Jump to content

Happy Feast of Christ the King


TheTrachyEnjoyer
 Share

Recommended Posts

6DEF19A6-B396-47F3-9970-7CD797843E92.jpeg.b0f3e22905e5b7c8c99dd373ee402e67.jpeg7133F8D9-9819-414D-8A2B-950E57DB41AC.jpeg.1c98b29e51a29303fdb6586db1834708.jpeg

Today is the feast of Christ the king! 

John 18:33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

28E1386D-F466-455E-90C4-7B8806C05F1B.jpeg.d7e8c979ec4a70d7f85022ba1d739543.jpeg

“When did Jesus reveal Himself as king? 
In the event of the Cross!”
- Pope Francis

0D06ED6C-159F-4604-955A-718E55B7F75F.jpeg.469d69fc809968818c6a2331f1e3a83b.jpeg

“Jesus Christ is the beginning and the end,
the Alpha and the Omega.
He is the king of the new world.
He is the secret of history.
He is the key to our destiny.”

-St Pope Paul VI

2204E31D-117F-4862-89EB-40406CB251F2.jpeg.42112eb14e2db15e9c66d6280679e32f.jpeg

“Christ, has dominion over all creatures, a dominion not seized by violence nor usurped but His, by essence and by nature.”
- St Cyril of Alexandria 

6BAA95A8-7332-4F8E-93F3-14C5667CB4C6.png.842e1e77097279da4c2e6f01a5d17052.png

Viva Cristo Rey! 
Share any related coins of Christ below

  • Like 12
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have 2 anonymous folles

image.png.2ead7821c6e22cac78c98f6452a2fc3b.png

Attributed to John I (11 December 969 - 10 January 976 A.D.) Constantinople
Anonymous Follis Æ Class A1
23 mm, 6,54 g
Obverse: +ЄMMA-NOVHL. facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger, two pellets in each cross limb, pallium and colobium, holding ornamented Gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings).Reverse: +IҺSЧS XRISTЧS ЬASILЄЧ ЬASILЄ, legend in four lines across field, circle below.
Sear 1793

image.png.256e06cab0ddd7e44c35b40b59d7df1d.png

Anonymous follis. AE 10.35gr
Romanus III or Michael IV, 12 November 1028 - 10 December 1041 A.D.
Bronze anonymous follis, class B; SBCV 1823, Constantinople mint, obverse EMMANOVHL, facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; reverse cross on three steps with pellet at each extremity, in fields IS - XS / BAS-ILE / BAS-ILE (Jesus Christ, King of Kings)

And a coin from Venice

image.png.2b8be420c1de08f30ca6b9c0c55803dd.png

VENICE. Alvise Contarini AD 1676-1684.AE.Soldo.N.D.
DEFENS NOSTER,  Jesus Christ standing, nimbate, right hand raised in benediction, book of gospels in left.
Reverse.S M V ALOYS CON, Doge kneeling left before winged lion of Saint Mark, left paw resting on book of gospels, in exergue value *12* ( 12 bagattini ).
Ref:CNI VIII.pg.310.No.148.

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're a brave man, my dear brother.

It lands on me that, just as that much of the New Testament epistles (especially St.s Paul and Peter) read like a manual for how Christians were (and, thank you, are) supposed to navigate a thoroughly pluralistic society, as a religious minority, we Get to be Part of that pluralistic society.  ...I'm Having some of it!  :<}

I was in the middle of finally doing another OP for Medievals, to try to prop up that still drooping tent (with cordial thanks to everyone who contributed to the last couple of posts), but here are a couple, more or less at random --personal favorites, though.

image.jpeg.e9ac712d1e0d658ceff06d4801323f21.jpeg

My favorite anonymous follis.  I'd have to look up the class, but it's back to Basil II.  I have to love it for the relative completeness of the obverse legend, corresponding to 'Immanuel (God With Us)'.

image.jpeg.aecafda937c3d0ed6d15a6b7f1a52d6e.jpeg

And, of course, this anonymous Aksumite AE, c. later 4th century, with a Latin cross, uncharacteristic both of the issue, and the series generally. 

@TheTrachyEnjoyer, I need to thank you for the notice of what feast day this is.  I promise you, where the liturgical calendar of any tradition is concerned, I'm hopelessly illiterate.  But what I do know is that, to resort to metaphor, Christianity is a language with any number of dialects.  I like to think of us as an innumerable, extended family.  --But we're all  family.

Edited by JeandAcre
  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, JeandAcre said:

I promise you, where the liturgical calendar of any tradition is concerned, I'm hopelessly illiterate.  But what I do know is that, to resort to metaphor, Christianity is a language with any number of dialects.  I like to think of us as an innumerable, extended family. 

Well said! 

I follow the TLM liturgical calendar which is what I based my post off of. Im not sure what day the orthodox celebrate (probably a little later in the year)

https://babylonbee.com/news/orthodox-star-wars-fans-prepare-to-celebrate-may-the-11th-be-with-you

Edited by TheTrachyEnjoyer
  • Laugh 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amen.

One of my favorite stories in the 4th century is the interaction between St. Martin of Tours and Magnus Maximus in 383/4.

From Sulpicius Severus's Life of Saint Martin:

"When a number of bishops from various parts had assembled to the Emperor Maximus, a man of fierce character, and at that time elated with the victory he had won in the civil wars, and when the disgraceful flattery of all around the emperor was generally remarked, while the priestly dignity had, with degenerate submissiveness, taken a second place to the royal retinue, in Martin alone, apostolic authority continued to assert itself. 

For even if he had to make suit to the sovereign for some things, he commanded rather than entreated him; and although often invited, he kept away from his entertainments, saying that he could not take a place at the table of one who, out of two emperors, had deprived one of his kingdom, and the other of his life.

At last, when Maximus maintained that he had not of his own accord assumed the sovereignty, but that he had simply defended by arms the necessary requirements of the empire, regard to which had been imposed upon him by the soldiers, according to the Divine appointment, and that the favor of God did not seem wanting to him who, by an event seemingly so incredible, had secured the victory, adding to that the statement that none of his adversaries had been slain except in the open field of battle, at length, Martin, overcome either by his reasoning or his entreaties, came to the royal banquet.

The king was wonderfully pleased because he had gained this point. Moreover, there were guests present who had been invited as if to a festival; men of the highest and most illustrious rank, - the prefect, who was also consul, named Evodius, one of the most righteous men that ever lived; two courtiers possessed of the greatest power, the brother and uncle of the king, while between these two, the presbyter of Martin had taken his place; but he himself occupied a seat which was set quite close to the king.

About the middle of the banquet, according to custom, one of the servants presented a goblet to the king. He orders it rather to be given to the very holy bishop, expecting and hoping that he should then receive the cup from his right hand. But Martin, when he had drunk, handed the goblet to his own presbyter, as thinking no one worthier to drink next to himself, and holding that it would not be right for him to prefer either the king himself, or those who were next the king, to the presbyter.

And the emperor, as well as all those who were then present, admired this conduct so much, that this very thing, by which they had been undervalued, gave them pleasure. The report then ran through the whole palace that Martin had done, at the king’s dinner, what no bishop had dared to do at the banquets of the lowest judges."

A fistful of siliquae of Emperor Magnus Maximus.

No description available.

Edited by Magnus Maximus
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, TheTrachyEnjoyer said:

Share any related coins of Christ below


image.jpeg.982825bc01f966064e116bcc6c437377.jpeg

 
Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus and Romanos II Porphyrogenitus, Solidus of the Byzantine Macedonian dynasty 950/955 AD, Material: Gold, Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 4.42g, Mint: Constantinople, Reference: Sear 1751
 
Obverse: Crowned facing busts of Constantine VII (on left), bearded, wearing loros, and Romanus II (on right), wearing chlamys pinned at right shoulder, jointly holding patriarchal cross with globular terminus between them. The Inscription reads: + COҺSTAҺT CЄ ROMAҺ AЧGG Ь R.
 
Reverse: Half length bust of Christ Pantokrator facing, wearing nimbus cruciger with two pellets in each limb, pallium and colobium, right hand raised in benediction, book of Gospels cradled in left; single border. The Inscription reads: + IҺS XPS RЄX RЄGNANTIЧM.
 
 
This is the only relevant coin I had in my collection with a Christ Pantokrator at the reverse. 
 
 
Edited by Prieure de Sion
  • Like 6
  • Heart Eyes 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Magnus Maximus said:

Also, perhaps my favorite version of the Lord's Prayer.

@Magnus Maximus, that's brilliant.  Right, not an adherent, but I grew up with an LP of plainchant from Thomas Merton's Benedictine (if memory serves) monastery in Kentucky.  I really need how different kinds of Christians access Our Sovereign Lord --except, by His sovereign mercy, that's exactly what we all end up doing!

Here's the obverse of another anonymous follis of mine.  An obvious overstrike ...of Something; I still have no idea what.  But for me, the apparent hand to the side of Christ's head evokes His baptism, when God the Father said, 'This is My beloved Son, in Whom I am well pleased.'

image.jpeg.7c99ba71a67a53078be2b52e30d34ad4.jpeg

And here's some Palestrina to complement the plainchant.  The Kyrie from the Missa Papae Marcelli, as read by the Tallis Scholars.  Something I need, on an ongoing basis.

 

 

Edited by JeandAcre
  • Like 2
  • Yes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one with a portrait of Christ.  🙂

=009-780.jpg

AV/EL Histamenon Nomisma Michael VII Ducas. 
Constantinople AD 1071-1078 
Obv: Facing half-length bust of Christ Pantocrator, with cruciform nimbus, five pellets within each bar; barred IC - XC in right and left fields;
Rev: + MIXAHΛ RACIΛO Δ, crowned facing half-length bust of Michael, wearing loros and saccos, holding jeweled vexillum with pellet on shaft in right hand and globus cruciger in left
31mm, 4.37 g
Sear 1868. DOC 2d
 

Edited by happy_collector
  • Like 7
  • Heart Eyes 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One more thing I’ll add; I consider the banning of infancide by Valentinian I and Valens, to be one of the greatest achievements of Christianity in the 4th century. Here is one of my favorites from the Nicene Soldier Emperor, Valentinian I. 

From the Theodosian Code  9.14.1:

"Emperors Valentinian , Valens , and Gratian .aaa.p. If any one has attacked or aggressively committed the killing of a child, this evil shall be (a) capital offense .pp. vii. id.Feb. Rome, Gratianus a.iii"

Nj26s4zFqfK89RnJMdP5S7qN3mB3xR.jpg

Grade: VF+/EF- black patina, flan crack, small area of damage on obverse 11 o'clock Material: Silver Weight: 1.91 g Diameter: 19 mm Obverse: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust to right Reverse: VRBS ROMA / R P, Roma seated left holding reversed spear and Victory on globe.

FB0C2FE8-9BAB-44BF-AD53-088B5273753E.jpeg

Obv: Christ seated facing on backless throne, right hand raised and holding book of gospels with IC-XC to left and right Rev: Facing half-length figures of Mary, nimbate, on right, and John, holding patriarchal cross between them, hand of God above John's head with the legend +IW ΔECΠOTH and ΘV-MR in fields Constantinople Mint (now Istanbul, Turkey) Sear 1938 / DOC 1a.2 Gold, 4.32 grams, 29.3 mm ANAAB certification AB0841.

Edited by Magnus Maximus
  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@TheTrachyEnjoyer, consider the source, of course, but it finally landed on me that, after @Magnus Maximus' and my contributions, it would be terrific if you posted some Eastern Orthodox liturgical music.  I had an LP of some as a kid, on the old (but great) Nonesuch label, in the '70's.  I remember there being a member of the choir with a bass that could move furniture.  ...Anyway, it would be cordially appreciated.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, JeandAcre said:

@TheTrachyEnjoyer, consider the source, of course, but it finally landed on me that, after @Magnus Maximus' and my contributions, it would be terrific if you posted some Eastern Orthodox liturgical music.  I had an LP of some as a kid, on the old (but great) Nonesuch label, in the '70's.  I remember there being a member of the choir with a bass that could move furniture.  ...Anyway, it would be cordially appreciated.

This might be a good start

“lost voices of the Hagia Sophia”

It is an attempt to recreate what orthodox liturgy would sound like sung in the unique soundscape of the Hagia Sophia Church. There hasnt been in a service there in centuries and obviously before modern sound recordings

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@TheTrachyEnjoyer. I'm truly at a loss to find an appropriate superlative.  Wow.

I remember seeing some of the documentary about this project.  Might you have posted it somewhere on this, or even the old forum?  If you wanted to post a link to it, I'd at least bookmark it this time.  ...And Huge Thanks for this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...