Jump to content

New 90 mm. AND NOW A 100 mm. French Art Deco Medal by Paul-Marcel Dammann


DonnaML

Recommended Posts

  • Benefactor

At a recent Noonan's auction, I purchased my third French Art Deco medal by Paul-Marcel Dammann; this one is larger than the other two, but I think all three are beautiful.

France ca. 1920, Paris Mint, Aviation, AE Art Deco medal  by Paul-Marcel Dammann (1885-1939). Obv. Wind bride with plaited hair standing nude on left leg at edge of mountain pinnacle with right knee bent upward, attaching wing to her right ankle; in left field, FERIAM SIDERA* in two lines; in right field, MCMXX; at rim at 5:00, M. DAMMANN / Rev: Two fledglings in stork's nest at left atop mountain pinnacle; to right, parents hover in air nearby, encouraging them to fly / Edge: Lettering: BRONZE; Engraver’s Mark: Torch or Cornucopia?**. 90 mm., 226.8 g. CGMP [Catalogue général illustré des éditions de la Monnaie de Paris] Vol. 3 (1871-1945), p. 115. Purchased from Noonans, Auction 264, 16 Nov. 2022, Lot 916; ; ex. Collection of Art Medals formed by Dr Edith Greenwood (d. 1987).

image.png.6ce2015158c84ed041b7c10078c430fa.png

* The quotation "Feriam Sidera" ("[I] will touch the stars") was taken from by Dammann from Horace, who ended his first ode, to Maecenas, 35-36: "Quodsi me lyricis vatibus inseres, sublimi feriam sidera vertice" ("Yet if you join me with the lyrical singers, I will lift my head to the stars").

**According to an article by the late Rich Hartzog on the subject of Director and Engraver Edge Marks of the Paris Mint, still available via the Wayback Machine (see https://web.archive.org/web/20120814222920/http://www.exonumia.com/art/art_04.htm), the metal of Paris Mint medals (Argent, Cuivre, or, in this case, Bronze) began to be inscribed on their edges in 1841-42. The name of the metal was usually accompanied by a symbol or symbols representing the Paris Mint Director’s edge mark (during this period, either none or a cornucopia), and/or the Paris Mint Engraver’s edge mark (from 1896-1930, a torch). On this medal, I find it difficult to determine which symbol is intended (see the photo); from illustrations I’ve seen, the cornucopia usually has a curve in its body, while the torch has a curve at its tip. Any and all opinions are welcome! [Edited to add: I think it's a cornucopia.]

image.jpeg.a362bcc2027bc8598302b6bdc1a09a26.jpeg

Here are my other two Dammann medals:

France 1927, Paris Mint, “Télégraphie sans Fil” (Wireless), AE medal  by Paul-Marcel Dammann (1885-1939). Obv: Iris (in Greek mythology, the personification of the rainbow and a messenger of the gods), holding a caduceus, travels through the sky, zodiac signs behind her / Rev: A stylized microphone or transmitter enclosing the Earth emits wavelengths through a starry sky, TSF below (Telégraphie Sans Fil) / Edge: Lettering:  BRONZE; Engraver’s Mark: Torch or Cornucopia?*. 68 mm., 137.2 g. CGMP [Catalogue général illustré des éditions de la Monnaie de Paris] Vol. 3 (1871-1945), 116A. See also Mark Jones, The Art of the Medal (British Museum 1979), at pp. 155-156 & ill. no. 423; https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O89899/wireless-medal-dammann-paul-marcel/. Purchased from Charles Riley, Feb. 2022.

image.jpeg.800dbbc9dba2d034a20e9d7ff85d17db.jpeg

*See 2nd footnote to Dammann’s Aviation medal re Paris Mint edge marks. As with that medal, I find it very difficult to tell whether a cornucopia or torch is intended (see photo):

image.jpeg.bf2662a1883ae906804a8ff74767e255.jpeg

France 1932, Paris Mint, 25th anniversary of the Compagnie Parisienne de Distribution d'Électricité [C.P.D.E.] (the Parisian Electric Distribution Company), AE Medal by Paul-Marcel Dammann (1885-1939).   Obv. Personification of electricity (woman’s head, facing, with rays of the sun emanating from her) / Rev.woman bestowing light on the Parisian skyline, C-P-D-E MCMVII / Edge: Lettering: BRONZE; Chief Engraver’s Mark: Wing? (triangular).  65 mm., 115.1 grams. Maier 319 [Nicolas Maier, French Medallic Art 1870-1940 (Munich 2010)].

image.jpeg.95ee54dd75adeaf490826c667cedc8e5.jpeg

image.jpeg.db0c59ce47e7a3af1d19079986418540.jpeg

I think the three of them go nicely together; here are some photos I took the other day that show the relative sizes better than the individual photos of the medals:

image.jpeg.cbcf623635e43acaf27dd593f1797c99.jpeg

image.jpeg.e5ab5de9c1f9a44d8c2db8584e12bc37.jpeg

image.jpeg.34c18898b6a74decaaeb58b43a79db2a.jpeg

Please post any and all "art" medals you may have, whether from France or another country, and whether Art Deco, Art Nouveau, or any other style. (I think the two more recent Dammann medals are clearly Art Deco ; my new Aviation medal arguably has elements of both Art Nouveau and Art Deco, and might be considered transitional between the two. See the discussion by Mark Jones at pp. 152-156 of his 1979 book The Art of the Medal, published by the British Museum.)

Edited by DonnaML
  • Like 21
  • Cookie 1
  • Heart Eyes 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
6 minutes ago, expat said:

Each one standing alone  is amazing. Arranged as a group as you have done conveys an outstanding display of artisitic talent and beauty. Great collection and thanks for sharing

You're very welcome! I think Dammann might be my favorite of all the French medallists active from the 1910s-1930s.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A French Art Deco medal by Raymond Delamarre:

Delamarre.jpg.684972ef44913603a150d1cce72e68b1.jpg

France, after 1925. Delamarre, Raymond (1890–1986), French Mint Perseus and Andromeda Octagonal. 76mm approx 220g.

There was a similar edition of 10 in 1925. The French Mint apparently first issued in 1931, this is the circa 1950 restrike, or at least I think so.  Maybe they are still making them?

There used to be an amazing little gallery/museum on 38th street in Manhattan that sold contemporary medals and had exhibits of historical medals of the 1800s and 1900s.  It closed last year.  If it hadn't been for that place I would not have been able to learn about medals.  They don't show up at art galleries or coin shows.

  • Like 9
  • Cookie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
1 hour ago, Ed Snible said:

A French Art Deco medal by Raymond Delamarre:

Delamarre.jpg.684972ef44913603a150d1cce72e68b1.jpg

France, after 1925. Delamarre, Raymond (1890–1986), French Mint Perseus and Andromeda Octagonal. 76mm approx 220g.

There was a similar edition of 10 in 1925. The French Mint apparently first issued in 1931, this is the circa 1950 restrike, or at least I think so.  Maybe they are still making them?

There used to be an amazing little gallery/museum on 38th street in Manhattan that sold contemporary medals and had exhibits of historical medals of the 1800s and 1900s.  It closed last year.  If it hadn't been for that place I would not have been able to learn about medals.  They don't show up at art galleries or coin shows.

Too bad I never knew about that place. The medals dealer Paul Bosco never seems to answer emails anymore, but as I understand it his store -- now apparently back in its old Second Avenue location -- is still open sometimes. I mostly used to buy historical/commemorative medals from him, but he also always used to have a good selection of art medals. 

As my post indicates, the side markings on Paris Mint medals, and the questions of what's an original vs. a restrike, and when a given restrike was issued (all apparently of little interest to the French!) remains largely a mystery to me despite all the guides I've looked at, such as the one I cited. At least since around 1959, the date of a restrike is supposed to be indicated on the edge of a medal in addition to the name of the metal. As far as whether they're still making them, it's my understanding that as long as the Paris Mint still has the dies (and they still have most, dating back at least 500 years), they'll fill an order for a single restrike even if the medal isn't one for which restrikes are generally for sale. How much they charge, I have no idea.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have some medals in my Artemis Diana/Artemis Collection

1392872661_Medaillen_Artemis_15_fac-Kopie.png.2d5083f3c68fdc5f91d4904df9fd81d9.png

Diana

Av.: Diana, BROOK GREEN GARDENS SOUTH CAROLINA

Rv.: THE ORIGINAL LAYOUT OF THE SCULPTURE GARDEN BY ANNA HYATT HUNTINGTON 1932

signed Sergey Eylanbekov *1960

Bronze, 77mm

 

medaillen_artemis_10_fac.jpg.9cadf795cdf44503e26b3bf64c367274.jpg

ARTEMIS

Eugène-Baptiste Doumenc (born 1873, year of death unknown)

1937

Obv: ARTEMIΣ, Artemis to the left with young goat.

Rev: leer

AE, 60 mm, 86g.

 

normal_Medaillen_Artemis_09_fac.jpg.2a9349714e2f96a10b44772fe7b7e04b.jpg

Artemis
Medal by Raymond Delamarre
1890–1986

Raymond Delamarre (1890–1986) was a French sculptor and medalist. His output in both spheres was huge, and he played a major role in the Art Déco movement. (wikipedia)

Obv: ARTEMIΣ, Artemis running left, stag behind, squirrel underneath
Rev: Bow, quiver, horn and rifle
AE, 50mm, 69g
Ref.: Monnaie de Paris M. 2227

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

I should probably point out that even though we've all been warned many times to be extremely cautious buying ancient coins on ebay -- and I've bought only a couple there out of all my ancient coins -- ebay is probably still (as it was 20 years ago) the best source for finding French and other art medals. I'm certainly not aware of any issue with counterfeits.  The worst that's likely to happen is that the date the dealer provides for the medal will be incorrect, as with the many examples I've seen (on and outside ebay) of Dammann's 1932 25th-anniversary Paris electricity medal (see above) wrongly described as being from 1907, because of the MCMVII date inscribed on the medal itself. Or that a pre-1959 Paris Mint restrike without a date on the edge will be incorrectly described as an original strike, something that can be difficult for anyone to determine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

WoWiE @DonnaML!!! Incredible medals. And the artistry. I'm just floored. Thanks for sharing. Here are two of my favorite medals that happen to be Parisienne. 

Here's a 65 MM chonker:

IMG_0810(1).jpg.21a2bcce4ad5a4844cc35cd989e2e87e.jpg

Napoleon I. Bonaparte,

 

 

France, 1804-1814, 1815, one. Br.-Hohlmed. O.J. unsigned. Uniform. Brb. Napoleon I. r. 65mm. vz

Former: Emporium Hamburg

 

And to keep things artsy and bronze here is my only modern fourée. This type was only made in bronze and on a couple high points on the relief, sure enough, you can tell that some enterprising Frenchie put some silver frosting on the chocolate cake:

IMG_2605(1).PNG.0bf2d1092443646addb3d1cf078a8350.PNG

Napoleonic medals NAPOLEONE BONAPARTE Napoleon period, from 1795 to 1815. Medal 1807. Gr. 13.30 mm 31.5 Dr. NAPOLEON EMPEREUR ET ROI. Head graduate at S. Rv. PAIX ET COMMERCE. Mercury sitting towards d., on a stump, holds caduceus and emptying cornucopia; in exercise, 1807. Julius 1832. Rare. Spl

Ex: in Asta

 

 

Edited by Ryro
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

For anyone interested, I posted photos of most of my Art Nouveau medals, both French and British, back in June, at https://www.numisforums.com/topic/229-chasing-beauty-what-is-beauty-post-your-most-beautiful-world-coins-and-medals/page/2/#comment-5022 .

But here is one more Art Deco medal from the 1930s that I own, not by Dammann but by Jean Vernon:

France 1935, Paris Mint, Compagnie Générale Transatlantique, Normandie Ocean Liner Inaugural Voyage Medal, Le Havre to New York, by Jean Vernon (1897-1975). AE 68 mm., 145.5 g., in original circular cardboard case.  Obv. Standing female figure in high relief with head left and arms raised, holding in left hand the bridle and reins of a hippocamp (Sea Horse), rearing left above waves, whom she has just freed; below to left, ‘NORMANDIE’; to right, Jean Vernon / Rev. The Normandie at sea, three-quarters left, under steam, in high relief; above, ‘NORMANDIE’ • 79280 TX; in exergue, in four lines, CIE GLE [Compagnie Générale] TRANSATLANTIQVE - French Line - LE HAVRE • NEW • YORK – 1935 / Edge: Lettering: BRONZE; Engraver’s Mark: Cornucopia of Paris Mint. Maier 333 (ill. p. 353). Purchased from Hedley Betts, San Jose, CA.

image.jpeg.1dbd9e7c305290e9e87d30b404de0887.jpeg

image.jpeg.e2c2d4ae27c492717ecae1d3971e63ef.jpeg

The top of the original cardboard case:

image.jpeg.30ba4c519c2cd49eb9a9afac4865e5d6.jpeg

PS: If anyone has any idea what "79280 TX" means, please let me know!

Edited by DonnaML
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/7/2022 at 11:48 PM, DonnaML said:

If anyone has any idea what "79280 TX" means, please let me know!

I had a suspicion it was related to weight.

From Wikipedia:

Normandie had a successful year but Queen Mary, Cunard White Star Line's superliner, entered service in the summer of 1936. Cunard White Star said Queen Mary would surpass 80,000 tons. At 79,280 tons, Normandie would no longer be the world's largest. The CGT increased Normandie's size, mainly through the addition of an enclosed tourist lounge on the aft boat deck. Following these and other alterations, she measured 83,423 gross register tons.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor
56 minutes ago, ChrisB said:

I had a suspicion it was related to weight.

From Wikipedia:

Normandie had a successful year but Queen Mary, Cunard White Star Line's superliner, entered service in the summer of 1936. Cunard White Star said Queen Mary would surpass 80,000 tons. At 79,280 tons, Normandie would no longer be the world's largest. The CGT increased Normandie's size, mainly through the addition of an enclosed tourist lounge on the aft boat deck. Following these and other alterations, she measured 83,423 gross register tons.

Thanks, @ChrisB! I admit that it didn't even occur to me that the number referred to the ship's weight. I wasn't aware that competition to be the world's largest ship by tonnage was a thing back then!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • DonnaML changed the title to New 90 mm. AND NOW A 100 mm. French Art Deco Medal by Paul-Marcel Dammann
  • Benefactor
Posted · Benefactor

And here's my fourth Paul-Marcel Dammann Art Deco medal, at 100 mm. even larger than the last one above:

France 1924, Nike, Goddess of Olympic Victory, AE medal by Paul-Marcel Dammann (1885-1939). Obv. Head of Nike right, wing and olive sprig in hair, small olive sprig below, NI – KE across fields / Rev. Nude ancient Greek Olympic winner standing right and holding statuette of Nike (Victory) with arms raised, ancient Olympia in background; in exergue, P.M. DAMMANN. Edge: BRONZE with triangle (signifying striking at private mint; see https://blog.cgb.fr/une-semaine-une-medaille--n-19-,9151.html). 100 mm., 429 g. Commemorates 1924 Paris Olympic Games (VIIIe Olympiad). Not in any catalog I’ve found. One example on ACSearch, sold for 580 GBP at Baldwin’s Auction 93, 5 May 2015, Lot 648, characterized as “Rare.” Examples exist adapted for Olympic games with the addition of a rugby ball, javelin, bow and arrow, club, and discus around edge of obverse; see specimen sold at  Ingrid O'Neil Mail Bid Auction No. 74, Olympic Games Memorabilia 1896-2014, 4 Oct. 2014, Lot 19 (photo at http://ioneil.com/site/auction/a74/a74_all_color.pdf).

image.jpeg.0e2d686e9197dcdc13bafbbd86749245.jpeg

On its stand:

image.jpeg.1154d9c968b53c5fa9c87fdc655ddb6a.jpeg

image.jpeg.5fadf791a4d01b4ee2ba50820d093f82.jpeg

On a shelf with my three other Dammann medals:

image.jpeg.4e6cca441d597c29eb7da7a1be62e27b.jpeg

Please post anything Art Deco (or Art Deco-ish), and/or anything relating to the Olympic Games, modern or ancient.

  • Like 5
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...