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Zecchini - Venice Gold Dukat's


LuckyLuudje

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I haven't seen any Zecchino yet on the Forum and Yesterday I spend all day determining and documenting my Zecchini.

So I just post the document I made here. And hope that I haven't made a mistake.

 

The design of the Venetian gold ducat, or zecchino, remained unchanged for over 500 years, from its introduction in 1284 to the takeover of Venice by Napoleon in 1797.

No other coin design has ever been produced over such a long historical period.

Initially called "ducat" (ducato), for the ruling Doge of Venice who was prominently depicted on it.

It was called the zecchino, after the Zecca (mint) of Venice, since 1543 when Venice began minting a silver coin also called a ducat. The name of the mint ultimately derives from Arabic: سكّة (sikka), meaning a coin mould or die.

 

Italian States VENICE Zecchino Pasquale Cicogna MB# 271 (1585-95)

Obverse: St. Mark standing at left presenting staff with DVX vertically at top to doge kneeling at right

Obverse Legend: PASC. CICO(N). - S. M. VENE(T).

Reverse: Full-length facing figure of Christ in beaded ellipse lined with stars

Reverse Legend: SIT. T. XPE. DAT. Q. T(V). - REGIS. ISTE. DVC(A)(T).

Ruler: Pasquale Cicogna

Note: Ref. P#1-12; Fr. 1270.

 

1777559367_Pasqualef.JPG.9e0b64996dba0eceefc1704fb4a1b569.JPG1742816199_Pasqualeb.JPG.e7e18e4f994ab837041f6b39137679b9.JPG

Italian States VENICE Zecchino Alvise Mocenego KM# 460 (1700-09)

Obverse: St. Mark standing at left presenting staff with cross and DVX vertically at top to doge kneeling at right

Obverse Legend: ALOY. MOCENI. - S. M. VENET.

Reverse: Full-length facing figure of Christ in beaded ellipse lined with stars

Reverse Legend: SIT. T. XPE. DAT. Q. TV - REGIS. ISTE. DVCA.

Ruler: Alvise Mocenigo II

Note: Ref. P#2-4; Fr. 1358.

 

254721813_MocenigoF.JPG.050e60bee708c002d15fb0b44051d150.JPG1785809561_Mocenigob.JPG.dacc4af5832b209636b1767ab16a1710.JPG

Italian States VENICE Zecchino Giovanni Corner II  KM# 481 (1709-22)

Obverse: St. Mark standing at left presenting staff with cross and DVX vertically at top to doge kneeling at right

Obverse Legend: IOAN. CORNEL. - S. M. VENET.

Reverse: Full-length facing figure of Christ in beaded ellipse lined with stars

Reverse Legend: SIT. T. XPE. DAT. Q. TV - REGIS. ISTE. DVCA

Ruler: Giovanni Corner II

Note: Ref. P#4-8; Fr. 1372.123982895_CornerF.JPG.13398b556a94ccde1eb408e9f212ddab.JPG1740106425_CornerB.JPG.c232c4803b33e06a820517e2a6bbe63f.JPG

Italian States VENICE Zecchino Francesco Loredan KM# 619 (1752-62)

Obverse: St. Mark standing at left presenting staff with cross and DVX vertically at top to doge kneeling at right

Obverse Legend: FRANC. LAVRED. (D.) - S. M. VENET.

Reverse: Full-length facing figure of Christ in beaded ellipse lined with stars

Reverse Legend: SIT. T. XPE. DAT. Q. TV - REGIS. ISTE. DVCA

Ruler: Francesco Loredan  -

Note: Ref. P#1-4; Fr. 1405. Prev. C-21.

404473725_LoredanF.JPG.766ff6cd65ae3c15a4aa1bd54946da35.JPG

992693310_LoredanB.JPG.780d3961ae841c06969cb6106e5ec98b.JPG

These coins are one of my favourites.

Please feel free to comment or post yours.

 

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Oh I have one question - I noticed that so many coins are punched. I mean - there are a lot of coins with holes on the market - but with the Zecchini I particularly notice that so many specimens are holed. is there a particular reason for this? Were they particularly popular to wear around the neck for "good luck"? Why were they so popular to wear?

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20 minutes ago, Prieure de Sion said:

Oh I have one question - I noticed that so many coins are punched. I mean - there are a lot of coins with holes on the market - but with the Zecchini I particularly notice that so many specimens are holed. is there a particular reason for this? Were they particularly popular to wear around the neck for "good luck"? Why were they so popular to wear?

Very good question, But I am by far an expert on these, I just like the design and coins.

The most important reason I have bought these Zecchini is because I have the hobby to hunt for a local golden coin when I visit a place on holiday.

And I have been 4 times in Venice in the past. But indeed you are right, I also noticed that more than normal coins from Venice are holed or plugged!

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Very nice coins! 
Venetian coins are one area I’d like to break into one day. 
Here is my only coin from the most Serene Republic

image.jpeg.4147d0fe7c36a8aebb2a423d1eb233d7.jpeg

image.jpeg.7a7908a491aad1cd74e41a68735f3fd4.jpegObverse: Doge (duke) Pietro Gradengo (stands facing receiving banner from patron saint St. Mark. Lettering: . PE • GRADONICO • Reverse: Facing figure of Nimbate Jesus Christ Pantocrator, enthroned, IC XC field to the left and right. Lettering: IC / XC

 

Edited by Magnus Maximus
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The Venetian ducat was so popular it was imitated by other medieval states. This one was put out by the Duke of Milan who had somehow acquired an interest in the Greek (Byzantine) island of Chios as a Crusader state occupation around the year 1430. It1144073649_IMG_2283Ducat1.jpg.417590549c396df588002fefc280515c.jpg1475159574_IMG_2284Ducat2.jpg.242e8665017d378a53fd8230020f390e.jpg weighs just under 3.5 grams and as they were locally struck (not in Milan) they are somewhat below the expertise of the Milan Mint. From the color of the gold I also suspect some admixture of silver in the coin. It may have been issued in the name of Filipo Maria Visconti. The somewhat crude inscription reads as something like S PETRUS DVX D ME DIOLAN and SIT T:XRE QTV REGIS ISTE DUC. It may be Goldberg 3989.

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image.jpeg.af9b283d3e0cd543581403c8380940dd.jpegimage.jpeg.e4b24ab38c37f306f92034897a70981d.jpeg I think keeping a thread on ducats is a good idea, so I will contribute this coin.  The prototype is a Venetian ducat of Andrea Dandolo.

The original scholarship on this coin was the following.  The state is the Duchy of Achaia, a relic of the partitioning of the Byzantine empire after the conquest of Constantinople in 1204 by the forces of the Fourth Crusade.  Time of Robert d’Anjou, Duchy of Achaia 1346-64 AD. Schlumberger XII/34. Electrum. Note the “K” to the left of Christ’s foot which distinguishes these coins. Another “K” is on the obverse between AND and DANDOLO. 

But scholarly opinion has shifted to the following...

The 'K' Series ducats, named after the letter K located in reverse inscription, near Jesus's feet, were struck in the area of Asia Minor, possibly Smyrna prior to 1435 (based on hoard evidence). Mazarakis Group I is a controversial group where many fluctuations in the purity of the gold have been noted, ranging between 30% and 80%. According to Mazarakis these are the first gold coins of the post-Seljuk beyliks of western Asia Minor. In contrast to what it was supposed until now, the first group with the debased gold Ducats was followed by a more pure and carefully struck Group II also imitating mainly the ducats of Andrea Dandolo. In any case this early group seems to be really rare as proven by the limited number of dies used and possibly many coins were intentionally removed from the circulation.

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