Jump to content

Rare Ptolemaic Tetradrachm minted under Ptolemy I Soter.


KyNumis
 Share

Recommended Posts

Good evening everyone. I wanted to make this post for evaluations on this Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm. I know the type is definitely pretty rare, but since there is a substantial amount of damage it could take away from the value quite a lot, Here's NGC's photo

Screenshot_20221127-015154_Chrome.jpg.ed013575089b65ceadd952d21ea6015a.jpg

Apparently this type can range from 15,000USD to 35,000USD. I'm not sure what this is worth since it appears to have been chipped in antiquity, and is missing lettering.

Nomos Example (Sold 33,000 CHF)

image00269.jpg.c6ab40f05ca8da6aee0774f3ad948c01.jpg

CNG Example That Sold for 20,000$ in August

image00001.jpg.fee9335fdd3ffd02a26373d17971c875.jpg

CNG Example (Sold 12,000$ On 2006)

720989.jpg.75dc8272b699161ebc2157dcac400f6f.jpg

Nomos Example (Sold 20,000$) 

image00182.jpg.497345b284a1e5643a2816f5555423a0.jpg

  • Like 10
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@KyNumis. I am surely not an expert on this type but as I can see this coin is a pretty rare and expensive type . The missing lettering is something that will decrease the value but If you want to buy it , you should expect a few thousand dollars . I have also seen this example for 5.500 USD a year before :

image00153.jpg.47e5a1d18ea80d25178436a5ca56ff72.jpg

This coin is historically important because it marks the beginning of the shift by Alexander's successors away from the inherited stock of coin types used by Alexander and Philip II, his father. Ptolemy, then satrap of Egypt, substituted for the young Hercules used by Alexander, a portrait of Alexander himselfPtolemy had Alexander depicted wearing a diadem under an elephant headdress, because he was conqueror of India; also with the divine attributes of the horn of Ammon, the aegis of Zeus, and two snakes around his neck .

Edited by The Pontian
  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, KyNumis said:

Thanks for the reply! I remember seeing that example posted elsewhere and a friend tried to bid on it, I was pretty surprised it went that low, I guess it depends on the auction or buyer 

It surely depends from the popularity of the auction house and of course the bidders that are interested in this coin . I wish you to purchase this beautiful coin one day ! 😄👍

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

The damage makes it very difficult to price. The main features are still there though. My rough guess is a hammer between $2k-$3k, though you may see less if it's not a mainstream auction or more in a place like Stacks or Heritage.

Personally, I prefer the later issues with Athena, even though they're not nearly as rare. FWIW, the damage on my coin roughly halved its value, though made the type affordable for me. 🙂 

331A7180-Edit.jpg.a065b9b9cc6638d789532fdbc1fccc8e.jpg

Ptolemy I 311-305 BCE
27.5 mm 14.6g 1h
Sv.162 (37 ex) - Cop.29 - GC.7750 var. - BMC.- - MP.6
Avers : Buste cornu et diadémé d'Alexandre le Grand sous les traits de Zeus-Ammon à droite, coiffé de la dépouille d'éléphant avec l'égide.
Revers : Athéna Promachos ou Alkidemos marchant à droite, brandissant une javeline de la main droite et tenant un bouclier de la gauche ; dans le champ à gauche, un casque corinthien, un monogramme et un aigle sur un foudre tourné à droite.
Ex CGB

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be honest, when dealing with really rare coins like this, I wouldn't mind a bit of damage or legends off the flan as long as it doesn't significantly detract from the main details of the coin itself. Not everyone can afford super-expensive coins, and it would still be cool to own such an interesting and historically important type. I think the portrait on the OP coin and the seated figure of Zeus on the reverse are both in decent shape, so if the coin is comparatively "affordable" it would still be an attractive buy. It's definitely a coin with a great story and some character to boot. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was the under-bidder.  I was already watching the lot.  If the transaction is smooth, the buyer got a bargain.

The coin was offered on eBay by someone with 185 feedback, mostly for non-coin items.

The coin was described as "Drachm" and "NGC Fine" when it was a tetradrachm and NGC AU.

Edited by Ed Snible
add details
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Ed Snible said:

I was the under-bidder.  I was already watching the lot.  If the transaction is smooth, the buyer got a bargain.

The coin was offered on eBay by someone with 185 feedback, mostly for non-coin items.

The coin was described as "Drachm" and "NGC Fine" when it was a tetradrachm and NGC AU.

That's exactly correct. I was going to bid but it seems the price climbed too high. The seller also had a idyma drachm which was supposed to sell at heritage auctions for around 500$, But the coin ended up going for 129$.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Benefactor

This is definitely a rare type for Ptolemy I, who issue tetradrachms with the lion headdress of Hercules (Alexander III) a later the much more common tetradrachms with his portrait.  The prices for the elephant headdress are high for choice examples, but I lack knowledge on the price differential between the advancing Athena reverse versus the seated Zeus reverse. 

The coin your considering has the merit of have strong detail and a very nice portrait of Alexander III.  The minus side is the corrosion that has eliminated some detail on the reverse.  The straight edge seems to be just the way the flan was made - I don't think that the flan was filed or clipped.  If it was, that would sure have been noted by NGC.

Whether you buy it or not should be based on the merits of the coin and not the information on the slab.  What is the coin priced at?

My Ptolemy I lion headdress tetradrachm is very dark, no doubt to a thick layer of horn silver.  The coin looks pretty much the way it was found, I think.  Note that the weight of this coin puts it closer to the Egyptian standard that was used for Ptolemy I's portrait coins, so this may be a late minting of this type, at a branch mint.  The less sophisticated dies would suggest this.

Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, tetradrachm,, Uncertain Cypriot mint (Kition?).

Svoronos 124  

14.7 grams

1701462892_D-CameraPtolemyISotertet.UncertainCypriotmintKitionSvoronos12414.7g01-9-21.jpg.03dcaf70bd90e78c36a25c6ef8fd76d9.jpg

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...