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An article from CNN, of interest (to some). English gold coins - hoard found


Topcat7
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  • Topcat7 changed the title to An article from CNN, of interest (to some). English gold coins - hoard found

Interesting, because banks existed in 1727.  The age range looks certainly from James i  as far as I can see. It is a poor  poor article  and there must be better some where.  What I can see that all the coins look late medieval  so 1727 George 1 , the year of his death.  various shenanigans with Jacobite  sympathies is my view.  Would be interested in more expert views.

NSK= John

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19 minutes ago, NewStyleKing said:

meresting, because banks existed in 1727.  The age range looks certainly from James i  as far as I can see. It is a poor  poor article  and there must be better some where.  What I can see that all the coins look late medieval  so 1727 George 1 , the year of his death.  various shenanigans with Jacobite  sympathies is my view.  Would be interested in more expert views.

NSK= John

The lots for the upcoming auction can be viewed on Spink's website.

Edited by DonnaML
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5 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

The lots for the upcoming auction can be viewed on Spink's website.

Indeed, much better documentation than the miserable cable news article.

 

And banks did exist thence, but trust didn't and shouldn't.  I've studied well the banking history of Great Britain, given that I collect banknotes also - and failures, fraud etc were common and well, still are.

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Thanks for that you two!  But what an interesting  age range!  The salt glaze cup is interesting too  and the Scots coinage, the Union with Scotland was.....1707  but along the border ( not far away)  there must have been lots of traffic in coins of the realms!  It reminds me of those huge buried pots where coins kept being added  until you could no longer dig the pot out....but that was for religious reasons...I think  the death of the German king George l and the threat of Jacobite  rebellions was enough to put the wind up them. Why they seemingly forgot about it...anyone's guess.....anyone  out there?

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1 hour ago, NewStyleKing said:

No coins of Mr Oliver Cromwell !....... a political decision, or were they too rare   ....up north ? 

Possibly political, although by 1727, the Commonwealth was pretty old news. The hoarder, Joseph Fernley, was born around 1650, after Charles I had been executed. Even if they'd wanted to, I imagine they had none to hoard. Commonwealth coinage was recalled in the early 1660s and 2/3 of all struck was taken out of circulation. The hoarders seem to have focused on pound coins, which in the Commonwealth era would be the unite, a pretty scarce coin.
 

2 hours ago, UkrainiiVityaz said:

And banks did exist thence, but trust didn't and shouldn't.  I've studied well the banking history of Great Britain, given that I collect banknotes also - and failures, fraud etc were common and well, still are.

This is true, although hoarding was much less common by this time, which is why this hoard is unusual. They might've been hedging against problems with the banks, but they were a merchant family, so surely they'd be fans of banking.

Perhaps they needed the liquidity. I don't know what banks there were in Hull, but the Bank of England was only in London at that time. It could be difficult to get money quickly outside of London, particularly a sizable sum. Gold coins would have had the advantage (compared to bank notes) of being intrinsically valuable and acceptable to foreign merchants.

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