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A weekend visit to my local coin shop and a world potpourri.


robinjojo
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On Saturday I visited my coin shop in Willow Glen, and this time focused on world coins, medals and tokens.  In all I purchased four.

France, AR octagonal jeton, 1830, St Gobain glass manufacturer, established in 1702.

19.70 grams

Normally I do not buy jetons. That's a specialty in itself, but if I find one that's particularly appealing, why not?

1026183374_D-CameraFranceARjeton1830StGobainglassmanufacturer170219.70gSal7-4-22.jpg.e1277bd294169094f1ed5a2ee97639b6.jpg

 

Anti-slavery AE token, London and Dublin, late 18th century, lettered edge.

8.97 grams

This is an early Abolitionist token.  In the ongoing struggle for human rights and dignity, this was a timely purchase in my view.

1971195502_D-CameraAntiSlaveryAEtokenlate18thcenletterededge8.97gSal7-4-22.jpg.7e79f0f1ca96b5ae7dc250214c5be51b.jpg 

 

Gloustershire, J. Whalley, AR token 2 shillings 6 pence, ex Davisson E-auction 33, Lot 172.

9.54 grams

2012115944_D-CameraGloustershireJ.WhalleyARtoken2shillings6penceexDavissonE-auction331729.54gSal7-4-22.jpg.01d5cf7a51702f481d4b426866977eed.jpg

 

Latvia, AR 5 Lati, 1931.

KM 9

24.96 grams

I used to own one of these beautiful and readily available crowns, but I sold it about three decades ago.  These coin are quite common, but finding one with minimal contact marks and decent surfaces can be a challenge.

According to Sal, the shop's owner, these coins were quite scarce prior to the dissolution of the Soviet Union.  After the breakup huge numbers of these coins came onto the market.

1330024817_D-CameraLatviaAR5Lati1931KM924.96gSal7-4-22.jpg.1293860bb8e13f976c0c91229b9da4a0.jpg

 

Note:  The coin was colloquially known as a Milda (a popular traditional Latvian woman's name). The model was Zelma Brauere (1900-1977), a proofreader in the State Securities Printing House.

2085051160_ZelmaiBrauerei(19001977)7-4-22.jpg.55811ff37d1a98359e8e717da6a03cea.jpg

 

So, that's it for now.  Please post your world coins (including the Baltic States), medals, jetons, tokens or anything else you wish.

Thank you.

Edited by robinjojo
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Very nice! I believe I have a copy of the Latvian coin sitting in a drawer. I bought it for a dollar or two when I lived in Latvia in 1995. I didn’t collect coins back then, but that one looked nice. 

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3 hours ago, robinjojo said:

On Saturday I visited my coin shop in Willow Glen, and this time focused on world coins, medals and tokens.  In all I purchased four.

France, AR octagonal jeton, 1830, St Gobain glass manufacturer, established in 1702.

19.70 grams

Normally I do not buy jetons. That's a specialty in itself, but if I find one that's particularly appealing, why not?

1026183374_D-CameraFranceARjeton1830StGobainglassmanufacturer170219.70gSal7-4-22.jpg.e1277bd294169094f1ed5a2ee97639b6.jpg

 

 

I like the jeton. I used to work for Saint Gobain

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Posted (edited)

@robinjojo, congratulations on your very nice purchases! I also have a British anti-slavery token, from 1795:

image.jpeg.02c34256aa8d49608896388868c2b4a5.jpeg

Great Britain, Anti-slavery halfpenny token, 1795 (AE 30 mm., 9.4 g.), catalogued as No. 1039a at p. 304 of P. & B. Withers, The Token Book: British Tokens of the 17th 18th and 19th Centuries and their Values (Galata 2010). Obv: African slave kneeling right, hands raised together in chains, AM I NOT A MAN AND A BROTHER / Rev. Clasped hands, MAY SLAVERY & OPPRESSION CEASE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD (rosette before legend)/ Edge: PAYABLE IN DUBLIN CORK OR BELFAST.

What does yours say on the edge? If you don't have a catalog, I could look yours up for you.

Also: what exactly distinguishes a jeton from a token? Do I understand correctly that instead of being used as substitute currency or for admission to an event or transportation, as tokens were used, jetons were used for gambling and for accounting purposes?

Edited by DonnaML
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That's a beautiful token, Donna!  Absolutely wonderful preservation.

The edge lettering of my token reads "Payable in London and Dublin". 

My understanding about jetons is that they didn't really have any monetary value, or at least they weren't treated that way.  Tokens, on the other hand, were used often in lieu of money, usually within a network of people or businesses (the "good for" tokens).  

That's my understanding.  Perhaps others can help illuminate the differences between jetons and tokens.

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Posted · Benefactor
46 minutes ago, robinjojo said:

That's a beautiful token, Donna!  Absolutely wonderful preservation.

The edge lettering of my token reads "Payable in London and Dublin". 

My understanding about jetons is that they didn't really have any monetary value, or at least they weren't treated that way.  Tokens, on the other hand, were used often in lieu of money, usually within a network of people or businesses (the "good for" tokens).  

That's my understanding.  Perhaps others can help illuminate the differences between jetons and tokens.

Thanks. Yours is Withers 1038a, also at p. 304.

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