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Enormous Hoard Found in Scotland


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Amazing.  It would be interesting to find out whether Galloway was under English control at some early interval in both Edward II and Robert the Bruce's reigns.  That might go some distance toward explaining the absence of Bruce's coins.  ...Otherwise, you could also expect to find some of Alexander III.  ...When did Robert begin his own coinage?

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Belated thanks to @John Conduitt, for raising the issue (pun intended) of The Bruce's coinage.  In partial answer to my own question (following an after-work nap), this is what the 2015 Spink Coins of Scotland, Ireland and the Islands has to say about Robert's issues.  Starting with the kind of historical context which is likely to be redundant to any of you who's paying attention.

After Robert was "crowned king at Scone in 1306 [Edward II was crowned the following year....], Edinburgh was not recaptured by the Scots until 1313, the year before victory over Edward at Bannockburn.  [Where two of my English ancestors, a knight banneret and an earl, were taken prisoner and killed, respectively.  Just starting with the massacre at Berwick, it's kind of like, poetic justice, anyone?]  Hoard evidence would seem to indicate that there were no coins issued until shortly before 1320 and may have been connected with the recovery of Berwick."  (Introduction to Robert Bruce, p. 22.)

(Another edit:)  Here's my not untypical penny of Alexander III, demonstrating how long his coins were in circulation.

image.jpeg.167f4bdf28c2efed03bd85375a6e3096.jpeg

 

 

Edited by JeandAcre
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It is believed by many researchers that approximately 50 million pennies were minted by Scottish mints during the reign of Alexander III(1249-1286), his coinage was far more prolific than any other reigns because of the growth of trade with Europe.  While it is likely there are Scottish minted coins in the above hoard, English pennies would have come north with the occupying forces from the armies of Edward I(1272-1307) and Edward II(1307-1327) and would have been preferred by the English and their Scottish subordinates.

 

scotlandalexiii28ptsx2.jpg.41d4fd5132afac03608ea37313bc4904.jpg

As mentioned previously, Scots coins in general from this reign are common - but some mints are incredibly rare - pennies with 28 points in the stars on the reverse are from a very small mintage from a small locale that has never been identified

.alexiii22ptss5056.jpg.b67d9ffd15fb2c3c1b3317b64f09ab70.jpg

This penny has 22 points and is conjectured to have been minted in St. Andrews.

 

 

englands1377.jpg.17611265eec35bfad19e670a155777f2.jpg

This is an Edward I penny minted in Canterbury, from the first coinage that closely resembled Henry III's coinage.  This coin was part of the Colchester Hoard of 1969.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, UkrainiiVityaz said:

It is believed by many researchers that approximately 50 million pennies were minted by Scottish mints during the reign of Alexander III(1249-1286), his coinage was far more prolific than any other reigns because of the growth of trade with Europe.  While it is likely there are Scottish minted coins in the above hoard, English pennies would have come north with the occupying forces from the armies of Edward I(1272-1307) and Edward II(1307-1327) and would have been preferred by the English and their Scottish subordinates.

 

scotlandalexiii28ptsx2.jpg.41d4fd5132afac03608ea37313bc4904.jpg

As mentioned previously, Scots coins in general from this reign are common - but some mints are incredibly rare - pennies with 28 points in the stars on the reverse are from a very small mintage from a small locale that has never been identified

.alexiii22ptss5056.jpg.b67d9ffd15fb2c3c1b3317b64f09ab70.jpg

This penny has 22 points and is conjectured to have been minted in St. Andrews.

 

 

englands1377.jpg.17611265eec35bfad19e670a155777f2.jpg

This is an Edward I penny minted in Canterbury, from the first coinage that closely resembled Henry III's coinage.  This coin was part of the Colchester Hoard of 1969.

I know that after 1367, Scottish pennies were produced at a lower weight, so English coins would've been preferable then. But before then, I don't know why they would've been preferred. Perhaps it's because the Europeans were producing lots of inferior imitations and so anything that wasn't English wasn't trusted.

I have one of those Edward I/Henry III pennies from the Colchester Hoard (which are usually terrible). Rather than it resembling Henry III's coins, it actually looks like an Edward I-III bust, with the 'naturalistic' hair instead of Henry III's curls. What we think of as an Edward bust was originally Henry III. Scottish coins had naturalistic hair earlier, I think, so perhaps the idea came from there.

Henry III Posthumous Issue (under Edward I) Class 6 Long Cross Penny, 1272-1275
image.png.38e99190fcebd06e6fce6094c9468b8c.png
Bury St Edmunds. Silver, 18mm, 1.53g. Crude bust holding sceptre with III to left, naturalistic hair; no initial mark, legend begins at 11 o'clock; HENRICVS REX III. Long cross; ION- O(N)-SAN-TAD. (S 1377). From the Colchester II Hoard 1969.

Edited by John Conduitt
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Does anyone know, or have an informed guess, about why the strikes on these posthumous Henry IIIs are so terrible?  (Sure enough, I can't find pics of mine, but it's comparable.)  Would the mintage coincide with Edward not having made it back from his crusade?  ...Then again, the New Coinage didn't start till 1279.  Are the posthumous ones even common enough to have been minted during the whole interval from 1272?

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