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‘Incredible’ Roman bathers’ gems lost 2,000 years ago found near Hadrian’s Wall


robinjojo

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I just came across this article online.

When something goes down the drain in our times, it will usually take a long, long trip, unless it ends up in an elbow or trap.  In Roman times going down the drain did not entail such a long journey, but still lost is lost.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2023/jan/28/roman-bathers-gems-carved-stones-archaeologists-hadrians-wall

 

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I love the curse, from a curse tablet, quoted in the article, directed at an individual who was responsible for a theft at a Roman bath:

"One of those curses targets a ring thief: 'So long as someone, whether slave or free, keeps silent or knows anything about it, he may be accursed in blood, and eyes and every limb and even have all intestines quite eaten away if he has stolen the ring.'"

I think our modern fast food diet will take care of the intestines bit.

 

Edited by robinjojo
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As some of you know, I was an avid gemstone collector for many years.  I have admired the Roman intaglio gemstones for their beautiful craftsmanship over the years, and finally acquired one last year.     

1073999786_D-CameraRomanjasperitaglosilverring3rd-4thcenADstone11mm25mmx15mmring11.33g8-10-22.jpg.80798fdc82d819e8b88a1a1ee2bdcf12.jpg

Edited by robinjojo
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Amazing. Here's a link to the relevant section of the website of one reputable dealer in France who sells not only ancient coins but also ancient intaglios and similar items: https://odysseus-numismatique.com/en/boutique/glyptique/ . I've never bought an ancient intaglio, from Odysseus or anyone, but I've been tempted! I continue to find it astonishing how tiny some of them are, like the smallest of ancient Greek fractions.  This one -- identified as "Buste drapé d’une impératrice de la période des Antonins (Faustine Jeune, Lucilla ou Crispine), S C dans les champs" -- is only 8 x 6.3 mm.:

Odysseus Numismatic Glyptic Engraved Stones IMPERATRICE - CORNALINE • Roman Intaglio

Perhaps @Roman Collector can identify it more precisely!

Edited by DonnaML
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Indeed it may.  I wonder sometimes where all the stuff that we throw away or loose will be in a thousand years or more.  What will future archeologists and anthropologists think of our civilization?   Will a encrusted smart phone be on exhibit at a major museum, viewed by thousands of visitors? 

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