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My first bottlecap - Antiochos VI


thenickelguy
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None of this info came out of my hat, I found it elsewhere and hope it is accurate. I do like to add information rather than just post pictures.

AntiochosVIDionysos145to142BCSerratusOBV.jpg.5a97695af381f54b2cfb66a147a41ba9.jpg

AntiochosVIDionysos145to142BCSerratusREV.jpg.9d6a66e5ca9f3cc66a60d8f49dd3c6cb.jpg

Antiochos VI Dionysos 145-142 BC
Serratus (Bottlecap)
Antioch mint
Elephant on reverse

Antiochos VI Dionysos

(145-142), AE Serratus, Antioch mint. Av.: Radiate and diademed head right, crowned with ivy of Antiochus VI right Rv.: BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ/ ANTIOXOY/ EΠΙΦΑNOYΣ∕ ΔΙΟNYΣOY, Elephant advancing left, holding torch in trunk. SC 2006. VF, Attractive desert patina

Weight: 6.92 g.

Antiochus VI Dionysus (c. 148–142/1 BC), king of the Hellenistic Seleucid kingdom.
Antiochus VI did not actually rule. Either already in 145 or in early 144 BC he was nominated by the general Diodotus Tryphon as heir to the throne in opposition to Demetrius II.
In c. 142/141 BC, the young king died.
Some ancient authors make Diodotus Tryphon responsible for the death of the king, others write that he died during a surgery.

Antioch on the side of the Orontes River, was a Hellenistic city. Its ruins lie near the current city of Antakya, Turkey, to which the ancient city lends its name.

Antioch was founded near the end of the fourth century BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals.
The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Royal Road.
It eventually rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East. The city was the capital of the Seleucid Empire until 63 BC, when the Romans took control, making it the seat of the governor of the province of Syria.

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very kool coin nickel dude...Antiochus 3 lQQks similar to that also and there's a slew of Antiochus's (1st 2nd, soter Theos, etc.)ter etc)to collect..i've started several times but never got passed Theos as of yet...:)

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Benefactor
Posted · Benefactor
Posted (edited)

thenickelguy => nice!! ... I see you've snagged another winner ... and once again, it is another new coin-avenue to explore (well played)

 

I had a couple of sweet bottle-caps (Serratus) ... I will post one of my ol' favs

 

 

Demetrios I Serratus AE17 (below)

162 - 150 BC

Diameter: 16.5mm

Weight: 4.41 grams

Obverse: Horse

Reverse: Elephant

Reference: SNG Spaer 1299

NOTE => this is Demetrios I (Seleukid King) which is different from Demetrios I (Bactrian King)

Ex-stevex6

Demetrios I Serrate.jpg

 

... they are very cool coin types, eh?

Keep-up the awesome job!!

 

 

Edited by Steve
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5 hours ago, LONGINUS said:

Great coin , @thenickelguy

 

This type has always been one of my favorites — most likely because it was among my first Seleucid coins.

Here are a few serrated and a few animals.

image.jpeg.2fb883caf1f24f0ccb85c43c92e6abac.jpeg

image.jpeg.a945471c50ab978abae8e073686513f9.jpeg

image.jpeg.b133a44b1869877673775057dacc3f35.jpeg

image.jpeg.ab626298cd4d1465baef23e527a3b622.jpeg

That's a really nice presentation, Longinus. Did you make it, or does it come from Deacon Ray, or is it from somewhere else? In any case, it looks great, and I like the animal organization of it.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, NathanB said:

That's a really nice presentation, Longinus. Did you make it, or does it come from Deacon Ray, or is it from somewhere else? In any case, it looks great, and I like the animal organization of it.

@NathanB, I must confess that I am Deacon RayI always enjoy the historical names that members select for their avatars, so I chose “Longinus” when I signed up for ”NVMIS FORVMS.” Longinus is a Roman soldier who was present at the Crucifixion of Jesus. He’s not named in but a few translations.

Also, many thanks for your kind words. At the beginning of June I was ready to resume my ancient coin collecting pursuits after a five month educational sabbatical. When I visited the old site, it was a ghost town but before too long, I started receiving emails from members inviting me to this great new site.

Edited by LONGINUS
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On 6/16/2022 at 12:42 PM, LONGINUS said:

@NathanB, I must confess that I am Deacon RayI always enjoy the historical names that members select for their avatars, so I chose “Longinus” when I signed up for ”NVMIS FORVMS.” Longinus is a Roman soldier who was present at the Crucifixion of Jesus. He’s not named in but a few translations.

Also, many thanks for your kind words. At the beginning of June I was ready to resume my ancient coin collecting pursuits after a five month educational sabbatical. When I visited the old site, it was a ghost town but before too long, I started receiving emails from members inviting me to this great new site.

Hi Longinus/Deacon Ray! Ah-ha! So now I know why the art seemed to be the same! You have a real talent for digital presentation of ancient coins!  I definitely admire it.

Regarding the other site, I stopped posting there a long time ago, and so I missed all the fuss that caused so many people to migrate here.  I'm still not 100% certain of what happened, exactly.  (No need to explain--that's ok.) Anyway, I ended out getting an email sort of out of the blue that mentioned this site, and then I decided I'd try writing again--but this time, I'm staying clear of politics entirely! That can be very hard because ancient politics is a major part of ancient numismatics, and ancient politics intersect with modern politics.  But I will try to stay clear anyway.  

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Nothing says "Seleucid" like a bottle cap with an elephant! This one is ex-Houghton:

[IMG]
Laodike IV, wife and sister of both Seleucus IV and Antiochus IV.
Selucia in Pieria, 175-164 BC.
AE 3.33 gm; 15 mm.
Obv: Veiled bust of Laodike IV, r.
Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, elephant head l.; prow.
Refs: Houghton, CSE 113 (plate coin); Forrer 183.

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