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Sold at Roma


NewStyleKing

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£14000 + juice a bargain. The portrait is almost Bactrian in realism. The write up by Roma shows you couldn't trust anybody. An example was found in the very useful mixed Demetrios l hoard.

Generally quite a few coins took a bath for their investor owners.

 

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Get another! These are not quotidian old style  mass classic Athens or Constantinian AE's!  The Teos tetradrachm only went for £22K. Some Tenedos coins went unsold!  Coins of the Great Transformation are cheaper than coins of classical times generally.IMHO 

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6 minutes ago, NewStyleKing said:

Get another! These are not quotidian old style  mass classic Athens or Constantinian AE's!  The Teos tetradrachm only went for £22K. Some Tenedos coins went unsold!  Coins of the Great Transformation are cheaper than coins of classical times generally.IMHO 

Ok but what makes this coin special? Rarity is not rare.

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This 42lb lump of ? had also an estimate of £20K.......if you want it  it's still available. If you look at it long enough you can imagine all kinds of images in it. I can see a crouching Tiger left picture middle towards the top in gold!  I'd love to see it in a NGC plastic tomb!

Central Italy, uncertain mint cast Æ Aes Formatum. Circa 6th-4th century BC. Disk-shaped with rounded obverse / Flat. ICC -; cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2 var. (weight); cf. Nomos AG, obolos 25, 568 var. (weight), cf. Oslo Myntgalleri AS 28, 227 var. (shape) (hammer: 500,000 NOK). 19.5kg, 275mm.

 

21283.42.1_1.jpg

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3 minutes ago, John Conduitt said:

Ok but what makes this coin special? Rarity is not rare.

Only a few known of this interesting character at a most interesting time of Seleucid suicide and the artistry of the portrait is of Bactrian quality...a coin of the Greet Transformation when coins became interesting and large and well made !

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9 minutes ago, NewStyleKing said:

Only a few known of this interesting character at a most interesting time of Seleucid suicide and the artistry of the portrait is of Bactrian quality...a coin of the Greet Transformation when coins became interesting and large and well made !

Ok so if you want Orophernes, this is it. Fair enough.

That 'formatum' could be anything. Most formatum at least has some proper 'form'. How do they make out it has historical importance? £20k probably only just covers the shipping, though.

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31 minutes ago, NewStyleKing said:

This 42lb lump of ? had also an estimate of £20K.......if you want it  it's still available. If you look at it long enough you can imagine all kinds of images in it. I can see a crouching Tiger left picture middle towards the top in gold!  I'd love to see it in a NGC plastic tomb!

Central Italy, uncertain mint cast Æ Aes Formatum. Circa 6th-4th century BC. Disk-shaped with rounded obverse / Flat. ICC -; cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2 var. (weight); cf. Nomos AG, obolos 25, 568 var. (weight), cf. Oslo Myntgalleri AS 28, 227 var. (shape) (hammer: 500,000 NOK). 19.5kg, 275mm.

 

21283.42.1_1.jpg

Has to be a typo. I have one that is 140mm and 3.1kg

I don't have a coin archives account, acsearch the largest is 180mm and 2.7kg.

Screenshot_20230707_052810_SamsungInternet.jpg.9937d3fee28813cd1a438f05ef0793a2.jpg

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Wow, I like the part about the reverse inscription done in permanent marker. 🤯 If only the Romans had known, they wouldn't have had to go to all the bother of cutting dies. 😄

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5 hours ago, NewStyleKing said:

This 42lb lump of ? had also an estimate of £20K.......if you want it  it's still available. If you look at it long enough you can imagine all kinds of images in it. I can see a crouching Tiger left picture middle towards the top in gold!  I'd love to see it in a NGC plastic tomb!

Central Italy, uncertain mint cast Æ Aes Formatum. Circa 6th-4th century BC. Disk-shaped with rounded obverse / Flat. ICC -; cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2 var. (weight); cf. Nomos AG, obolos 25, 568 var. (weight), cf. Oslo Myntgalleri AS 28, 227 var. (shape) (hammer: 500,000 NOK). 19.5kg, 275mm.

 

21283.42.1_1.jpg

I wonder if they enforced the rule that you have to roll coins before depositing them in the bank back then...

Also, if you think that's big, just wait until they dig up the vending machines that accepted them!

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9 hours ago, NewStyleKing said:

£14000 + juice a bargain. The portrait is almost Bactrian in realism. The write up by Roma shows you couldn't trust anybody. An example was found in the very useful mixed Demetrios l hoard.

Generally quite a few coins took a bath for their investor owners.

 

Sorry, if I had "£14000 + juice" to spend on a single coin, I would never buy this one. I don't care how rare it is, I think it's rather ugly and unappealing with all the scratches. I don't see anything special about the portrait's quality, either. To each their own!

Edited by DonnaML
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2 hours ago, DonnaML said:

Sorry, if I had "£14000 + juice" to spend on a single coin, I would never buy this one. I don't care how rare it is, I think it's rather ugly and unappealing with all the scratches. I don't see anything special about the portrait's quality, either. To each their own!

This is actually a good "budget" win for the type. Granted, I wouldn't spend 14k on any coin, but of all the coins in the auction this is the only one I found intriguing. Overall this was the least interesting Roma auction I've seen.

I'm not sure if this is the same coin that was listed and withdrawn by Roma in 2022.

What I'm hoping is there's a hidden cache of these and the prices will come down...

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Sold for £22K +juice.

This portrait is reproduced on Cappadocian drachms and are common. This coin has the Mithradatic reverse  that was standard until being replaced with a stag at the time Eupator took Pergamon.

Some of these coins was found in the fabled Poggio Picenze hoard IGCH imprisoned in the Archaeolgica Chieti. Luckily Morkholm had access to them and published a paper on them in Essays Robinson, otherwise they too would disappear into the numismatic curatorial fug of Chieti . 

 

 

 

4001.298.14_1.jpg

Edited by NewStyleKing
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