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Tetradrachme Antiochus VII


LuckyLuudje
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Hello all, This is my first post on a coin Forum, so please be gentle is I am mistaking.

My first coin was a Dutch gold 10 guilder coin from 1875 that I bought around 1985 and still have it.

I do collect collect coins  my whole life, but bullion coins like sovereigns. Not really ancient.

I did however buy some old coins I just bought because they are really beautifull and  saved  a few from melting.

 

Lately I am getting more interested in finding the history of the old coins. So I want to document them for what they are.

So here is my first. If I am correct, this would be a real Tertradrachme  from Antiochus VII (138-129 BC). IMG_0806.JPG.e131674fb04f4a87420ee7f8e2e00f4c.JPGIMG_0804.JPG.bc627eb17e86a33141304a18445f5253.JPGIMG_0809.JPG.77db277831e4b285dd5b3589e7de1ef3.JPG

IMG_0793.JPG.57142f2f21a5f3f381c29da044509007.JPG

(weight 16,5 gram size 26,85mm and 28,36mm thick 3,78mm).

All comments and opinions are appreciated.

 

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18 minutes ago, LuckyLuudje said:

Hello all, This is my first post on a coin Forum, so please be gentle is I am mistaking.

My first coin was a Dutch gold 10 guilder coin from 1875 that I bought around 1985 and still have it.

I do collect collect coins  my whole life, but bullion coins like sovereigns. Not really ancient.

I did however buy some old coins I just bought because they are really beautifull and  saved  a few from melting.

 

Lately I am getting more interested in finding the history of the old coins. So I want to document them for what they are.

So here is my first. If I am correct, this would be a real Tertradrachme  from Antiochus VII (138-129 BC). IMG_0806.JPG.e131674fb04f4a87420ee7f8e2e00f4c.JPGIMG_0804.JPG.bc627eb17e86a33141304a18445f5253.JPGIMG_0809.JPG.77db277831e4b285dd5b3589e7de1ef3.JPG

IMG_0793.JPG.57142f2f21a5f3f381c29da044509007.JPG

(weight 16,5 gram size 26,85mm and 28,36mm thick 3,78mm).

All comments and opinions are appreciated.

 

 

18 minutes ago, LuckyLuudje said:

Hello all, This is my first post on a coin Forum, so please be gentle is I am mistaking.

My first coin was a Dutch gold 10 guilder coin from 1875 that I bought around 1985 and still have it.

I do collect collect coins  my whole life, but bullion coins like sovereigns. Not really ancient.

I did however buy some old coins I just bought because they are really beautifull and  saved  a few from melting.

 

Lately I am getting more interested in finding the history of the old coins. So I want to document them for what they are.

So here is my first. If I am correct, this would be a real Tertradrachme  from Antiochus VII (138-129 BC). IMG_0806.JPG.e131674fb04f4a87420ee7f8e2e00f4c.JPGIMG_0804.JPG.bc627eb17e86a33141304a18445f5253.JPGIMG_0809.JPG.77db277831e4b285dd5b3589e7de1ef3.JPG

IMG_0793.JPG.57142f2f21a5f3f381c29da044509007.JPG

(weight 16,5 gram size 26,85mm and 28,36mm thick 3,78mm).

All comments and opinions are appreciated.

 

LuckyL., Welcome to the website ☺️. Your coin looks like one I sold at auction 🧐.207426373_NGC2491168-002ExAWKCollection.jpg.61dd10acb2176638bb85077bb18e7f7a.jpg

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 Ha ha, thats funny,

But wait till you will see my post of my coins in the future,

My coins are really divers, from ancient greek, to Zecchinos, from  Ducats to  Dinars.

That makes it for me so hard to determine them.

 

I am now working on my Byzantine coins. found a few already

Histamenon, Hyperpyron, Asper, Solidus, tremissis..... it makes me crazy but I get there😀

 

 

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Posthumous  coin of Antiochos Vll means a type of coin of the Seleucid king  minted and copied in the Cappadocian  kingdom  to pay mercenary troops familiar with the type of coin.  This was discovered not so long ago when controls on coins were noticed on Cappadocian drachms and such!  The reading is found under Lorber on academia.edu. 

NSK=John 

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Posters will learn generally more from looking at Numismatical papers tham from highly abbreviated posts! The papers often give the sense of what the authors were looking at and the deductions they made. The criticisms and digging they had to do to get to where they were and are. As above Krenkal and the rest had to know something about Cappadocian coins  and the life and times of various  the Ariathres  kings and what mercenaries were available. Several great papers are available to ones who want to search on academia.edu.

 

See my sold Antiochos Vll below that I found to be a Cappadocian copy, which made it more interesting!

 Antiochus Vll Sidetes Tetradrachm 138-129 BC 

 Obs - Diademed head of Antiochus Vll in fillet border
16.32g 29mm SC 2061.4e
( Cappadocian mint?)
Rev- Athena holding Nike presenting wreath left , right, hand on shield proping up spear
Ins- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΙΓΕΡΟΥ surrounded by wreath
Control marks Monogram composing ΔΙ below A before Athena left Right above shield, A above M
An early Cappadocian copy emission 4 obs A14 (Krenkal & Lorber 2009) 

 

NSK=John

Antiochops Cappadocia.jpg

Edited by NewStyleKing
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Beautiful tetradrachms of the Seleucid Empire you all have there! Beautiful. As I had already written - these coins have their special beauty and charm. The post also rang my doorbell today and brought me this specimen.

Antiochos VII Euergetes (Sidetes)
Tetradrachm of the Seleucid Empire Period 138/129 BC
Material: Silver
Diameter: 29mm
Weight: 16.36g
Mint: Antiochia ad Orontem, Seleucid Empire
Reference: SC 2061.4e, HGC 9 1067d

Obverse: You can see the diademed head of Antiochos VII to right.

Reverse: Athena Nikephorus standing to the left holding a spear and shield. Two monograms and A on the fields. The inscription reads: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ for Basileos Antiochou Eurgetou (Basileús Antíochos ho Eurgetou / King Antiochos the Benefactor).

Antiochos VII Euergetes, also called Antiochos Sidetes, reigned as king of the Seleucid Empire from 138 to 129 BC and is considered the last important ruler of this Hellenistic state. After the capture of his brother, the Seleucid king Demetrios II, by the Parthians, Antiochos, who had until then grown up abroad, laid claim to rule in his paternal kingdom. With the support of Demetrios' wife Cleopatra Thea, he was able to prevail in a military conflict against Diodotos Tryphon, his brother's previous rival for the throne. He thus ended the long-lasting civil wars in the Seleucid Empire, which only broke out again after his death. To legitimise his rule, he married his sister-in-law Cleopatra Thea.

In his nine-year reign, Antiochos strove with some success to reverse the massive territorial and authority losses of the previous decades. Of the numerous wars he waged to this end, only the one against the Maccabean independence movement in Palestine is known in more detail. This conflict resulted in a siege of Jerusalem lasting several months, which was ended with a compromise. In the peace treaty concluded, the Jews were able to maintain their internal autonomy, but were firmly reintegrated into the Seleucid Empire.

In 131 BC, Antiochos finally began a large-scale campaign against the Parthian Arsacids, the most aggressive enemies of the Seleucid Empire at the time, who had conquered economically very important Mesopotamia a few years earlier. The military advance was initially extremely successful: in the first year of the war, his army brought Mesopotamia back under its control, and in the second it advanced as far as the Parthian heartland southeast of the Caspian Sea. Antiochos rejected a peace offer from the Arsacids. This proved to be a mistake. While his soldiers were decentralised into winter camps, the Parthian king Phraates II organised a joint uprising of many cities in the region and then led his counter-attack, in which the militarily now much weaker Antiochos was defeated and lost his life. His brother Demetrios, whom Phraates had released shortly before, probably for tactical reasons, then entered his second reign in the Seleucid Empire. In the following years, however, the empire shrank again to a comparatively small area in Syria, Cilicia and Coilesyria.

Nikephoros (Greek: "victory bringer", from nike "victory" and phoreo "bring, carry", Latin form: Nikephorus or Nicephorus) is an epithet of the Greek goddess Athena.

image.png.f8178bc0b646bb8f8712a3dc2fe26420.png

 

 

Edited by Prieure de Sion
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Yes, but what about Ariathes (?) in cappadocia at the time? What was actually going on? Who were the mercenaries for, where were they coming from? Where are the hoards mainly containing imitations found?  That's questions!  Anyone interested in answers?  When I bought my coin 12  years ago lots and lots of coins like this appeared  for sale  and prompted research .

NSK=John

 

Research is everything otherwise its a disembodied lump of silver no matter how sculpted and designed! It's a bit like art with no art criticism.  Empty.

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