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Let's see some birds (... isn't that cute)


ambr0zie
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... but I think it's not wrong! As birds are a favorite reverse motif for me and I am sure I am not the only one with this idea. Probably the ancient people were fascinated by the idea of a flying bird - the essence of freedom and the ability to easily go where no man has gone before. So cute but not wrong!

Yesterday I got a snack coin from an auction - fun fact, about the only coin I had on my watch list I managed to get. A worn example and probably many people would have been tempted to scroll down ignoring it, but I noticed it has a bird on it I don't have in my collection (and I have rarely seen it)

image.png.2ee73bf300d28bdc7676c3e32517fd22.png

IONIA. Klazomenai. Circa 380-360 BC. Ӕ 10 mm 1.4 g
Obv : Laureate head of Apollo left. / Rev : [HΡAKΛEIΔHΣ] (?), swan standing left, below, grain ear left.
wings open. BMC 46; Lindgren & Kovacs 436.

As I am fan of "non standard reverses" - for me a non standard reverse means a reverse without somebody standing/seated, obviously reverses with birds are a big plus. My favorite remains this ostrich of Gordian

image.png.cda73f6db53d5b7bc3dcc9dcc33c8a71.png

Thrace. Hadrianopolis. Gordian III AD 238-244.
Bronze Æ
16 mm, 2,32 g
AYT K M ANT ΓOΡΔIANOC AV, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / AΔΡIANOΠOΛEITΩN, ostrich walking right
Varbanov 3833; RPC VII.2, — (unassigned; ID 67356); Jurukova, Hadrianopolis 676; Moushmov 2630A

As for the more "common" birds, the first one that comes in my mind is the eagle, for example on this Tomis pseudo-autonomous

image.png.b1190ff96687fd77fac3163f7a5a375c.png

Moesia, Tomis Æ21. Pseudo-autonomous issue, late 1st century AD. Laureate head of Zeus right / TOMEI-TѠN outwards around eagle facing right on thunderbolt, head reverted. RPC II, 411; AMNG I.2, 2509. 21 mm, 4,95 g.

Or a cousin of the eagle, the sea eagle

image.png.7254468efe2935375643ca64fcf34a86.png

Moesia. Istrus circa 280 - 256/255 BC
Obol or Trihemiobol AR 12 mm, 0,77 g
Facing male heads, the left one inverted / IΣTΡIH, Sea-eagle left on dolphin, ΔI beneath dolphin.
Dima, Tabelul III, Grupa IV, Subgrupa VII, II – Pl XXI, 10

 

A rarely occurred bird on coins is the raven, visible here but not as a major design element

image.png.bdecb57b44f75d622caf238bdaf0a891.png

ILLYRIA, Dyrrhachion. Circa 250-200 BC. AR Drachm Meniskos and Dionysios, magistrates. Cow standing right, looking back at suckling calf standing left below; above, raven standing right above MENIΣΚΟΣ / Double stellate pattern; ΔYP-ΔΙ[Ο-ΝΥ-ΣΟΥ] around; all within linear circle border. Ceka –; Maier 201; SNG Copenhagen 467.

 

Initially at @Ryro's suggestion I wanted to create a topic with animals on coins to see how many animals we can count here, but I think it's too vast and it would get either too crowded and difficult to follow or being an easy theme, nobody would post thinking others will.

So let's see your birds (don't be shy about your tetradrachms too!) and let's see how many we can add.

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Swans are unusual. Nice coin, especially with open wings. 

I have another one from Kyme.

normal_G_392_Kyme.jpg.2b5f704fa8893d56cc0327bbdea83d83.jpg

 

Asia Minor, Aeolis, Kyme
Pseudo-autonomous issue AD 117-161. (Hadrian or Antoninus Pius)
Obv: ΚYΜΑΙ, Head of Athena right
Rev.: ΕΠΙ ΙΕΡΩΝVΜΟV, swan standing, right
AE, 15 mm, 2,61g.
Ref.: RPC IV.2, 211 (temporary), BMC 101, MG 272, no. 224

 

There is also a stork standing on the gateway

normal_Gallienus_05.jpg.a62883952a76d0358d5dc7b22cd51cdf.jpg

Gallienus
Caria, Antiochia ad Maeandrum
AE 35
Obv.: ΑΥ Κ Π ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟΣ, Radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
Rev.: ΑΝΤΙΟΧΕΩΝ, Bridge spanning the Maeandrus river; gateway to bridge to left, surmounted by stork standing right; on parapet, river-god Maeandrus reclining left, holding reed and cornucopia.
AE, 22.11g, 35.4mm
Ref.: SNG von Aulock 2430

 

and a dove from Sikyon

 

normal_G_069_Sikonya_fac.jpg.60be7391aab7a25664669584fbd34b0c.jpg

Sikyonia, Sikyon
AR Stater, ca. 335-330 BC
Obv.: Chimaira standing left, raising forepaw; wreath above, ΣE below
Rev.: Dove flying left, N to left, all within wreath.
Ag, 11.9g, 23mm, die axis 9 o´clock
Ref.: BCD Peloponnesos 218 (same obv. die); HGC 5, 201.

 

and a medieval raven

normal_FR_003_fac.jpg.45a3bb814f302774f51d42c31ab5ff20.jpg

Freiburg im Breisgau
AR Brakteat
Rappen
AD ca. 1350
Obv.: Head of raven left, circle to left
Rev.: -
AR, 0.31g, 18mm
Ref.: Freiburger Münzen und Medaillen No. 5

Edited by shanxi
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I've shown this coin a few times, but it does have a rooster on it (though it's been suggested it's about to be sacrificed, so probably wishes it wasn't!)

Sicily, Selinos. Tetradrachm. c. 430 BC

Selinos_-removebg-preview.png.3c9bb83ab4ccef2758a564d33fc90813.png

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3 hours ago, ambr0zie said:

... but I think it's not wrong! As birds are a favorite reverse motif for me and I am sure I am not the only one with this idea. Probably the ancient people were fascinated by the idea of a flying bird - the essence of freedom and the ability to easily go where no man has gone before. So cute but not wrong!

Yesterday I got a snack coin from an auction - fun fact, about the only coin I had on my watch list I managed to get. A worn example and probably many people would have been tempted to scroll down ignoring it, but I noticed it has a bird on it I don't have in my collection (and I have rarely seen it)

image.png.2ee73bf300d28bdc7676c3e32517fd22.png

IONIA. Klazomenai. Circa 380-360 BC. Ӕ 10 mm 1.4 g
Obv : Laureate head of Apollo left. / Rev : [HΡAKΛEIΔHΣ] (?), swan standing left, below, grain ear left.
wings open. BMC 46; Lindgren & Kovacs 436.

As I am fan of "non standard reverses" - for me a non standard reverse means a reverse without somebody standing/seated, obviously reverses with birds are a big plus. My favorite remains this ostrich of Gordian

image.png.cda73f6db53d5b7bc3dcc9dcc33c8a71.png

Thrace. Hadrianopolis. Gordian III AD 238-244.
Bronze Æ
16 mm, 2,32 g
AYT K M ANT ΓOΡΔIANOC AV, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / AΔΡIANOΠOΛEITΩN, ostrich walking right
Varbanov 3833; RPC VII.2, — (unassigned; ID 67356); Jurukova, Hadrianopolis 676; Moushmov 2630A

As for the more "common" birds, the first one that comes in my mind is the eagle, for example on this Tomis pseudo-autonomous

image.png.b1190ff96687fd77fac3163f7a5a375c.png

Moesia, Tomis Æ21. Pseudo-autonomous issue, late 1st century AD. Laureate head of Zeus right / TOMEI-TѠN outwards around eagle facing right on thunderbolt, head reverted. RPC II, 411; AMNG I.2, 2509. 21 mm, 4,95 g.

Or a cousin of the eagle, the sea eagle

image.png.7254468efe2935375643ca64fcf34a86.png

Moesia. Istrus circa 280 - 256/255 BC
Obol or Trihemiobol AR 12 mm, 0,77 g
Facing male heads, the left one inverted / IΣTΡIH, Sea-eagle left on dolphin, ΔI beneath dolphin.
Dima, Tabelul III, Grupa IV, Subgrupa VII, II – Pl XXI, 10

 

A rarely occurred bird on coins is the raven, visible here but not as a major design element

image.png.bdecb57b44f75d622caf238bdaf0a891.png

ILLYRIA, Dyrrhachion. Circa 250-200 BC. AR Drachm Meniskos and Dionysios, magistrates. Cow standing right, looking back at suckling calf standing left below; above, raven standing right above MENIΣΚΟΣ / Double stellate pattern; ΔYP-ΔΙ[Ο-ΝΥ-ΣΟΥ] around; all within linear circle border. Ceka –; Maier 201; SNG Copenhagen 467.

 

Initially at @Ryro's suggestion I wanted to create a topic with animals on coins to see how many animals we can count here, but I think it's too vast and it would get either too crowded and difficult to follow or being an easy theme, nobody would post thinking others will.

So let's see your birds (don't be shy about your tetradrachms too!) and let's see how many we can add.

Ozie, excellent subject ☺️! I've always been a bird lover, especially birds of prey. Living in upstate NY eagles are a common sight, & without doubt, the most commonly seen bird on coins. Pictured below are two favorite coins in my collection depicting eagles. 1784083588_McAlee667(2).jpg.fe72473cac587693393c2263c92b61d6.jpg1354938815_192820LibertyMS65.jpg.e5b3f37998fe1f6b19cacd671c2127be.jpg

U.S.A. 1928 Saint-Gaudens  $20 Gold Coin

 

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Peacocks:

[IMG]
Faustina I, AD 138-140.
Roman AR Denarius, 3.10 g, 17.6 mm, 6 h.
Rome, AD 150 and later.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO, peacock walking right, head left, on scepter (?).
Refs: RIC 384(a); BMCRE 473-75; Cohen 175; Strack 453; RCV 4594; CRE 106.

[IMG] Diva Faustina II, AD 147-175.
Roman AR denarius, 2.73 g, 17.1 mm, 12 h.
Rome, AD 176-180.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, bust of Faustina II, draped, right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO, peacock standing facing with tail spread, head right.
Refs: RIC 743; BMCRE 712-13; Cohen/RSC 70; RCV --; CRE 200.
 
 
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Goose:

1736364348_MACEDONEion-HoledARTrihemiobol2541.JPG.17a732a707a888ff844fbff8a56e9d8a.JPG

MACEDON, Eion
AR Trihemiobol (Holed). 0.81g, 11.8mm.
MACEDON, Eion, circa 460-400 BC. HGC 3.1, 521; SNG Cop 174.
O: Goose standing right, head reverted; lizard above, retrograde N below bottom of goose.
R: Incuse square.

 

Ibis:

1783204697_HadrianAlexandriaIbisimage00029.jpg.3e2441c6f632a2f7888a938dbbb3240c.jpg

HADRIAN
AE Chalkous. 1.66g 13.7mm.
EGYPT, Alexandria, RY 10 (AD 125/6). Dattari (Savio) 7961; Geissen 926; RPC III 5627.
O: Laureate head of Hadrian to right.
R: L Δ-E, Ibis standing right.
Ex Jean-Pierre Righetti Collection

 

Falcon:

1066173470_Vespasian-AlexandriaObolFalcon2595.jpg.416eb90a27d52405ef7a374fe9224e4b.jpg

VESPASIAN
AE Obol. 7.91g, 23.7mm.
EGYPT, Alexandria, RY 5 = AD 72/3. RPC 2440; Emmett 222.5; Dattari 415; Milne 430.
O: AVTOK KAIΣ ΣEBAO VEΣΠAΣIANOV, laureate bust right.
R: Horus falcon wearing sekhmeti crown right; LE in left field.
Ex Dr Walter Neussel Collection

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Double-headed eagle.

Catherine II the Great Five Kopeks, 1781image.png.068af5dc42579a6d106a56de16dbdd8a.pngEkaterinburg. Copper, 42mm, 58.68g. Crowned monogram of Ekaterina II divides date within wreath. Crowned double-headed eagle (Eagle of 1780-1787), Е М, Five Kopecks. Edge: Reticulated (Bit 632).

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Like @zumbly I also got a Hadrian bird coin from Righetti's (second) Collection of Alexandrian. (This collection really put on display his enthusiasm for mechanical cleaning  without, as ASW commented, re-patinating them.... I've been wondering exactly what was going on with all that.) Perhaps his cleaning efforts also prevented Nomos (and RPC, at first, where it was previously 6058 ex. 3 AND 7) from realizing that the coin was illustrated in the Dattari-Savio Supplement. Zeus reclining on eagle:

 image.jpeg.e8f446097defe5fb9a4685ff65568afb.jpeg

*** CORRECTION: That should be Dattari-Savio 2007 not 2017!!!

I don't quite remember why I got two of these dolphin eagles. Maybe to have both a left and right head inverted example. Or because I love the "triptych" style photos so much I couldn't stop at one (hint: don't just flip your obv photo, you have to photo all three sides). I feel bad for that poor dolphin, being helplessly pecked on the head (hopefully not the eyes!) for eternity:

607606731_CONSERVATORI-IstrosARDrachm2Triptyc.png.7a69222390b83829696288cf602126df.png475982857_CONSERVATORI-IstrosARDrachm1DRAFT2.png.a87e4273e429ce8055b0ec320a93f125.png

 

 

Maybe some day I'll finish a full set of Kosons. For now I have the monogram stater and the drachm (plus a pair of Brutus Lictors denarii, but no stater sans monogram or Q. Pomponius Rufus eagle denarius, or the ΚΟΣΟΝ ΔΡΟΥΕΙΣ drachm). Unfortunately I still have both encapsulated :

CONSERVATORI-Koson-Stater-Crop.jpg.fbd75d833d639d1d94edb07c5974230b.jpg680925664_CONSERVATORI-KosonDrachm.png.f38afe27f3d1098561c9cd0a93f0a8d5.png

Edited by Curtis JJ
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Five-legged bird...

Series J Type 36 Secondary Phase Anglo Saxon Sceat, 710-760image.png.94e2676b47bee7c6cf48ce6d2070ad9d.png

York? Silver, 1.04g. Diademed head right, cross in front. Two birds right, cross in front (S 802D). The back 'legs' of the walking bird appear as feathers on other versions.

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image.jpeg.3c9e3f7430acb9e525832942b9130379.jpeg

Septimius Severus * Silver Denarius Rom 211 AD * RIC 191c * Av: DIVO SEVERO PIO * Rv: CONSECRATIO * Eagle

 

I have to say though - I'm not into birds at all. As an animal lover, I respect them. But I don't relate to them. Maybe it's because I was always attacked by our budgie when I was a child.... 🥴

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Posted (edited)

I will add another uncommon bird on a coin I like a lot, holding the record of the smallest and lightest coin in my collection

image.png.1d4aabf9d378def3d2f450f5ff632cf5.png

Ionia. Miletos circa 525-475 BC.
Hemitetartemorion AR Cf. Rosen 407/8. Klein 430; SNG Tubingen 3001
Head of a roaring lion l. R/ Quail standing l. within incuse square
5 mm., 0,08 g.
Possible Caria Mylasa

 

Edited by ambr0zie
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11 minutes ago, ambr0zie said:

I will add another uncommon bird on a coin I like a lot, holding the record of the smallest and lightest coin in my collection

My smallest coin also features a bird, although the coin is not so small and the bird much more common. The bird is probably an imitation of a Roman legionary standard.

Verica Minim, AD10-40image.png.c68bbf22fdd58f9a8a254470a507b97c.pngSilchester or Chichester, Atrebates tribe. Silver, 7mm, 0.35g. Wine cup; REX above. Eagle right; VERICA COMMI F around (S 159).

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Has anybody posted a chicken yet?

[IMG]
Pseudo-autonomous.
Roman provincial Æ 13 mm, 1.2 g.
Antioch, Pisidia, time of Antoninus Pius, AD 138-161.
Obv: ANTIOCH, draped bust of Mercury/Hermes (head assimilated to portrait of Marcus Aurelius as Caesar), left; to right, caduceus.
Rev: COLONI, chicken walking right.
Refs: RPC IV.3, 7350 (temporary); BMC 19.176,1 (pl. XXXI, 1); SNG von Aulock 4916; Krzyżanowska 140–1, VII.7–9; cf. SNG BN 1067.
 

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Posted · Supporter

Nice cock RC! It's a fatty!!

I was gonna post mine but it's had so many hands on it that when I show it to people I'm always having to explain what it is:

IMG_1765.PNG.7237c4862cb6ce403ed812abaae7ab51.PNG

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Some lovely birds shown...

1653318938_normal_lic2together(1).jpg.8583ac89ed70106250b8b0c447cf3213.jpg

 I AE Follis. 20mm dia/ 3.2gr

Obverse- IMP LIC LICINIVS PF AVG, laureate head right

Reverse- IOVI CON-SERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding victory and sceptre, eagle at foot with wreath in its beak,gamma to right.

Mint. SIS. RIC VII 8G (Siscia officina 3)

 

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This is the oldest coin in my pile that features a bird - the double-headed eagle of the Hapsburg Empire (descended from Rome & Byzantium) on the reverse

1697_3Kreuzer_LeopoldI_Obv.png.eee07698a12e4c51d1bc3f12aa1a3662.png
1697_3Kreuzer_LeopoldI_Rev.png.f64b23d922caafaea17661cbf3e4b0d6.png

This is another bird, one I happen to live with. He's not on a coin, but he should be. He would appreciate it if I would up my game and get some more birds-on-coins.

Lupe.png.99e2ac812f8160c6d5b280046c1097a1.png
 

 

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