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The new RIC V.4 review


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To everyone's surprise, the 5th volume of the Roman Imperial Coinage series (Volume V.4) has received a thorough revision and update. Jerome Mairat, one of the most respected specialists on the coins of the Gallic Empire, has prepared an impressive study with a considerable increase compared to the first edition in the number of photographic representations of the coins. Serious collectors of these 3rd century coins and scholars pursuing studies of this lawless period of Roman history will want to add this important study to their collections. The RIC series began in 1923 and became the standard numismatic reference work.

This brand new volume, published to celebrate the centenary of the series, covers the coinage of the Gallic Empire from 260 to 274 AD. The original version dated from 1933 and was produced by Webb, Mattingly and Sydenham, so a complete revision was more than welcome. The original version (V.2) included the coinage of Probus until the reform of Diocletian, including the Gallic empire, the two British emperors and a dozen other characters described as Usurpers. Let us also remember that according to the authors themselves, this version was more of a handbook than a corpus. Around a hundred pages were devoted to the eight rulers of the Imperium Galliarum, with only three of the twenty plates illustrating coins from these emperors.

Let us first mention that this new version of 404 pages arrives in a new format of 9 x 11 1/4 inches, the same as that used for the RIC II.3 and also identical to that of the Roman Provincial Coinage series. The new RIC V.4 is entirely based on the doctoral thesis The Coinage of the Gallic Empire produced around ten years ago by Jerome Mairat, which was however revised and corrected over the last year by the author . After an introduction and the usual acknowledgments, the work begins with a list of abbreviations then public collections and the list of publications and monetary treasures which were consulted during the conception of this work (p. VII-XVII). Then we discover an examination of the controversial subjects of the chronology and monetary workshops of the Gallic Empire, followed by an analysis of the different denominations, iconographies and designs which will be presented in this volume (p. 1-42, chapter 1-4) .

Pages 43-47 contain an introduction to the catalogue which is necessary given its new two columns format, as well as explanations facilitating its understanding, making its exploration very easy even for the neophyte. Note also that there is an updated frequency index of the different coins, which will please all collectors of these coins. As for the catalogue itself, it covers 200 pages in this volume (p. 47-247). It is organized by reign in chronological order, following a single sequence (1-829) throughout this work. Each of the sections reserved for an emperor is divided by monetary workshop, with an introduction on the classification of issues and details on the iconography of the different types. Many readers will find the detailed notes and references on collections or monetary treasures containing particular coins very practical.

The appendix contains a useful and condensed list of all the antoniniani for each of the emperors (p. 251-260), and also a concordance table for eight other reference sources for the coins of the Gallic Empire (p. 261-278 ). The indexes (p. 279-294) contain an exhaustive list of all the obverse and reverse legends, the names and titles of each emperor and all the busts and monetary types of the reverses. The last section of this work presents 88 plates illustrating the vast majority of the coins in the catalog, namely 1550 black and white photographs of excellent quality. This new version of the Roman Imperial Coinage should be an integral part of all libraries for those who want to understand and deepen these coinage. Thanks to Jerome Mairat for bringing to fruition this colossal project which will serve as a reference for decades to come, and which I hope will allow even more numismatists and collectors to take an interest in this fascinating period of history again unknown.

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Edited by Ocatarinetabellatchitchix
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1 hour ago, Ocatarinetabellatchitchix said:

IMG_6334.jpeg.892ff112c15652de5191f07e735624d0.jpeg
 

To everyone's surprise, the 5th volume of the Roman Imperial Coinage series (Volume V.4) has received a thorough revision and update. Jerome Mairat, one of the most respected specialists on the coins of the Gallic Empire, has prepared an impressive study with a considerable increase compared to the first edition in the number of photographic representations of the coins. Serious collectors of these 3rd century coins and scholars pursuing studies of this lawless period of Roman history will want to add this important study to their collections. The RIC series began in 1923 and became the standard numismatic reference work.

This brand new volume, published to celebrate the centenary of the series, covers the coinage of the Gallic Empire from 260 to 274 AD. The original version dated from 1933 and was produced by Webb, Mattingly and Sydenham, so a complete revision was more than welcome. The original version (V.2) included the coinage of Probus until the reform of Diocletian, including the Gallic empire, the two British emperors and a dozen other characters described as Usurpers. Let us also remember that according to the authors themselves, this version was more of a handbook than a corpus. Around a hundred pages were devoted to the eight rulers of the Imperium Galliarum, with only three of the twenty plates illustrating coins from these emperors.

Let us first mention that this new version of 404 pages arrives in a new format of 9 x 11 1/4 inches, the same as that used for the RIC II.3 and also identical to that of the Roman Provincial Coinage series. The new RIC V.4 is entirely based on the doctoral thesis The Coinage of the Gallic Empire produced around ten years ago by Jerome Mairat, which was however revised and corrected over the last year by the author . After an introduction and the usual acknowledgments, the work begins with a list of abbreviations then public collections and the list of publications and monetary treasures which were consulted during the conception of this work (p. VII-XVII). Then we discover an examination of the controversial subjects of the chronology and monetary workshops of the Gallic Empire, followed by an analysis of the different denominations, iconographies and designs which will be presented in this volume (p. 1-42, chapter 1-4) .

Pages 43-47 contain an introduction to the catalogue which is necessary given its new two columns format, as well as explanations facilitating its understanding, making its exploration very easy even for the neophyte. Note also that there is an updated frequency index of the different coins, which will please all collectors of these coins. As for the catalogue itself, it covers 200 pages in this volume (p. 47-247). It is organized by reign in chronological order, following a single sequence (1-829) throughout this work. Each of the sections reserved for an emperor is divided by monetary workshop, with an introduction on the classification of issues and details on the iconography of the different types. Many readers will find the detailed notes and references on collections or monetary treasures containing particular coins very practical.

The appendix contains a useful and condensed list of all the antoniniani for each of the emperors (p. 251-260), and also a concordance table for eight other reference sources for the coins of the Gallic Empire (p. 261-278 ). The indexes (p. 279-294) contain an exhaustive list of all the obverse and reverse legends, the names and titles of each emperor and all the busts and monetary types of the reverses. The last section of this work presents 88 plates illustrating the vast majority of the coins in the catalog, namely 1550 black and white photographs of excellent quality. This new version of the Roman Imperial Coinage should be an integral part of all libraries for those who want to understand and deepen these coinage. Thanks to Jerome Mairat for bringing to fruition this colossal project which will serve as a reference for decades to come, and which I hope will allow even more numismatists and collectors to take an interest in this fascinating period of history again unknown.

IMG_6336.jpeg.680b3ce4a8c2a19ad4c9637c25147a23.jpeg

 

IMG_6335.jpeg.f9af5da8d1484d8302de82b7622120eb.jpeg

Thanks for this. Do the concordance tables include one for his own dissertation, which is available online as a free pdf download? It would be helpful in deciding whether to buy this to get an idea as to how extensive the revisions and additions have been.

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11 minutes ago, DonnaML said:

Do the concordance tables include one for his own dissertation

No. The other sources are: RIC (first edition), Elmer, Bastien, Schulte, Cunetio, Normanby, Doyen and AGK. The new version has many differences compared with his thesis, e.g. when a coin type exists with both punctuated and un punctuated coins, the distinction has been deemed unnecessary, and the coin are both listed under the same type. Other types are now considered as contemporary imitations, so they disappeared from the corpus. There are some changes about the dating of some Issues, but the BIG modification in this version is the revision of the moment where the two mints merge together. It will make a huge difference in the attribution of all the coins produced after the death of Victorinus. I’ll write something about it soon, but I have to digest all this first ! At 185 £ it’s not cheap at all, but I will use it (I hope) for the next 40 years…

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Thanks for this @Ocatarinetabellatchitchix! I just contacted Jerome about an interesting find of a new Postumus coin type in The Netherlands. The obverse is new, the reverse is a die match with an aureus in his dissertation (no. 323) and dated late 264-early 265. I will write a short article about it next year. Interestingly, the reverse shows a temple of Roma. Because of the special obverse (with frontal emperor) I think the issue marks therefor some kind of celebration. Perhaps the opening of a new built temple, or an offering at the temple after a won battle or so. I was looking into Roma-temples and it seems there are a few in both Köln and Trier. I found this website, but was not yet able to use it to select the known Roma temples.

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16 hours ago, Coinmaster said:

! I just contacted Jerome about an interesting find of a new Postumus coin type

I also talked with him 2 days ago and he mentioned the new discovery ! There was a discussion about it last week on a French site, and the reverse was also known by de Witte and according to a note in Schulte, the gold specimen would be a modern cast forgery. But the new coin will change that.

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Edited by Ocatarinetabellatchitchix
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Ahh, just ordered the book with discount! Delivery cost is high, but still is a good deal.

See:

RIC V.4 - The Gallic Empire (AD 260-274)
Order now with Leu's discount code 'LEU' and save 20%
 
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2023 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the first volume of the Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC) series by Harold Mattingly and Edward Allan Sydenham, the standard reference work for coins issued by the Roman emperors. Originally conceived as a ten-volume series, the final volume of RIC was published in 1994. By this point, many of the earlier volumes were already outdated, which is why they are since gradually revised. An updated RIC I (Augustus to Vitellius) appeared in 1984, RIC II (Vespasian-Hadrian) was split into three parts, two of which were published in 2007 (Vespasian-Domitian) and 2019 (Hadrian), respectively, while the volume dedicated to Nerva and Trajan is still in the making.

Perhaps the most outdated of the original RIC volumes now is RIC V, which is dedicated to the coinage of the barracks emperors from Valerian I. to Florian (RIC V.1, published in 1927) and Probus to Maximian (RIC V.2, published in 1933), respectively. In the nine decades since the publication of RIC V.2 in 1933, new discoveries and research have greatly expanded our knowledge about the coinage of this turbulent yet crucial period of Roman history. We are thus very excited that our friend Dr. Jerome Mairat has just published RIC V.4: The Gallic Empire (AD 260-274) to coincide with RIC’s 100th anniversary.

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Spinks book site is now back up and running.

I have successfully ordered and received my copy from them.

A very brief initial inspection is positive. This isn't a book I will be using every day or even on a weekly basis. I dabble with the Gallic Empire periodically and have bought this volume to support my occasional forays into this coinage.

I looks forward to using it in anger. I will start my examining my historical Gallic Empire purchases to see what, if anything, more I can learn about them.

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