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What Story am I telling?


kirispupis
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Hello everyone,

I'm nearly finished with a collection that tells a story. As you know, I collect via stories where I identify coins that tell it and then pursue them.

Below are three coins from the story. For some fun, which one am I telling? I've deliberately not included attribution, or it would be too easy. 🙂

Hint: Be specific

Tissaphernes.jpg.fabbbaa962a18dd5f0f6333d7e661e03.jpg

 

Syennesis.jpg.95b30f719ef2250d1d8813f75404891a.jpg

 

Athens.jpg.fd948b5ef5a630b88f09247be7e052ca.jpg

 

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Ok, This is bad of  me as I literally finished rereading it (and its incredibly annoying ending) last  night but I still don't get the clues.

Could you help me please? I'm  too myopically Western Greek in my coins...

Athens tet something to do with  his exile from there?

 

Thalatta! Thalatta!

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1 hour ago, Deinomenid said:

Ok, This is bad of  me as I literally finished rereading it (and its incredibly annoying ending) last  night but I still don't get the clues.

Could you help me please? I'm  too myopically Western Greek in my coins...

Tissaphernes - was the 10,000's chief enemy after the Battle of Cunaxa. He was also instrumental during the battle.

Syennesis - allowed Cyrus' army into Cilicia, though attempted to stay friendly to both sides

Athens - birthplace of Xenophon

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What an amazing collection theme! There's so many coins that can be linked to the Story, from all over the greek and Persian world, one could surely make a giant collection of coins relating to the Story and its characters. You did a great job picking out some of the coins linked more directly to the story, nice Owl in particular 😍

 

You say you have twelve coins for the story, I'm curious what the other nine are! Perhaps a Siglos from Artaxerxes II's time, some coins from the regions the 10.000 traveled through like Kolchis or Sinope? I'm looking forward to your full post!

 

An Anabasis-themed collection has been my plan for a collection too, for a long time. Unfortunately due to some difficulties, I was only able to study the time period and the related coins so far and haven't bought a coin in over 8 months 😅

 

Now that my situation has gotten better, I have a nice goal in an auction in the near future, a type minted by one of the main characters, Tissaphernes - I see yours is also a really nice one, the details on the Soldier are great! I'm going for a portrait piece, I really hope I'll be able to win that one!

 

Also, I gotta take a moment to compliment your photography, these pictures look amazing! 

 

Good luck with completing the collection 😁

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1 hour ago, Helvius Pertinax said:

You say you have twelve coins for the story, I'm curious what the other nine are! Perhaps a Siglos from Artaxerxes II's time, some coins from the regions the 10.000 traveled through like Kolchis or Sinope? I'm looking forward to your full post!

I won't post the images here just yet, as one of the coins is on its way, but the following are what I have.

  1. Ataxerxes II stater
  2. Athens tet (above)
  3. Gamerses bronze
  4. Gongylos (early type of Pergamon)
  5. Kebren (uncertain satrap, but given the geography they likely dealt with him)
  6. Kotys I bronze
  7. Orontas bronze
  8. Syennesis stater
  9. Tiribazos stater
  10. Tissaphernes bronze

I originally stated 11, but I accidentally counted Gongylos and Pergamon, when the types are the same.

The last coin I'm aiming for is a Pharnabazos. I'll probably pick up one of the obols, since the staters are pricy.

Technically, I could make it more interesting by adding coins from the cities they passed through and came from, but I chose to limit it to Athens (because I already had one) and Pergamon. I'm already collecting cities for the Philip II, Alexander III, and the Era of the Diadochi collection and this would have been too much.

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On 11/6/2022 at 6:25 PM, Ryro said:

Wonderful spread my friend!

We may never see a more historically important and captivating coin for this period than @AncientJoe has.

I would love to see his gold melted statue emergency coin again. 

Thanks; I can't miss an opportunity to share when summoned!

image.jpeg.35a0792218999a48eb99111fa8378e3d.jpeg

ATTICA. Athens. AV Diobol (1.43 gms), ca. 407/6 B.C.
Svoronos-pl. 15#7. Head of Athena facing right wearing crested Attic helmet adorned with palmette and olive leaves; Reverse: Two owls standing confronted, olive branch between, ethnic in exergue. Ex. John Whitney Walter Collection

Athens was a prolific producer of silver coinage, minting millions of owl tetradrachms. Gold, however, was much scarcer in the region and Athens only minted gold coinage when in severe crisis. This gold diobol comes from the final years of the Peloponnesian War and is one of the most important and rarest Greek coins.

Athens faced heavy losses against Sparta. Near the end of the war, they blocked Athens from accessing its silver mines, resulting in an economic emergency. After four years of being starved out, the need for funds became so dire, the authorities ordered the melting of seven of the eight massive gold statues of Nike which were standing around the Parthenon on the Acropolis.

These statues were symbols of the city’s great economic reserves making this a true moment of desperation for Athens. The gold from these statues was minted into coins and used to construct a new fleet of ships to attempt a naval retaliation. Because of their value, to protect against forgeries, the dies used to strike the coins were stored in the Parthenon treasury in an alabaster box. Further indicating the importance of their minting, the historical context of these gold coins is exceptionally well documented by the playwright Aristophanes and by the Athenian treasury records.

Unfortunately, even with the influx of funds, Athens was ultimately defeated at sea and surrendered to the Spartan general Lysander.

While many thousands of coins were minted with the volume of gold from the statues, only a very small number survive today. This coin is one of only two diobols in private hands with the four others residing in museums. Other denominations are also known but exist in similar numbers, with only one or two examples of each available to private collectors.

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