b43c578f5220dd88c77724a7e.jpg

Trebonianus Gallus, AR Antoninianus, Antioch, 251-253 AD, 21.6mm; 3.55 gr.
Obverse- IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse- VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm.
RIC IV-3, 93;

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image.png.8b89a3e258d54b36e23e68b6cd0f51e4.pngTrajan Decius, 249-251 Sestertius circa 249-251, Æ 27mm., 18.79g. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r. Rev. Victory advancing l., holding wreath and palm branch. C 117. RIC 126a.

 

Not the greatest of images!

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Marcian, Eastern Roman Empire
AV solidus
Obv: D N MARCIA-NVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed three-quarter facing bust, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman
Rev: VICTORI-A AVGGG, Victory standing left, holding long jeweled cross, star in right field
Mint: Constantinople
Mintmark: CONOB
Date: 450-457 AD
Ref: RIC 510
Size: 4.46 gr., 21 mm

[IMG]

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image.thumb.jpeg.d2f5fccb98e484f92159aac36ad0c6b2.jpeg

Vespasian, 69-79 AD.
AR Denarius, 3.18 g, 18.7 mm, 6 h.
Rome mint, 72 AD.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory, draped, advancing right, holding palm over left shoulder in left hand and with right about to place wreath on a standard set on ground.
Refs: RIC 362, RCV 2317.
Acquired from Roma Numismatics E-Sale 59, Lot 781, 11 July 2019.

 

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This is not Victory, but Minerva disguised as Victory.

image.png.0a270f4da23e19adb487433014435a4e.png

 

Domitian AD 81-96. Rome. Denarius AR/ 18 mm, 2,62 g
RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Domitian 791. Old RIC 194 (s) C. 294; BMC 237; CBN 210.
Date Range: AD 95 - AD 96
IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, head of Domitian, laureate, right / IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P/  Minerva Victrix, winged, flying l., holding javelin and round shield.

 

Note: The iconography of this coin is most intriguing. This is the only depiction of a winged Minerva in all of Roman coinage, and indeed the concept itself has few parallels in surviving classical art. The closest comparable figure may be found in the winged statue of Minerva Victrix at Ostia, which originally formed part of the decoration of the upper gate known as the Porta Romana. This winged form of Minerva may well have been taken from earlier Greek images of Athena, such as that shown on a black-figure vase found at Orvieto and illustrated in Röm. Mitt. XII, pl. xii, which shows two representations of Athena – one winged and one without wings. With the exception of Nike-Victoria, most of the Greco-Roman gods had shed their wings by the early classical period; that such an archaism should be revived in the time of Domitian is therefore quite inexplicable, save perhaps for the possibility that it was simply an act of whimsy by an emperor who was known to favour Minerva above all other gods.

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14 hours ago, Spaniard said:

Nice addition @David Atherton..

Love the more unusual depiction of victory....Interesting coin...

normal_treb_tog.jpg.d701077b43c578f5220dd88c77724a7e.jpg

Trebonianus Gallus, AR Antoninianus, Antioch, 251-253 AD, 21.6mm; 3.55 gr.
Obverse- IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse- VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm.
RIC IV-3, 93;

Really like Antioch Trebonianus for some reason. I have eyed his coins for a long time now. Perhaps it is time to get me one of those Victorias that look so good.

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image.png.4298af51d3c09120bf5bf23b6889afa6.png

Pupienus, 22nd April # 29th July 238. Sestertius April-June 238, Æ 29mm., 18.91g. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r. Rev. Victory standing facing, head l., holding wreath and palm branch. C 38. RIC 23a. Ex-Navilles Auction 55

And of more interest to @David Atherton

image.thumb.png.b9e8cc899e3799d81a60f45117101840.png

 

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Domitian, 81-96 Sestertius Rome circa 90-91, Æ 34.00 mm., 24.39 g.
Laureate head r. 
C 513. RIC 703.   Rev. Domitian standing l., holding thunderbolt in r. hand and spear in l., crowned by Victory standing l. In exergue, S # C. 

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7 hours ago, ambr0zie said:

This is not Victory, but Minerva disguised as Victory.

image.png.0a270f4da23e19adb487433014435a4e.png

 

Domitian AD 81-96. Rome. Denarius AR/ 18 mm, 2,62 g
RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Domitian 791. Old RIC 194 (s) C. 294; BMC 237; CBN 210.
Date Range: AD 95 - AD 96
IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, head of Domitian, laureate, right / IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P/  Minerva Victrix, winged, flying l., holding javelin and round shield.

 

Note: The iconography of this coin is most intriguing. This is the only depiction of a winged Minerva in all of Roman coinage, and indeed the concept itself has few parallels in surviving classical art. The closest comparable figure may be found in the winged statue of Minerva Victrix at Ostia, which originally formed part of the decoration of the upper gate known as the Porta Romana. This winged form of Minerva may well have been taken from earlier Greek images of Athena, such as that shown on a black-figure vase found at Orvieto and illustrated in Röm. Mitt. XII, pl. xii, which shows two representations of Athena – one winged and one without wings. With the exception of Nike-Victoria, most of the Greco-Roman gods had shed their wings by the early classical period; that such an archaism should be revived in the time of Domitian is therefore quite inexplicable, save perhaps for the possibility that it was simply an act of whimsy by an emperor who was known to favour Minerva above all other gods.

 

Thank you for posting that wonderful coin!

I too have the TR P XV variant, but this super rare TR P XVI has to be my favourite.

 

 

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Domitian

AR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

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Here is another Domitian to share.

image.thumb.png.c85de5fcb6c889844a3adbaf77d09190.png

 

Domitian, 81-96 Denarius 92-93, AR 18.5mm., 3.40g. Laureate head r. Rev. Minerva standing r. on capital of rostral column, brandishing spear and holding round shield; at feet to right, owl standing facing. RIC 740. C 281.

This coin has confused me in the past as most references refer to Minerva standing on a rostral column and others standing on the prow of a ship. I've assumed the description in RIC II is correct describing it as  a rostral column so can someone tell me if the prow description is simply a matter of opinion?

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Not a Domitian, but couldn't help but share my Trajan Victory from 101/102 AD

Ordered from Tom Vossen on Vcoins and currently in transit... so these are the seller's photos and I haven't actually seen the coin yet! But I'm VERY excited, I think it's beautiful and the condition of the obverse is really outstanding for the price i paid

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Edited by jfp7375
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Congrats on acquiring an example of this issue for your collection, @David Atherton! I can contribute a couple of Victories too: the first one is another Antiochene coin of Gallus, similar to the ones that have been posted before, thought this is a very rare variant with the officina mark between Victory's legs rather than in the exergue; this is the only reverse die of Antioch to feature this characteristic out of all the ones of the period.

1360148017_IMPCCVIBTREBGALLVSPFAVG-VICTORIAAVG.jpg.83d2bbefbbd31e8caccce79d863221ce.jpg

Roman Empire, Trebonianus Gallus (251-253), Antoninianus, Antioch mint.

Obverse: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, IIV below;

Reverse: VICT-ORI-A AVG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm, IIV between Victory's legs;

RIC IV 93;

 

The other one is an antoninianus of Tacitus from Siscia; his issues showing Victory walking are very rare and were only used at this mint by the first officina and during the first, second and fifth emissions.

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Roman Empire, Tacitus (275-276), Aurelianus, Siscia mint.

Obverse: IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; 

Reverse: VICT-ORIA AVG, Victory running right, holding wreath in right hand and palm against left shoulder, P in exergue; 

RIC V - (c.f. RIC V 169); RIC V Online 3780;

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